Thursday, 23rd March, 2017

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Thursday, 23rd March, 2017

 

The House met at 1430 hours

 

[MR SPEAKER in the Chair]

 

NATIONAL ANTHEM

 

PRAYER

 

_______

 

MINISTERIAL STATEMENT

 

STATUS OF THE CONSTRUCTION OF THREE UNIVERSITY COLLEGES

 

The Minister of Higher Education (Prof. Luo): Mr Speaker, I thank you for according me this opportunity to issue a statement on the status of the construction of the University College of Science and Mathematics in Nalolo District, University College of Applied Arts and Commerce in Katete District and University College of Science and Technology in Kabompo District. This statement is in response to a question put to Her Honour the Vice-President, Mrs Inonge Wina who, in response, asked me to update the House on the status of the project.

 

Mr Speaker, from the outset, I want to inform this House that our chiefs in the three locations where we are implementing the project have demonstrated commendable leadership by providing huge portions of land needed for the expansion of the university colleges once they develop and evolve into fully-fledged universities. I, therefore, commend them for working closely with the Government in indentifying the project sites and for their commitment to the development of Zambia, our motherland. It is also the Government’s desire to see the project successfully completed and operationalised.

 

Mr Speaker, the Government has signed loan agreements worth US$41 million with the following co-operating partners to finance the construction of the three colleges:

 

Institution                                                                                                  Amount

 

The Arab Bank for Economic Development in Africa                                  US$4.5 million

 

The Organisation of Petroleum Exporting Countries Fund (OPEC)            US$10 million

 

The Kuwait Fund                                                                                   US$13 million

 

The Abu Dubai Fund                                                                             `US$13.5 million.

 

Sir, the loan funds will be disbursed by the financiers as soon as the procurement processes have been concluded. However, the funds provided will not be adequate to complete the construction and equipment of the colleges. In order to close this financing gap, the Government has secured a pledge of additional funding from the Government of Saudi Arabia, although no amount has been specified because the Saudi Government wants to see the environmental impact assessment (EIA) report before deciding how much money it will provide. My ministry and the ministries of Finance and Foreign Affairs have maintained an active dialogue with the Saudi Arabian Government in order to ensure that the loan agreement is concluded. Further, my ministry has engaged consultants to undertake the EIA in the project sites. The consultants are scheduled to go on site as soon as paper work is completed. The ministry has also covered a lot of ground in the engagement of the main consultant, who will design and supervise the works and the shortlisted names have been sent to the funders for approval. If a no-objection is given, a request for proposals will be floated to the shortlisted consultants.

 

Mr Speaker, I thank you.

 

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

 

Mr Speaker: Hon. Members, before we proceed with questions on points of clarification, I have some guidance to provide on the raising of points of order on the Floor of the House.

 

Hon. Members, I have repeatedly guided that points of order must be used to bring any breach of order or transgression of any rule of the House to the immediate attention of Presiding Officers. Unfortunately, the trend, especially lately, has been that points of order have been used to raise issues unrelated to the Business of the House, which is clearly an abuse of the facility. That practice must end forthwith. Therefore, I reiterate that points of order will be administered very strictly as follows:

 

  1. they should be used for the maintenance of general order and decorum in the House;

 

  1. they should be raised when the procedure of the House is violated. Where appropriate, you will be required to cite the relevant Standing Order or rule of the Handbook violated. We all have the  relevant documents on orders and rules; and

 

Mr Livune: Hear, hear!

 

Mr Speaker: Further,

 

(c)        they must be raised on matters related to business before the House at the particular moment. I have repeatedly used the word ‘contemporaneous’.

 

Hon. Members: Hear, hear!

 

Mr Speaker: In the past, I have guided that hon. Members wishing to bring to my attention important and urgent national matters should resort to the following mechanisms:

 

  1. Questions of an Urgent Nature, under Standing Order No. 31;

 

  1. The Vice-President Question Time, on Fridays;

 

  1. statements by Hon. Ministers issued at my direction or discretion of the Chair; and

 

  1. Private Members’ Motions.

 

Therefore, any hon. Member who will attempt to raise a point of order outside the parameters I have circumscribed will be curtailed.

 

Thank you.

 

Hon. Members, you are now free to ask questions on points of clarifications on the statement issued by the hon. Minister of Higher Education.

 

Mr A. B. Malama (Nchelenge): Mr Speaker, I thank the hon. Minister for the update. However, I would like to get clarity …

 

Mr Mwewa: On a point of order, Sir.

 

Mr Speaker: Is it a procedural one? On which rule?

 

Laughter

 

Mr Mwewa: It is a transgression point of order, Mr Speaker.

 

Mr Speaker: Transgression of a point of order?

 

Mr Mwewa: Yes, Sir.

 

Mr Speaker: What do you mean?

 

Mr Mwewa: Transgression of the rules of this House, Mr Speaker.

 

Mr Speaker: Anyway, I will give you an opportunity to state what rule has been transgressed.

 

Mr Mwewa: Mr Speaker, I thank you for giving me this opportunity.

 

Sir, I rise on this urgent point of order, which is on the status of this House and that of the Chair.

 

Mr Speaker, when I woke up this morning, I saw an article in The Mast newspaper, which was headlined:

 

            “Matibini a Cadre − HH”

 

Hon. Government Members: Aah!

 

Mr Speaker: Order!

 

Mr Mwewa: Mr Speaker, on page 3 of the paper, the UPND leader is quoted saying:

 

“DR PATRICK Matibini is a cadre and not fit to sit in Parliament as Speaker, says UPND Leader, Hakainde Hichilema.”

 

Hon. Government Members: Aah! No!

 

Mr Mwewa: Mr Speaker, Mr Hichilema is further quoted saying:

 

‘“He is basically a disgrace to the people of Zambia because of the way he is managing Parliament.”’

 

Hon. Government Members: Aah!

 

Mr Mwewa: Sir, the Patriotic Front (PF) Government, which is in power today; the Movement for Multi-party Democracy (MMD); the Forum for Democracy and Development (FDD); and even the United National Independence Party (UNIP) have never insulted a Speaker. Neither has any Independent Member of Parliament ever done that.

 

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

 

Mr Mwewa: Sir, for the United Party for National Development (UPND) leader to say what he said, he must have consulted UPND members in this House.

 

 Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

 

Mr Mwewa: Mr Speaker, this is unacceptable and unprecedented in this country. He, therefore, is supposed to be summoned to appear before this House.

 

Mr Mwewa indicated the Bar of the House

 

 Hon. UPND Members: No! It is not worth it.

 

Mr Mwewa: He should be punished.

 

Sir, is Mr Hichilema in order to disgrace and demean this House and its Chairperson, the Speaker, whom we respect so much?

 

I need you serious ruling.

 

Mr Mwewa laid the paper on the Table.

 

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

 

Mr Speaker: Order!

 

I will reserve my ruling to enable me study what has been laid on the Table of the House.

 

Mr A. B. Malama: Mr Speaker, before I was interrupted, I about to ask a question on the health university college to be built in Nalolo.

 

Sir, the people of Nchelenge are asking whether the college that is earmarked for construction in Nalolo was supposed to have been built in Nchelenge, as promised by the late President, Mr Michael Chilufya Sata, may his soul rest in peace?

 

Prof. Luo: Mr Speaker, I am not sure that there was diversion of any college. What the hon. Member of Parliament should be asking is when a college will be built in his constituency. That said, I review the different promises that have been by our Presidents, specifically the late Mr Michael Chilufya Sata, may his soul rest in peace, and the current one. It is my duty to implement all the promises that the Presidents of this country, whom I serve, have made to the people.

 

Sir, I thank you.

 

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

 

EXTENSION OF CLOSURE OF MWERU-LUAPULA FISHERY

 

The Minister of Fisheries and Livestock (Mr Katambo): Mr Speaker, I thank you for giving me this opportunity to issue a statement on the extension of the closure of the Mweru-Luapula Fishery and the measures being put in place to control the spread of cholera in Luapula Province, in general, and the Mweru/Luapula Fishery, in particular.

 

Sir, following the declaration by the Ministry of Health of a cholera epidemic in the shore districts of Nchelenge and Chiengi, I have extended indefinitely the fishing ban in the Mweru-Luapula Fishery. As the House is aware, my ministry effects an annual fishing ban from 1st December to the last day of February. The last fishing ban ended on 1st March, 2017. However, following the declaration by the Ministry of Health of the cholera outbreak, the Mweru-Luapula Fishery will remain closed to stop the spread of the epidemic. The ban will be lifted after the Ministry of Health declares the lakeshore districts free of cholera.

 

I thank you, Mr Speaker.

 

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

 

Mr Speaker: Hon. Members, you are now free to ask questions on points of clarification on the statement issued by the hon. Minister of Fisheries and Livestock.

 

Ms Katuta (Chiengi): Mr Speaker, I thank the hon. …

 

Mr Mwiimbu: On a point of order, Sir.

 

Mr Speaker: A point of order is raised.

 

Mr Mwiimbu: Mr Speaker, in accordance with your advice, I rise regarding Standing Order No. 36. Barely five minutes ago, you guided that those who want to raise points of order must specifically indicate the point of order they are raising.

 

Sir, seeing as a point of order on a point of order was allowed on me, …

 

Hon. Government Members: No!

 

Mr Lusambo: Ngwele, iwe!

 

Mr Speaker: Order, on the right!

 

Mr Mwiimbu: Mr Speaker, whoever said “ngwele” is a ngwele.

 

Laughter

 

Mr Speaker: Order, Hon. Jack Mwiimbu, just continue raising your point of order.

 

Mr Mwiimbu: Mr Speaker, I am raising a procedural point of order.

 

Sir, you advised us that if we want to raise a point of order, we cannot just do it. Rather, we must quote the specific Standing Order whose breach has necessitated the raising of the point of order. However, the hon. Member who just raised a point of order did not even quote anything. Is that an exception to the rules of the House?

 

Interruptions

 

Mr Speaker: To begin with, we know the standing practice is that it is not competent to raise a point of order on a point of order. However, given the fact that clarity seems to be sort on what I had said, I will reiterate my guidance.

 

I think it is important that everybody is clear in their minds on this matter. I do not want to be overly technical. I will explain myself very clearly.

 

In my ruling ‒ and you may want to get the verbatim transcript of what I said afterwards ‒ I qualified it. I said, “Where appropriate,” the breached rule should be cited, and I used those words advisedly because I knew that points of order could also be raised outside on issues not falling under the Standing Orders or the rules of the Parliamentary Handbook, based …

 

Interruptions

 

Mr Speaker: Listen carefully, based on practice. We have cited precedents here, especially from India. Some of our decisions have been anchored on precedents from India, Canada or Australia, but you will not find those precedents in our rule books. However, the National Assembly (Powers and Privileges) Act of our Constitution allows us to borrow practices from the Commonwealth. So, there will be instances when an issue that is anchored on practice, not rules or Standing Orders, arises. Even our precedents, that is, the decisions of the Presiding Officers, are sources of direction in decision-making. Additionally, we also refer to a law or the Constitution.

 

That is my ruling.

 

Ms Katuta: Mr Speaker, I thank the Ministry of Fisheries and Livestock for what it is doing, together with the Ministry of Health, to curb the disease outbreak in question. However, I ask this good ministry to involve its officers on the ground so that they can translate what the hon. Minister has just said to the nation to the affected people. My question is: Are there any programmes that the ministry has put in place to reach the people of Chiengi, especially in Kafulwe, the fishing camp that was closed recently, about this situation? There have been many wrong assumptions, as the people in the fishing village feel that they are being punished because their Member of Parliament is from the Opposition.

 

Mr Katambo: Mr Speaker, firstly, let me commend my colleague, Hon. Dr Chilufya, the Minister of Health, for the measures that have been put in place in the area in question. Secondly, I wish to inform the hon. Member that the ministry is working closely with an inter-ministerial team that is working to control the spread of cholera in Luapula Province. So, there are sensitisation programmes on radio. The Ministry of Health is in control of the situation in the district and is ensuring that people adhere to the rules that have been put in place.

 

I thank you, Mr Speaker.

 

STATUS OF ANTHRAX OUTBREAK IN WESTERN PROVINCE

 

Mr Katambo: Mr Speaker, I thank you, again, for giving me another opportunity to issue a statement on the status of the anthrax outbreak in the Western Province, which has affected both people and cattle.

 

Sir, the outbreak of anthrax in cattle was reported in November, 2016, in five districts of the Western Province, namely Limulunga, Nalolo, Kalabo, Shangombo and Sioma. The number of cattle reported to have died from the disease anthrax was forty-six while the total of number of people who contracted the disease is sixty-seven, of which two died. Further, although the last case of anthrax in livestock was reported in December, 2016, human cases have continued due to the consumption of stored infected meat.

 

Mr Speaker, anthrax is a disease that affects all warm-blooded animals. Without treatment, it has high mortality rates.

 

Sir, the disease is caused by a bacterium called bacillus anthracis, which can last for extremely long periods, that is, up to thirty years, in the soil. The bacterium is present in the soil of the Chiawa area of Lusaka Province and most parts of the Western, North-Western and Eastern provinces, as previous outbreaks experienced in these provinces left spores of the bacterium in the soil.

 

Sir, the 2015 drought in the Western Province contributed to the anthrax outbreak because cattle were forced to graze closer to the ground, thereby picking up anthrax spores.

 

Sir, in the high-risk areas of the Western, North-Western, Eastern and Lusaka provinces, routine annual vaccination of cattle is recommended. To this effect, the Government, through Statutory Instrument No. 24 of 2014, the Animal Health Control and Prevention of Animal Disease, made vaccination of animals for anthrax mandatory. Farmers are expected to vaccinate their cattle against anthrax annually. Further, my ministry is supporting the production of anthrax vaccines at the Central Veterinary Research Institute (CVRI). The vaccines are offered to farmers at a subsidised price.

 

Mr Speaker, my ministry has put the following measures in place to contain the current outbreak of the disease:

 

  1. 41,190 herds of cattle were vaccinated in the affected veterinary camps of the affected districts;

 

  1. a ban on the movement of cattle was introduced in the affected areas to stop the spread of the disease and allow for vaccinations to be conducted; and

 

  1. public awareness campaigns were mounted through radio programmes and farmer group meetings. Farmers were advised to report any sudden death of cattle and to not consume meat from such animals.

 

Sir, these measures were effected pursuant to the Animal Health Act No. 27 of 2010 of the Laws of Zambia and were intended to guard against the spread of the disease to humans and other areas of the country. The ministry worked with other stakeholders, including the Disaster Management and Mitigation Unit (DMMU), Ministry of Health, other Government departments, civic and traditional leaders, and communities, to enhance the enforcement of these measures.

 

Sir, in conclusion, the mentioned interventions and the good rainfall received in the country, which allowed grass to grow taller, led to the containment of the outbreak in cattle in a short time. I, therefore, thank all the men and women who helped us to contain this outbreak.

 

I thank you, Sir.

 

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

 

Mr Speaker: Hon. Members, you are now free to ask questions on points of clarification on the statement issued by the hon. Minister.

 

Mr Hamusonde (Nangoma): Mr Speaker, may I find out from the hon. Minister, ...

 

Mr Mwiimbu: On a point of order, Sir.

 

Mr Speaker: A point of order is raised.

 

Mr Mwiimbu: Mr Speaker, I rise on a serious Constitutional point of order, which I have raised before against the Government of the Republic of Zambia, through Her Honour the Vice-President, on the Floor of this House.

 

Sir, I raised a point of order arising from Article 147(2) of the Constitution of Zambia and you directed Her Honour the Vice-President to address the House on the issues I had raised. However, it is almost two years now, but no member of the Executive, including Her Honour the Vice-President, has obeyed your directive for a response to that point of order.

 

Mr Speaker, for ease of reference, let me refer the House to the local authorities’ exclusive functions.

 

Sir, in the new Constitution, one of the exclusive functions of the local authorities is motor vehicle licensing. Unfortunately, this provision has not been implemented, yet the local authorities in this country have been crying that they have no resources to manage their affairs. That is why I raised the point of order.

 

Sir, I seek your serious directive or comment on the point of order I raised and the directive you issued on it.

 

Mr Speaker: I will reserve my ruling so that I can carefully study your point of order.

 

Mr Hamusonde: Mr Speaker, what is the vaccine for anthrax?

 

Mr Katambo: Mr Speaker, I will provide that information later. I cannot specify the drug right now.

 

I thank you, Sir.

 

Mr Ng’onga (Kaputa): Mr Speaker, Has the disease been contained, or is it still prevalent in these areas in the districts of the Western Province? I may not have heard the hon. Minister clearly.

 

Mr Katambo: Mr Speaker, the disease is almost at zero per cent prevalence, meaning it has been contained. When we heard that about 46,000 herds of cattle were at risk, we sent about 50,000 doses of vaccines to the Western Province, meaning that we vaccinated about 41,190 herds of cattle, as I have indicated in the statement. However, the veterinary extension officers are still vaccinating. So, the exercise is on-going.

 

I thank you, Sir.

 

________

 

QUESTIONS FOR ORAL ANSWER

 

DOCTORS AT KALOMO DISTRICT HOSPITAL

 

209. Mr Kamboni (Kalomo Central) asked the Minister of Health:

 

  1. what the staff establishment for medical doctors at Kalomo District Hospital was;

 

  1. why the hospital currently had only one doctor; and

 

  1. when additional doctors would be deployed to the hospital.

 

The Minister of Health (Dr Chilufya): Mr Speaker, Kalomo District Hospital has an establishment of five medical doctors. Currently, four doctors from the hospital are pursuing specialised training at the University of Zambia (UNZA) in order to enhance their skills. However, we have deployed two more doctors to the hospital, which will take the number of doctors there to three.

 

Mr Speaker, let me add that the Government has completed the construction of a new first-level hospital in Kalomo. As I speak, the contractor is working on the snags. By the end of April, we will open the hospital and we have already identified six doctors, thirty nurses and a few other support staff to operationalise it.

 

I thank you, Sir.

 

CLINICAL OFFICER, SECURITY GUARD AND CLEANER FOR MYOOYE CLINIC

 

210. Mr Hamusonde (Nangoma) asked the hon. Minister of Health when the following categories of staff would be deployed to Myooye Clinic in Nangoma Parliamentary Constituency:

 

  1. clinical officer;

 

  1. security guard;

 

  1. cleaner.

 

Dr Chilufya: Mr Speaker, Myooye Rural Health Centre in Nangoma Constituency has a staff establishment of nine officers, broken down as follows:

 

Staff Category                                                                                                 Number

 

Centre-in-Charge                                                                                                  1

 

Zambia Enrolled Nurse Midwife                                                                          1

 

Environmental Health Technologist                                                                     1

 

Community Health Assistant                                                                                2

 

General Worker                                                                                                     2

 

Security Guard                                                                                                      2

 

Sir, during the recent recruitment of health workers, all the positions mentioned above were filled.

 

I thank you, Mr Speaker.

 

CONSTRUCTION OF MASANGANO SECONDARY SCHOOL

 

211. Mr Kabamba (Kafulafuta) asked the Minister of General Education:

 

  1. when the construction of Masangano Secondary School would commence;

 

  1. what had caused the delay in commencing the project;

 

  1. what the total cost of the project was; and

 

  1. what the time frame for the completion of the project was.

 

The Minister of General Education (Dr Wanchinga): Mr Speaker, the construction of Masangano Secondary School will commence when the school projects currently under implementation are completed.

 

Sir, the reason for the delay was that there was non-performance on the part of the initial contractor, which led to termination of the contract. Therefore, construction was not started.

 

Sir, the initial project sum was K21 million. However, when we re-advertise the project, as we hope to do after the ministry completes most of the ongoing projects, a new cost will be determined after the tendering process is done. The old sum might not apply due to the passage of time.

 

Thank you, Mr Speaker.

 

TARRING OF MUYOMBE/ISOKA ROAD

 

212. Mr Siwale (Mafinga) asked the Minister of Housing and Infrastructure Development:

 

  1. when the tarring of Muyombe/Isoka Road would be completed; and

 

  1. what had caused the delay in completing the project.

 

The Minister of Housing and Infrastructure Development (Mr Chitotela): Mr Speaker, the Isoka/Muyombe Road Project was divided into five lots for ease of implementation. The works on Lot 1 are substantially complete while those on Lot 2 are currently ongoing, although the progress has been minimal due to financial limitations. The contracts for Lots 3, 4 and 5 have been signed and the initial completion dates are 9th June, 2017, 3rd March, 2018, and 26th July, 2017. These dates may be reviewed if the contractors request for extensions.

 

Sir, the delay in completing the project is a result of delayed payments to contractors for works done due to the fiscal challenges being faced by the country, especially in the road sector.

 

Mr Speaker, I thank you.

 

Mr Siwale: Mr Speaker, is the hon. Minister aware that the contractor has demobilised from the site and is nowhere to be seen, leading to the people of Mafinga worrying that the road might have been abandoned by this working Government?

 

Laughter

 

Mr Chitotela: Mr Speaker, as I stated earlier, the project was given to five contractors.

 

Sir, Lot 1 was given to China Civil Engineering Construction Corporation (CCECC) Zambia Limited, which has completed up to 99 per cent of the works. The project sum is K542 million.

 

Sir, Lot 2 was also given to CCECC at a cost of K396 million and the company has executed about 10 per cent of the works. Unfortunately, the works had stalled due to the Government’s failure to pay for completed works. However, the contractor is remobilising after being paid K20 million of the K45 million mobilisation fee. We want the works to start.

 

Sir, Lot 3 was given to a Chinese company at a cost of K332 million, of which we have paid K17 million of the K42 million mobilisation fee. We hope to pay the full mobilisation fee when we receive more funding from the Ministry of Finance so that the contractor can resume work. The implementation of the project is at 5 per cent progress.

 

Sir, Lot 4 was also given to CCECC Zambia Limited at a cost of K590 million.

 

Finally, Sir, Lot 5 has been given to Sable Transport Limited at a cost of K417 million and 10 per cent of the mobilisation fee has been paid to the contractor.

 

Sir, we have continued clearing our debts and paying the mobilisation fees so that all the five contractors can quickly move on site and begin working immediately after the rainy season ends so that substantial progress can be made in the implementation of the projects.

 

I thank you, Sir.

 

Mr A. C. Mumba (Kantanshi): Mr Speaker, the hon. Minister has made it very clear that the implementation of the works have due to some fiscal challenges. I am concerned about the interest and stand-alone time components of these contracts. When the Government delays to pay, the contractor is the winner because he will get his interest and stand-alone time despite doing nothing. So, what strategy has the hon. Minister put in place so that Zambians stop losing money through these contracts, since the fiscal challenges will persist?

 

Mr Chitotela: Mr Speaker, I thank the hon. Member of Parliament for Kantanshi for that question. We have discussed his concerns before.

 

Sir, the Government has put strategies in place to stop escalating project costs by engaging the contractors. After a policy directive from the Ministry of Finance, we have engaged the contractors in negotiations for them to stop charging interest on Government projects. We have also engaged financiers to make sure that we mobilise money and pay the contractors for all the project contracts that we sign in the road sector. We want all projects to be completed quickly.

 

Sir, let me take this opportunity to assure the nation that there will not be any road contract that will be terminated on account of the Government failing to pay a contractor. We have engaged the hon. Minister of Finance to help us mobilise the K4 billion we need to clear our debts to contractors so that these road projects begin benefiting the people of Zambia.

 

Mr Speaker, I thank you.

 

MBESUMA/KAFWIMBI ROAD

 

213   Mr Mukosa (Chinsali) asked the Minister of Housing and Infrastructure Development:

 

  1. whether the Government had any plans to:

 

  1. tar the road from Mbesuma in Chinsali District to Kafwimbi in Isoka District; and

 

  1. construct a bridge across Chambeshi River to connect Mbesuma to Kafwimbi;

 

  1. if so, when the plans would be implemented; and

 

  1. if there were no such plans, why?

 

Mr Chitotela: Sir, the Government has plans to upgrade to bituminous standard the road from Mbesuma in Chinsali District to Kafwimbi in Isoka District and to construct a bridge across Chambeshi River to connect Mbesuma to Kafwimbi in Isoka District.

 

Sir, the ministry intends to commence the construction of the Mbesuma Bridge in 2017, funds permitting, and we have requested Treasury authority from the hon. Minister of Finance because we have already engaged a contractor.

 

Sir, a contractor was asked to construct a tarred road up to the river, but nothing has been allocated for the construction of a bridge across the river, which is like building a road that goes nowhere. So, as a concerned Government, we have decided to construct the bridge and continue tarring the road up to Kafwimbi this year. However, this is subject to the finalisation of the financial terms with the Ministry of Finance and the financiers, although, as I stated earlier, I have had positive discussions with the hon. Minister of Finance, who has committed himself to mobilising funds for us to begin the works.

 

Mr Speaker, for the information of the House, when we visited the Northern Province, His Royal Highness Chief Chitimukulu raised the issue of this road in our discussions.

 

I thank you, Sir.

 

Mr Mukosa: Mr Speaker, I thank the Government of His Excellency President Edgar Chagwa Lungu for the good plans.

 

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

 

Mr Ngulube: Ema President.

 

Mr Mukosa: That said, what is the name of the contractor who has been identified for the project?

 

Mr Chitotela: Mr Speaker, my ministry and the Ministry of Finance agreed to let China Geo-Engineering Corporation (CGC), which built the road, build the bridge, too. We will make a variation order to the road contract.

 

I thank you, Sir.

 

MOFWE LAGOON BRIDGES

 

214   Mr Ng’onga (Kaputa) asked the Minister of Housing and Infrastructure Development:

 

  1. when bridges across the Mofwe Lagoon on the Mukunsa to Mununga Road in Kaputa District were constructed; and

 

  1. whether the Government had any plans to rehabilitate the bridges

 

Mr Chitotela: Mr Speaker, the bridges were constructed in the early 1990s.

 

Sir, the Road Development Agency (RDA) has varied the contract for the Kasama/Mporokoso Road to include the periodic maintenance and rehabilitation of bridges along the Mofwe Lagoon on the Mukunsa/Mununga Road. The contract was awarded to Messrs Sable Transport Limited.

 

I thank you, Sir.

 

Mr Ng’onga: Mr Speaker, the bridges were obviously in a better condition when constructed in the 1990s than they are now. Has the contractor been able to work on the bridge? If so, when is he contractor expected to complete the works? I am trying to get a commitment from my hon. Minister.

 

Mr Chitotela: Mr Speaker, yes, Messrs Sable Transport Limited has been carrying out routine maintenance works on the bridge. I know that because I have driven on the road. However, we will still speak to the contractor in order to establish when exactly the bridges will be attended to next and get back to the hon. Member of Parliament. The periodic maintenance carried out on the road includes the bridges.

 

Sir, we should be able to work on the bridges within the year.

 

I thank you, Sir.

 

WATER RETICULATION SYSTEM FOR CHIENGE DISTRICT

 

215   Ms Katuta (Chienge) asked the Minister of Water Development, Sanitation and Environmental Protection:

 

  1. whether the Government had any plans to construct a water reticulation system in Chienge District;

 

  1. if so, when the plans would be implemented;

 

  1. what the source of the water would be; and

 

  1. if there were no such plans, why.

 

The Minister of Water Development, Sanitation and Environmental Protection (Mr Kaziya): Mr Speaker, yes, the Government has plans to construct a water reticulation system in Chienge District.

 

Sir, the implementation of the project has been planned for in the 2017 Annual Work Plan (AWP), once funds are released from the Treasury.

 

Sir, the source of water will be Lake Mweru.

 

I thank you, Sir.

 

Ms Katuta: Mr Speaker, a company was supposed to implement the project a couple of years ago, but nothing has been done to date. Further, the hon. Minister says that the source of water will be Lake Mweru. Is he aware that the water was initially supposed to be drawn from the Kalungwishi River?

 

Mr Kaziya: Mr Speaker, the Kalungwishi River will not provide us with good quality water because its water contains a minimal amount of iron. Therefore, we fell back on Lake Mweru, which has cleaner water.

 

I thank you, Sir.

 

HUMAN-ANIMAL CONFLICT IN LIVINGSTONE

 

216   Mr Jere (Livingstone) asked the Minister of Tourism and Arts what measures the Government was taking to combat the human/animal conflict in Livingstone.

 

The Minister of Tourism and Arts (Mr C. Banda): Mr Speaker, the Patriotic Front (PF) Government is very consistent. It does not change answers.

 

Mr Livune: Question!

 

Mr C. Banda: Sir, this question has been asked on this Floor before, but due to absenteeism, some of our colleagues have not been able to get the answers that were provided. I, therefore, urge hon. Members to perform stay in the House, which is their duty, so that they can benefit from the answers that we give them,.

 

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

 

Mr C. Banda: Mr Speaker, for the benefit of the people of Livingstone, who seem to have inadequate representation, …

 

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

 

Mr C. Banda: … the following is the response.

 

Laughter

 

Mr Speaker: Order, hon. Minister! 

 

Mr C. Banda: Sir, human-wildlife conflict is dealt with …

 

Mr Speaker: Order, hon. Minister!

 

There was absolutely no need for that reference.

 

Continue.

 

Mr C. Banda: Mr Speaker, I thank you for that guidance.

 

Sir, human-wildlife conflict is dealt with as and when it arises. The animals mostly responsible for the conflict are elephants and hippos, which usually traverse the areas of human settlement in the district and a team of wildlife police officers that has been assigned to specifically deal with the problem is always on standby for deployment.

 

Sir, problem animals are chased by blasting or firing blank ammunition in the air. Usually, that does the trick and the animals may not go back for some time or may not return at all during a given season. If the two options fail, the animals are killing using live ammunition. For example, in January, 2017, a hippo that had been destroying crops in Libuyu area was killed by wildlife police officers to save the crops.

 

Mr Speaker, in 2013, the Government, through the Zambia Wildlife Authority (ZAWA), constructed a fence around the park to prevent animals from getting to the communities and, thereby reduce human-wildlife conflict. Although elephants and buffalo sometimes bring down sections of the fence, the measure has greatly reduced human-wildlife conflict. In addition, the Department of National Parks and Wildlife is working in collaboration with a non-governmental organisation (NGO) called Green Rural African Development (GRAD), which is helping to prevent human-wildlife conflict in the district by installing basic solar fences around communities to deter animals from accessing people’s fields or homes. The animals mainly targeted are elephants and hippos. The NGO is self-funded and has been operating in the district for about four years now, and its project has largely been a success, having benefited about 45,000 people in the rural areas of the district.

 

Sir, Livingstone is the tourist capital of Zambia and the ministry encourages the local communities to live harmoniously with wildlife, which is one of the main tourist attractions. Nevertheless, the ministry is also aware that most rural households depend on farming for their livelihoods. Thus, there is a need to strike a balance between conservation and rural livelihood support.

 

I thank you, Sir.

 

ESTABLISHMENT OF RTSA OFFICE IN CHINSALI

 

217. Mr Mukosa asked the Minister of Transport and Communication:

 

  1. whether the Government had any plans to establish a regional office for the Road Transport and Safety Agency in Chinsali District;

 

  1. if so, when the plans would be implemented; and

 

  1. if there were no such plans, why.

 

The Minister of Works and Supply (Mr Nkhuwa) (on behalf of The Minister of Transport and Communication (Mr Mushimba)): Mr Speaker, yes, the Government has plans to construct a regional office for the Road Transport and Safety Agency (RTSA), including a motor vehicle inspection centre, in Chinsali.

 

Mr Speaker, the construction of the office is scheduled to commence in 2017. The contract was signed and the sites handed over to the contractors in 2016.

 

Mr Speaker, I thank you.

 

Mr Mukosa: Mr Speaker, is it possible for the ministry to consider opening a temporary office to provide road tax and vehicle fitness certificates to car owners pending the construction of an office?

 

Mr Nkhuwa: Mr Speaker, our Government is a listening one. As such, it has taken note of that suggestion and will definitely consider it.

 

I thank you, Sir.

 

ERADICATION OF CORRIDOR DISEASE

 

218. Mr Hamusonde asked the Minister of Fisheries and Livestock what measures the Government was taking to eradicate corridor disease in the country.

 

The Minister of Fisheries and Livestock (Mr Katambo): Mr Speaker, corridor disease or East Coast Fever, commonly known as chigondola in the Eastern Province or denkete in the Southern Province, is a tick-borne disease caused by the Theileria parva parasite.

 

Sir, it should be noted that the eradication of corridor disease is practically impossible due to the persistent presence in the environment of ticks and numerous reservoir hosts that include wildlife. The disease is currently reported in Central, the Copperbelt, the Eastern, Lusaka, Muchinga, the Northern, the Southern and the North-Western provinces with an average prevalence of 3 per cent. Luapula and the Western provinces are the only ones that have not reported the disease.

 

Mr Speaker, the Ministry of Fisheries and Livestock is taking the following measures to control the corridor disease:

 

Tick Control, through Dipping, Spraying and Application of Pour-ons.

 

Sir, the ministry has embarked on the construction of new dip tanks and rehabilitation of old ones to enable cattle farmers to dip their animals and, hence, prevent the disease. So far, the ministry has constructed fifty-nine dip tanks and rehabilitated 139, taking the total to 198. The ministry also provides the initial dip chemicals to farmers to enable them start up a cost recovery system. Dip cost recovery ensures the sustainability of the dipping exercise.

 

Extension Services

 

Sir, my ministry gives out information on the disease and its control through extension services by veterinarians and livestock assistants, and sensitisation in local communities with the assistance of traditional leaders. Farmers are encouraged to buy theilericides for treating animals that get infected by corridor diseases, as only animals that are treated early in the course of the disease can recover.

 

Immunisation of Calves Using Strain-Specific Stabilates (Chitongo in the Southern Province and Katete in Eastern Province).

 

Mr Speaker, the ministry conducts two rounds of vaccination of calves in the Eastern and Southern provinces every year. The first round is conducted between April and May while the second is conducted between September and October.

 

Control of Cattle Movement

 

Mr Speaker, the ministry regulates the movement of cattle across the country. In this regard, cattle from corridor disease-affected areas are not permitted to move to disease-free zones. This is done through issuance of stock movement permits and veterinary check points to prevent the disease from spreading to disease-free areas or to prevent one strain from reaching areas where they are not present. For example, the Chitongo Strain is found in Southern Province, not in the Eastern Province, while the Katete Strain is found in the Eastern Province, not in the Southern Province. By law, no animals are allowed to move from one area to another without a stock movement permit.

 

East Coast Fever Control Strategy

 

Mr Speaker, my ministry has also developed an East Coast Fever (ECF) Control Strategy which, apart from the measures outlined above, also looks at deep chemical analysis conducted at the Central Veterinary Research Institute (CVRI). Included in the strategy is the research into the strains of the ECF circulating in Lusaka, Central, Copperbelt, Muchinga and the Northern provinces. Depending on the results of the survey, the vaccination of cattle against the disease might be extended to the mentioned provinces.

 

Sir, the research will be concluded by end of 2017.

 

Mr Speaker, I thank you.

 

___________

 

BILLS

 

HOUSE IN COMMITTEE

 

[THE CHAIRPERSON OF COMMITTEES in the Chair]

 

THE COMPULSORY STANDARDS BILL, 2017

 

Clauses 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, and 33 ordered to stand part of the Bill.

 

First and Second Schedules ordered to stand part of the Bill.

 

Title agreed to.

 

THE STANDARDS BILL, 2017

 

Clauses 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 ordered to stand part of the Bill.

 

CLAUSE 6 – (Board of Bureau)

 

The Minister of Commerce, Trade and Industry (Mrs Mwanakatwe): Madam Chairperson, I beg to move an amendment in Clause 6, on page 9:

 

  1. in line 38, by the deletion of the word “and”; and

 

  1. in lines 39 and 40, by the deletion of paragraph (c) and the substitution therefor of the following:

 

(c)     two persons representing manufacturers and chambers of commerce, respectively; and

 

  •  

 

Amendment agreed to. Clause amended accordingly.

 

Clause 6, as amended, ordered to stand part of the Bill.

 

Clauses 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36 and 37 ordered to stand part of the Bill.

 

First and Second Schedules ordered to stand part of the Bill.

 

Title agreed to.

 

THE NATIONAL TECHNICAL REGULATION BILL, 2017

 

Clause 1 ordered to stand part of the Bill.

 

Clause 2 – (Interpretation)

 

Mrs Mwanakatwe: Madam Chairperson, I beg to move an amendment in Clause 2, on page 7, after line 26, by the insertion of the following new definition:

 

“pre-market approval” means the scientific and regulatory review of a commodity by the regulatory agency responsible for enforcing standards to which that commodity is subject in order to establish that commodity’s safety and effectiveness before its approval for the market”.

 

Amendment agreed to. Clause amended accordingly.

 

Clause 2, as amended, ordered to stand part of the Bill.

 

Clauses 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23 and 24 ordered to stand part of the Bill.

 

Title agreed to.

 

THE METROLOGY BILL, 2017

 

Clauses 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 ordered to stand part of the Bill.

 

CLAUSE 7 – (Board of Agency)

 

Mrs Mwanakatwe: Madam Chairperson, I beg to move an amendment in Clause 7, on page 17:

  1. in line 23, by the deletion of the word “and”; and

 

  1. in lines 24 and 25, by the deletion of paragraph (c) and the substitution therefor of the following;

 

  •  

 

  1.         a representative of higher education institutions nominated by the Minister responsible for higher education; and

 

  1.         three persons with experience and knowledge in matters relevant to this Act.”

 

Amendment agreed to. Clause amended accordingly.

 

Clause 7, as amended, ordered to stand part of the Bill.

 

Clauses 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14 ordered to stand part of the Bill.

 

Clause 15 – (National measurement standards)

 

Mrs Mwanakatwe: Madam Chairperson, I beg to move an amendment in Clause 15, on page 20, in lines 16 to 18, by the deletion of paragraph (b) and the substitution therefor of the following:

 

  •  

 

Amendment agreed to. Clause amended accordingly.

 

Clause 15, as amended, ordered to stand part of the Bill.

 

Clauses 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28 and 29 ordered to stand part of the Bill.

 

Clause 30 – (Registration and responsibilities of pre-packaging companies)

 

Mrs Mwanakatwe: Madam Chairperson, I beg to move an amendment in Clause 30, on page 28, in line 32, by the insertion of the words, “…within fourteen days from the date of application for registration as a supplier of pre-packaged goods” immediately after the word “accordingly”.

 

Amendment agreed to. Clause amended accordingly.

 

Clause 30, as amended, ordered to stand part of the Bill.

 

Clauses 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58 and 59 ordered to stand part of the Bill.

 

CLAUSE 60 (Repeal of Cap 403 Act No. 22 of 1994)

 

Mrs Mwanakatwe: Madam Speaker, I beg to move an amendment in Clause 60, on page 41:

 

  1. in line 11, by the insertion of the figure “(1)” after the figure “60”; and

 

  1. after line 11, by the insertion of the following:

 

“(2)      Despite sub-section (1), the Second Schedule applies to the savings and transitional arrangements.”

 

Amendment agreed to. Clause amended accordingly.

 

Clause 60, as amended, ordered to stand part of the Bill.

 

First Schedule ordered to stand part of the Bill.

 

SECOND SCHEDULE

 

Mrs Mwanakatwe: Madam Speaker, I beg to move an amendment in the Second Schedule, on page 47, by the deletion of the figure “54” and the substitution therefor of the figure “60(2)”.

 

Amendment agreed to. The Schedule amended accordingly.

 

Second Schedule, as amended, ordered to stand part of the Bill.

 

Title agreed to.

 

________

 

HOUSE RESUMED

 

[MR SPEAKER in the Chair]

 

The following Bill was reported to the House as having passed through Committee without amendments:

 

The Compulsory Standards Bill, 2017

 

Third Reading on Friday, 24th March. 2017.

 

The following Bills were reported to the House as having passed through Committee with amendments:

 

The Standards Bill, 2017

 

The National Technical Regulation Bill, 2017

 

The Metrology Bill, 2017

 

Report Stages on Friday, 24th March, 2017.

 

THIRD READING

 

The following Bills were read the third time and passed:

 

The Refugees Bill, 2017

 

The Agriculture Institute of Zambia Bill, 2017

 

_________

 

MOTION

 

ADJOURNMENT

 

The Chief Whip and Acting Leader of Government Business in the House (Mr Musukwa): Mr Speaker, I beg to move that the House do now adjourn.

 

Question put and agreed to.

_____

 

The House adjourned at 1623 hours until 0900 hours on Friday, 24th March, 2017.