Parliament is sitting. Parliament Radio Frequencies- Lusaka 92.5fm, KapiriMposh 91.3fm, Kitwe 94.1fm, Solwezi 93.3fm, Kasama 91.5fm, Mansa 91.5fm, Mongu 98.1fm, Chipata 95.7fm, Pemba 105.5fm and Livingstone 100.5fm
The Speaker
The Speaker
The Deputy Speaker
The Sergeant-At-Arms
The Deputy Chairman
Speakers since 1948
Find your MP!
Main Menu
Home
What's New
Constitution and Laws
Office of the Clerk
National Assembly
Tenders
Links
Search
Contact Us
Usage policy
Vacancies
1st Draft Constitution 2012
2nd Draft Consititution 2013
Speakers/Presiding Officer
SADC Region
Africa
CPA International
CPA Africa Region
Related Links
SADC-PF
CPA Africa Region
IPU
SADCOPAC
SADC-PF Conference
Climate Parliament
CPA Headquaters
CommonWealth
United Nations- NEWS
Who's Online
We have 9 guests online

Committed to the fight against HIV/AIDS
line Home Thursday, 18 December 2014  
line
 
Debates - Tuesday, 21st February, 2012 PDF Print E-mail
Wednesday, 29 February 2012
DAILY PARLIAMENTARY DEBATES FOR THE FIRST SESSION OF THE ELEVENTH ASSEMBLY
Tuesday, 21st February, 2012

The House met at 1430 hours

[MR SPEAKER in the Chair]

NATIONAL ANTHEM

PRAYER

__________

OATH OF ALLEGIANCE

The following Members took and subscribed the Oath of Allegiance:

Charles Romeo Banda

Colonel Joseph Lungu

__________
                                                                           
ANNOUNCEMENTS BY MR SPEAKER

REPLACEMENT OF HONOURABLE KAZUNGA ON SESSIONAL COMMITTEES

Mr Speaker: In accordance with Standing Order No. 133 (3), I have replaced Hon. D. Kazunga, MP, with Mr L. Katombora, MP, on the following Sessional Committees:

(i)    Committee on Government Assurances; and

(ii)    Committee on Local Governance, Housing, Environment and Chiefs’ Affairs.

APPOINTMENT OF HONOURABLE SYLVIA T. MASEBO TO THE PAN-AFRICAN PARLIAMENT

Mr Speaker: Following the appointment of Hon. Dorothy Kazunga, MP, as Deputy Minister in the Ministry of Community Development, Mother and Child Health, I wish to inform the House that Mrs Sylvia T. Masebo, MP, has been appointed to replace her as a Member of the Pan-African Parliament.

I thank you.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

__________

BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE

The Vice-President (Dr Scott): Mr Speaker, I rise to acquaint the House with the Business it will consider this week. However, before I do that, let me begin by welcoming all hon. Members to this meeting dedicated to the consideration and passing of legislation in the First Session of the Eleventh National Assembly. I do hope that all hon. Members are now fully acquainted with Parliamentary Procedure and, as such, are geared for more hard work in this august House in order to meet the expectations of the people of Zambia. As we are all aware, Mr Speaker, the expectations are there and very prominent at the moment. Let me now turn back to the Business of the House.

Sir, today, Tuesday, 21st February, 2012, as indicated on the Order Paper, the House will deal with Questions only.

Mr Speaker, on Wednesday, 22nd February, 2012, the Business of the House will begin with Questions, if there will be any. This will be followed by presentation of Government Bills, if there will be any. Thereafter, the House will consider Private Member’s Motions, if there will be any.

Mr Speaker, on Thursday, 23rd February, 2012, the Business of the House will begin with Questions, if there will be any. This will be followed by presentation of Government Bills, if there will be any. As hon. Members are aware, on this day, I intend to also move a Motion to suspend the relevant Standing Orders to enable the House to sit in the afternoon on Friday, 24th February, 2012. This is to facilitate the visit and Special Address to our Parliament by the United Nations Secretary-General, His Excellency, Mr Ban Ki Moon.

Sir, on Friday, 24th February, 2012, the Business of the House will commence with Questions, if there will be any. The House will, thereafter, deal with presentation of Government Bills, if there will be any. This will be followed by a Special Address to the House by the United Nations Secretary General, His Excellency, Mr Ban Ki Moon. The House will then debate a Motion of Thanks in response to the Special Address by the United Nations Secretary-General, which will be moved by His Honour the Vice-President.

I thank you, Mr Speaker.

_________

QUESTIONS FOR ORAL ANSWER

KARAVINAS IN LUKULU WEST CONSTITUENCY

65. Mr Mutelo (Lukulu West) asked the Minister of Home Affairs:

(a)    what measures the Government had taken to arrest criminals, commonly known as karavinas, who have been killing people and thus causing great insecurity in Lukulu West Parliamentary Constituency;

(b)    whether the Government had any plans to build a police post in the constituency in order to improve the security situation and, if so, when the police post would be built;

(c)    whether the Government was aware that some schools in Lukulu West Parliamentary Constituency had been deserted due to insecurity caused by the karavinas; and

(d)    what measures had been taken to enable the teachers to return to their schools.

 The Deputy Minister of Home Affairs (Mr Mwaliteta): Mr Speaker, I wish to inform the House that, in view of the security situation in Lukulu West Parliamentary Constituency, the Government has provided a new motor vehicle and additional police officers to intensify investigations and patrols so that the perpetrators of the criminal activities are brought to book. Furthermore, the Zambia Police Service is working closely with the local community through the neighbourhood watch and the amnesty programme in which people who surrender illegal firearms are rewarded with K500,000 for each firearm surrendered. This mechanism saw the police recover ten AK47 rifles and two muzzle loaders in 2011.

Mr Speaker, the Government acknowledges the poor state of police infrastructure not only in Lukulu West Parliamentary Constituency, but also in many parts of the country. The Ministry of Home Affairs has, therefore, come up with a draft infrastructure plan to address the poor state of police infrastructure. The hon. Member is informed that, in line with the five-year plan, Lukulu West Parliamentary Constituency is one of the identified areas that will benefit once funds are available.

Mr Speaker, the Government is aware of the insecurity in Lukulu West Parliamentary Constituency that has led to the closure of Mbumbi Basic School. The police have since arrested some people in connection with the 2009 shooting incident in which a teacher was shot and killed at Kasenda Basic School. Furthermore, two other suspects have been arrested in connection with the incident that occurred on 18th November, 2011 in which a security guard was shot dead at Mbumbi Basic School and investigations are going on.

Sir, the Government has enhanced the amnesty programme and incorporated the community in security operations in the area to ensure that security prevails in Lukulu West and all residents, including the teachers, participate freely in social and economic activities.

Mr Speaker, I thank you.

Mr Muntanga (Kalomo Central): Mr Speaker, arising from the hon. Minister’s answer, and realising that he finds it necessary, as one of the measures to control crime, to provide transport in the form of one vehicle to Lukulu West, may I know, when he will provide a vehicle to places such as Sinazongwe and Kalomo where insecurity is very high because there are bakanjani.

Mr Mwaliteta: Mr Speaker, the vehicles will be provided to all parts of the country when the funds are available. The hon. Member of Parliament should not worry because we are going to look into that.

I thank you, Sir.

Mr Kakoma (Zambezi West): Mr Speaker, the original motive of the Karavinas was to shoot dead witches and wizards. Of late, the trend appears to be different. They are, now, targeting school children and teachers. Has the Government established why these Karavinas are, now, attacking innocent citizens?

The Minister of Home Affairs (Mr Sakeni): Mr Speaker, Karavinas are criminals who target any person and the police are handling them as such. We will do everything possible to bring them to book.

I thank you, Sir.

Dr Kalila (Lukulu East): Mr Speaker, the issue of Karavinas has been going on for many years and, quite clearly, the police have failed to stem this very unfortunate situation. Is the Government considering the use of the military to bring this scourge to an end, once and for all?

Mr Sakeni: Mr Speaker, we are on top of things. As you are aware, a number of suspects are in detention in relation to the same issues in the Western Province. As far as the Government is concerned, we cannot, at this stage, bring in the military. This is a matter that the police, of course, in collaboration with our people, can deal with. There is no way the police can fight crime without the people’s participation. I urge the hon. Members of Parliament for constituencies in which this crime is more pronounced to help the police identify the culprits because they live in their communities.

I thank you, Sir.

NANGOMA SCHOOL IN LUKULU WEST CONSTITUENCY

66. Mr Mutelo asked the Minister of Education, Science and Vocational Training when the roof of a 1 x 3 classroom block at Nangoma School in Lukulu West Parliamentary Constituency, which was blown off during a thunderstorm in November, 2011, would be repaired.

The Deputy Minister of Education, Science and Vocational Training (Mr Mabumba): Mr Speaker, the Ministry of Education, Science and Vocational Training is aware of several disasters that occurred in schools, including blown-off roofs. In this regard, resources have been allocated, in the 2012 Budget to mitigate the impact of such disasters. Nangoma School in Lukulu West Parliamentary Constituency will, therefore, be considered for resource allocation in 2012.

I thank you, Sir.
   
Mr Muntanga: Mr Speaker, the hon. Minister indicated that the Government is aware that several roofs in schools were blown off and that resources have been allocated for their rehabilitation. May I know when resources will be allocated for the four schools whose roofs were blown off in Kalomo two years ago?

The Minister of Education, Science and Vocational Training (Dr Phiri): Mr Speaker, although this is a new question from the hon. Member, may it please him to learn that all the schools recorded to have had this misfortune will be allocated resources using the 2012 budgetary allocation to the ministry.

I thank you, Sir.

Mr Mutelo: Mr Speaker, Nangoma School closed in November, 2011. To date, even after reopening, pupils are not learning in an environment that is conducive. Can the Disaster Management and Mitigation Unit (DMMU) not be of any help?

Dr Phiri: Mr Speaker, we are not aware that pupils are learning in the kind of environment described by the hon. Member. However, let me assure this House that serious efforts are being made to address the situation.

Mr Speaker, concerning the issue of whether the DMMU is aware of this situation, I am not able to say. I cannot answer on their behalf.

Mr Speaker, I thank you.

Professor Lungwangwa (Nalikwanda): Mr Speaker, could the hon. Minister of Education, Science and Vocational Training specify to the nation how much money has been allocated to the repair of blown-off school roofs countrywide?

Hon. MMD Member: He is not aware!

Mr Speaker: Order!

Let the hon. Minister respond.

Dr Phiri: Mr Speaker, the allocated amount is K5 billion. Furthermore, we are working out the necessary measures to repair all the schools that have reported this mishap.

I thank you, Sir.

Hon. Government Members:  Hear, hear!{mospagebreak}

FORMER ZCCM TRUST SCHOOLS

67. Mr M. Mumba (Mambilima) asked the Minister of Education, Science and Vocational Training:

(a)    how many trust schools were owned by the Zambia Consolidated Copper Mines (ZCCM) at the time of its privatisation;

(b)    of the schools above, how many were sold without following laid down procedures;
   
(c)    what the way forward for such schools was; and

(d)    of the schools at (b), how many had politicians serving as members of the schools boards.

Mr Mabumba: Mr Speaker, the ZCCM owned eight trust schools at the time of its privatisation.
   
Mr Speaker, of the schools mentioned above, only one school, namely Ndola Trust School, was sold without following the laid-down procedures.

Sir, Ndola Trust School is, currently, operating under a board of six members and the issue is being handled by the Zambia Development Agency. 

Lastly, as far as we are concerned, there are no politicians sitting on the board of the school that was sold without following the laid-down procedures.

Mr Speaker, I thank you. 

ELECTRIFICATION OF MUSHINDAMO/KIPUSHI BORDER AREA

70. Mr Taima (Solwezi East) asked the Minister of Lands, Energy and Water Development when the Government would connect the Mushindamo/Kipushi Border area in Solwezi East Parliamentary Constituency to the National Electricity Grid in order to accelerate development in the area.

The Deputy Minister of Lands, Energy and Water Development (Mr C. Zulu): Mr Speaker, Mushindamo, including the Kipushi area, is a rural growth centre (RGC), which has been earmarked for electrification in the Rural Electrification Master Plan (REMP).

Mushindamo/Kipushi is about 100 km from the Solwezi Sub-station where the power line should be extended from. Although the electrification of Mushindamo was scheduled for implementation in 2011, the project could not start due to budgetary constraints. In 2011, a technical survey to ascertain the cost of carrying out the project so as to establish whether it could be included in the 2012 Work Plan was made. It was, however, discovered that the project was not feasible because the source has only 11KV, which can only allow line transmission of up to a distance of 30 km. The hon. Member of Parliament for Solwezi East should, also, acknowledge that in 2011, my Government, through the Rural Electrification Authority, started implementing a rural electrification project that covers parts of Solwezi East. For example, Kang’wena Basic School in Mutenda area is one of the schools that are covered under the Luano 1 Project, which also includes public facilities in Chingola District. The project was handed over to the contractor in August, 2011 at a cost of K6.2 billion, and will be completed in May, 2012.

Mr Speaker, I thank you. 

Mr Ntundu (Gwembe): Mr Speaker, I seek clarification from the hon. Minister. Is the Patriotic Front (PF) Government stating that it is not interested in electrifying the area in question? Can the hon. Minister clarify this?

Mr C. Zulu: Mr Speaker, we have always said that the intention of the ministry is to electrify all areas, including rural areas.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Mr C. Zulu: The Mushindamo/Kipushi area is 100 km from Solwezi and the 11 KV can only go up to 30 km. We are, therefore, looking at other options, such as solar installations. Electrifying this area will cost us K25 billion to K30 billion. This is why we are looking at other options and solar installation is option number one.

I thank you, Sir.

Mr Taima: Mr Speaker, from the outset, the hon. Minister was very clear that Mushindamo is a rural growth centre identified by the Government and was earmarked for electrification in 2011. He further said that feasibility studies proved that electrifying the area was not feasible. This, obviously, worries me because this is an area …

Hon. Government Member: Ask your question.

Mr Taima: I will quickly get to my question. I am just building it up. This area is a life line for Solwezi East Constituency in terms of development and, in line with the good policy of this Government of turning administratively disadvantaged areas into districts, it might be a district soon. Will it be run on solar power if it becomes a district?

Laughter

The Minister of Lands, Energy and Water Development (Mr Yaluma): Mr Speaker, Mushindamo or Kipushi could be run on solar.

Mr Mukanga: Yes!

Mr Yaluma: Technology has proved that it is possible to run a 10MVA solar station and Mushindano does not require one that big. It requires about 500KVA. Therefore, we can run Mushindamo on solar power.

I thank you, Sir.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Pande (Kasempa): Mr Speaker, the hon. Minister has indicated that the Government will use solar power to electrify Mushindamo. When exactly will the solar power be introduced in Mushindamo?

Mr Yaluma: Mr Speaker, I would like to bring to the attention of the House that the feasibility study that was undertaken was not very concise as it did not address the needs of Mushindamo. Fortunately, we now know which technology to use to electrify Mushindamo and Kipushi.

I thank you, Mr Speaker.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Namulambe (Mpongwe): Mr Speaker, if I heard the hon. Minister correctly, he indicated that the electrification of Mushindamo is in a master plan of some kind. However, the hon. Member of Parliament for Solwezi East is asking whether this place will be connected to the national grid. Is it impossible to upgrade the station in Solwezi so that this area is connected to the national grid?

Mr Yaluma: Mr Speaker, I think that is a new question, but I will address it. You are aware that some parts of the North-Western Province such as Mwinilunga are not connected to the grid. If it makes sense to connect Mushindamo to the grid, then let us do it.

I thank you, Sir.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Mwiimbu (Monze Central): Mr Speaker, arising from the answers that have been given by the hon. Minister that, before any electrification is done in any particular area, a feasibility study is supposed to be made, may I know whether feasibility studies were carried out in Msanzala and Chongwe where pronouncements were made that the villages in these areas be electrified.

Hon. Government Members: Question!

Mr Mwiimbu: Further, have the villages in the two places been electrified?

Interruptions

Mr Yaluma: Mr Speaker, that is a new question. Can we have it next time so that we can address it accordingly.

I thank you, Sir.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Muntanga: Mr Speaker, taking into account what is contained in the master plan or whatever it is called, can the hon. Minister confirm that there are some areas that have been identified as not feasible for electrification and, if that is the case, which areas are targeted to be sidelined in Zambia?

Mr Yaluma: Mr Speaker, there is a very well-structured process that is followed when compiling a master plan. The information that goes into the master plan comes from the district councils’ planning units. The input is deliberated so that the proposals are coherent and all the needs of their areas covered. Thus, whatever is contained in the master plan comes from your own areas.

I thank you, Mr Speaker.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Dr Kalila: Mr Speaker, my question is very simple. When will Mushindamo be connected to solar power as has been suggested?

Mr Yaluma: Mr Speaker, I respect the hon. Member of Parliament for Lukulu East.

Hon. MMD Member: You respect everybody!

Mr Yaluma: Thank you.

Laughter

Mr Yaluma: Mr Speaker, as has been already stated, the electrification of Mushindamo is in the master plan. What is in the master plan is not, currently, addressing the needs of Mushindamo accurately. Therefore, that feasibility study has fallen away. We, now, have a new plan that will make it possible to electrify Mushindamo with solar power. According to this plan, Mushindamo will be provided with power next year.

I thank you, Sir.

Mr Kakoma: Mr Speaker, can the hon. Minister clearly satisfy my curiosity about the solar power which will be provided to Mushindamo. Is it going to be enough to power a water pump and treatment plant? I have never seen such technology at work in Zambia. Is it now available?

Mr Yaluma: Mr Speaker, in my explanation, I said that there is now technology that can be used to address the needs of Mushindamo. I further said that there is technology that can produce up to 20MVA of solar power. That amount of energy can power Solwezi, Mwinilunga, Kabompo and Zambezi.

I thank you, Mr Speaker.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Ms Sayifwanda (Zambezi East): Mr Speaker, in his response, the hon. Minister mentioned Mwinilunga and, personally, I feel that is already a confirmation that Mushindamo will be provided with electricity by the Government. May I know when this will happen.

Mr Yaluma: Mr Speaker, can I be allowed to speak or emphasise what I said earlier in an alternative language …

Laughter

Mr Speaker: I am afraid I will not permit you.

Laughter

Mr Yaluma: Nonetheless, …

Mr Muntanga: Which language?

Mr Yaluma: I am very conversant with the languages used by the hon. Members over there (pointing at UPND hon. Members). I worked in that area for a long time. Nonetheless, in response to the question raised by the hon. Member of Parliament for Lukulu East, I explicitly explained that Mushindamo will be provided with electricity next year.

Lieutenant-General Shikapwasha (Keembe): Mr Speaker, I am happy that the hon. Minister has given a target time. For any project to succeed, there is a need to have a timeframe for its implementation. I am happy that the hon. Minister has said that Mushindamo will be provided with electricity next year.

Mr Speaker: The hon. Member for Chembe.

Mbulakulima (Chembe): Mr Speaker, can the hon. Minister come out clearly on this matter once more. Is Mushindamo going to be connected to the national grid or will it be subjected to solar energy?

Interruptions

Mr Speaker: I think that question has already been answered.

 Hon. PF Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Mutati (Lunte): Mr Speaker, the Rural Electrification Master Plan (REMP) is, in itself, a feasibility report that indicates the priorities and methods of electrification. Therefore, is there be any need to have another feasibility study beside it?

Mr Yaluma: Mr Speaker, I understand what the hon. Member means, but I want to make it clear that, when any project is being designed, its scope is not always limited. This is because, as you go on designing, you look at more economically feasible ways of doing it and adopt that. However, if you remain fixated, then you might not achieve what you want to. If the hon. Member wants to tell us that we should go ahead and pay US$30 billion to take a 66 KV power line to Mushindamo, then I rest my case.

I thank you, Sir.

Mr M. H. Malama (Mfuwe): Mr Speaker, for twenty years, the Movement for Multi-Party Democracy (MMD) lamentably failed to connect the North-Western Province to the national grid. Therefore, I would like to find out from the hon. Minister within the four months of being in the Government, what plans we have put in place to do what they failed to do so that the people in Mushindamo can benefit.

Hon. PF Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Lubinda: Ndiye ma question aya.

Mr Yaluma: Mr Speaker, we are all aware of the ambitious programmes that are being implemented in the North-Western Province. Today, as we speak, the province is a hive of activities. There are mines opening up left, right and centre and we can say it is the new Copperbelt of Zambia. As such, we feel that it is important that we link the North-Western Province to the national grid.

As I speak to you, we are going ahead with the creation of a ring road with an in-feed from the Western Province and create an 800 km link to Mwinilunga, Zambezi and Lukulu. This connection will make an open point so that, whichever way, we can alternatively turn and avail supply continuously to the people of the Western and North-Western provinces. This is on the cards.

I thank you, Sir.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Simbao (Senga Hill): Mr Speaker, I just want to find out from the hon. Minister if the ministry has made a cost-comparison between the provision of solar power of 25 MVA and what it is planning. I would also like to know why the ministry is not considering taking 33 KV to this area, instead of looking at 66 KV.

Mr Yaluma: Mr Speaker, I would like to correct Hon. Simbao. I did not say 25 KVA, 66 KVA or 33 KVA. I said that we will either construct a power line of 66 KV, not 66 KVA, or 33 KV and not 33 KVA. I did not speak about any of the things he has mentioned. Therefore, I cannot answer that question.

I thank you, Sir.

Hon. PF Members: Hear, hear!

Mrs Masebo (Chongwe): Mr Speaker, since there was reference to Chongwe, I want to ask the hon. Minister whether it is not right to say that the Fifth National Development Plan (FNDP) and Six National Development Plan (SNDP) indicated that, in fact, the entire Chongwe District should have been electrified. However, it was sidelined by the previous administration and, now, the Patriotic Front (PF) is only doing what it is expected to do. Can the hon. Minister confirm that.

Hon. PF Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Yaluma: Mr Speaker, I concur with Hon. Masebo’s assessment of the situation.

I thank you, Sir.

Laughter

SHANG’OMBO DISTRICT HOSPITAL

71.    Mr Njeulu (Sinjembela) asked the Minister of Health:

(a)    when the construction of the Shang’ombo District Hospital would be completed; and

(b)    when the hospital would be opened to the public.

The Deputy Minister of Health (Dr Chikusu): Mr Speaker, the construction of Shang’ombo District Hospital was awarded to Tomorrow Investments and work commenced on 17th January, 2011. The contractor is, currently, finalising work as per contract and it is expected that works shall be completed within the first quarter of 2012, which is the present quarter.

The House might wish to note that the contract for Shang’ombo District Hospital and Keyana Health Centre was, initially, awarded to Tomorrow Investments and Emsworth and Datong Contractors. This was under a joint venture funded by the Danish International Development Agency (DANIDA) as part of the support to the Ministry of Health. The contract commenced in 2004 but, in 2007, the works stalled due to various factors, one of which was the heavy flooding in the area that caused poor accessibility.

Mr Speaker, the hospital will be opened to the public immediately after completion of works. The Government has made adequate preparations for the opening of the new hospital by filling up the approved establishment of the health workers, and providing adequate allocations of medicines and other medical supplies and equipment, a generator set for electrical power back-up, and transport to ensure that the hospital is fully operational as soon as construction is completed.

The House might wish to further note that the organisational structure and staff establishment for Shang’ombo District Hospital was approved with 193 positions. Sixty-seven out of the193 positions were funded by the Treasury authority of 2011 and the staff have been posted to the district, pending the completion of the hospital. It is also hoped that the Treasury authority for 2012 will fund more positions in addition to the sixty-seven.

I thank you, Mr Speaker.

Mr Mooya (Moomba): Mr Speaker, as far as I remember, the contractor, Tomorrow Investment, was among the forty-two blacklisted companies. May I know whether contractor Tomorrow has …

Laughter

Mr Mooya: I beg your pardon. May I know whether the contractor has, now, been cleared.

The Minister of Health (Dr Kasonde): Mr Speaker, the hon. Member, I am sure, is aware that there are a number of ministries involved in this work. The ministry that is being addressed, now, is not responsible for blacklisting contractors.

Laughter

Dr Kasonde: The hon. Member might wish to draw the attention of the appropriate ministry to deal with this.

I thank you, Sir.

Laugher

Ms Imenda (Luena): Mr Speaker, Happy New Year to you and the rest of the hon. Members in this House.

Hon. Members: Hear, hear!

Ms Imenda: The hon. Minister of Health mentioned that the works at the Shang’ombo Hospital were suspended because of floods in that area. I would, therefore, like to find out from him how long the floods lasted. Did they last four years? Further, if there is going to be another flood, are we going to wait for another four years for works to commence?

Dr Kasonde: Mr Speaker, I think, that is a very important question. However, I would wish to draw attention to the fact that the hon. Minister referred to only one of the factors. The issue of floods was one of the factors. I think that the hon. Deputy Minister was, probably, being polite in avoiding mentioning managerial problems of other administrations. It is, certainly, the intention of our Government to continue with this programme and forestall or deal with any issues arising out of the environment or climate.

I thank you, Sir.

Mr Kampyongo (Shiwang’andu): Mr Speaker, the construction of Shang’ombo Hospital was awarded to Tomorrow Investment some four years ago, but the contract was terminated on the basis of failure of performance. Is the hon. Minister aware of circumstances that led to the ministry re-engaging the contractor?

Hon. Members: Hear, hear!

Dr Kasonde: Mr Speaker, I thank the hon. Member for raising this question. My recollection is that the termination of the contract was not the issue, but the discontinuation because of various factors. I am, therefore, uncertain as regards the relevance of the issue of termination of contract.

I thank you, Sir.

Mr Mwiimbu: Mr Speaker, hon. Cabinet Ministers are collectively accountable to this House. Is the hon. Minister of Health not aware that a statement was made, on the Floor of this House, by the previous Government, that Tomorrow Investment’s contract was terminated due to various factors, including malpractices?

Hon. Opposition Members: Hear, hear!

Dr Kasonde: Mr Speaker, I am grateful to the hon. Member for enlightening me on something that was said by the previous Government. I admit that my knowledge of what was done by the previous Government is rather limited and I would not wish to comment on that.

Laughter

Dr Kasonde: I think that the intention of this Government is to take it up where we found it. Although we have mentioned the difficulties that led to the interruption in the past, it is not my wish to go into the works of another administration.

I thank you, Sir.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Chisanga (Mkushi South): Mr Speaker, our concern is the delay in completing the project. May the hon. Minister state when this project will be completed?

Dr Kasonde: Mr Speaker, I would have invited my colleague, the hon. Deputy Minister, to read, again, the first response he gave on this question.  However, I suppose I am also capable of reading and just, perhaps, as the hon. Member is also capable of doing so. A statement was made on the completion date being the first quarter of 2012. If there are any difficulties in literacy, I am willing to address them.

I thank you, Sir.

Laughter

Mr Muntanga: Mr Speaker, arising from the answers given by the hon. Minister, and knowing the fact that the contract for Tomorrow Investment was entered into by the Ministry of Health, as per earlier arrangement, would it be true to state that what was viewed as corruption in the last Government is not corruption in this Government and vice-versa? Is that correct?

Hon. Government Members: Question!

Dr Kasonde: Mr Speaker, I think that corruption is such an interesting subject. However, it would take us quite a while to relate the date of the corruption to the administration of the corruption. I think that the hon. Member, perhaps, should be raising this as a separate question.

I thank you, Sir.

Mr Antonio (Kaoma Central): Mr Speaker, may the hon. Minister confirm whether he is aware that the contractor is on site, but claims not to have been funded, hence the slow pace at which the works are being carried out.

Dr Kasonde: Mr Speaker, this is enlightenment from the hon. Member and I welcome the information. The information we have is that the contractor is on site and, if that is the case, I will be interested in pursuing this issue with the hon. Member for a visit to see exactly what is happening.

I thank you, Sir.

Mr Namulambe: Mr Speaker, arising from the fact that the completion of the works should be in the first quarter of 2012, which ends next month, but I hear that the contractor is slow because he has not been paid. Is it possible, therefore, that the works will be completed on schedule?

Dr Kasonde: Mr Speaker, as a general observation, it would be rather difficult for the House to operate on the basis of what has been alleged to have happened. At the moment, the statement about non-payment is an allegation that I have agreed to verify. Until that is done, it is my opinion that we should not regard it as a fact.

I thank you, Sir.  {mospagebreak}
 
KEYANA RURAL HEALTH CENTRE

72.    Mr Njeulu asked the Minister of Health when the construction of Keyana Rural Health Centre in Shang’ombo District, which was abandoned in 2007, would resume.

Dr Chikusu: Mr Speaker, the construction of Keyana Rural Health Centre in Shang’ombo District will resume in the second quarter of 2012. This project has been included in the Ministry of Health Infrastructure Operational Plan for 2012. The ministry has completed all the documentation in readiness for the award of a contract.

Mr Speaker, the construction of the health centre has delayed because the Government had prioritised the construction of the Shang’ombo District Hospital before commencing works on Keyana Rural Health Centre.

I thank you, Sir.

SICHILI MISSION HOSPITAL

73.    Mr Sililo (Mulobezi) asked the Minister of Health when a mortuary would be constructed at Sichili Mission Hospital.

Dr Chikusu: Mr Speaker, the Government appreciates the health services that Sichili Mission Hospital provides to the community. As such, it has plans to construct a mortuary at the hospital. Currently, electricity is provided to the hospital by a generator set as there is no connectivity to the Zambia Electricity Supply Corporation (ZESCO) power grid. The generator set is meant to support emergency short-term procedures. It is not sustainable to continuously operate a generator set because of the running costs. The Ministry of Health will construct a mortuary and provide mortuary equipment to Sichili Mission Hospital as soon as the hospital is connected to the ZESCO power grid.

I thank you, Sir.

Mr Kazabu (Nkana): Mr Speaker, are there other district hospitals in the country that do not have a mortuary facility? If so, are there any short, medium and long-term plans to ensure that these hospitals have mortuary facilities?

Mr Speaker: I am very reluctant to call on the hon. Minister, but I will, for obvious reasons.

Laughter

Dr Kasonde: Mr Speaker, I appreciate the question raised by the hon. Member. However, I do not appreciate how he, clearly, links it to the overall strategic plan, which I am quite willing to unfold to the House, but might, perhaps, be a little extraordinary.

I suppose the issue of which hospitals have mortuaries and which ones do not is one that is of interest to all hon. Members of the House. Therefore, we shall answer specific questions on any of them. I further request the hon. Member to be patient so that we deal with the question at hand first, and then deal with the others.

I thank you, Sir.

Professor Lungwangwa: Mr Speaker, from the hon. Minister’s response, the indication is that the construction of a mortuary at Sichili Mission Hospital will be dependent on the connection of that area to the national grid. Could the hon. Minister inform the nation when, exactly, Sichili will be connected for the mortuary to be built? Does he have a rough idea of when the people of Sichili will have a mortuary?

Dr Kasonde: Mr Speaker, the question is whether the answer should come before the question or the question before the answer.

Laughter

Dr Kasonde: I get the impression that we are going in circles. I do not think hon. Members would wish me to address the question of when ZESCO will deal with this matter.

I thank you, Sir.

Laughter

Mr Muntanga: Mr Speaker, knowing the hon. Minister’s eagerness to sort out the problems of Sichili, does he have any other alternative for this hospital, such as getting a generator, specifically to service the hospital?

Dr Kasonde: Mr Speaker, the hon. Member for Kalomo Central has not mentioned the interactions that we have had regarding generators over the last few weeks. I think that it would have been a good preamble because in those discussions, we have established the need and limitations of generators. In this case, the argument that we have put forward is that the generator is there, and the plan to connect power from ZESCO is also there. What need have we of additional cover between now and then?

Mr Speaker, I think we have answered that question.

I thank you, Sir.

Laughter

Mr Mutelo: Mr Speaker, the hon. Minister is answering the question in phases. Could solar power not be an alternative with the new technology at hand?

Dr Kasonde: Mr Speaker, I am willing to discuss the possibility of solar power. I think that the answer we have given does not suggest the need to discuss the use of solar power because the plan is very clear. However, I am willing to speak to the appropriate hon. Minister about the value, place and role of solar power in this situation.

I thank you, Sir.

Mr Miyutu (Kalabo Central): Mr Speaker, according to the hon. Minister of Health, the mortuary is connected to ZESCO power. According to the Oxford Dictionary, …

Mr Speaker: I was just wondering why you had to burden yourself with the load, if I may say overload of a dictionary.

Laughter

Mr Miyutu: … the word mortuary simply means “a building in which dead bodies are kept for hygienic reasons, awaiting burial.”

I would like the hon. Minister to state clearly that the Ministry of Health is not prepared to construct a mortuary at Sichili.

Dr Kasonde: Mr Speaker, I want to thank the hon. Member for Kalabo Central for raising this question. There has been some correspondence that has resulted in some intellectual stimulation. The introduction of the Oxford Dictionary seems to be very appropriate and timely ...

Laughter

Dr Kasonde: ... because I think we, now, have a clear understanding of the relationship between a mortuary and electricity. I think that what we have submitted, by the definition of the Oxford Dictionary, is that there is a mortuary. Therefore, it is a matter of gratitude to the hon. Member to draw our attention to the fact that we have, actually, done what he wanted us to do.

I thank you, Sir.

Laughter

DAMS IN MAMBWE DISTRICT

74. Mr M. B. Mwale (Malambo) asked the Minister of Agriculture and Livestock whether the Government had immediate plans to construct dams in the following wards in Mambwe District in view of the increased livestock population:

(a)    Mphomwa;

(b)    Nyakatokoli; and

(c)    Kasamanda.

The Deputy Minister of Agriculture and Livestock (Brigadier-General Kapaya): Mr Speaker, the Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock has no immediate plans to construct dams in Mphomwa, Nyakatokoli and Kasamanda wards in Mambwe District. The mandate for the construction of large dams lies with the Department of Water Affairs under the Ministry of Lands, Energy and Water Development. However, the Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock constructs small multi-purpose dams that are used for irrigation, fisheries and livestock watering. These irrigation projects are demand-driven by the farmers with clear objectives in terms of what they intend to utilise them for, and with clear market linkages. The ministry, normally, responds to these demands by constructing multi-purpose dams. Farmers in Mphomwa, Nyakatokoli and Kasamanda wards are, therefore, encouraged to approach the nearest agricultural camp extension officers and the District Agricultural Co-ordinator’s (DACO’s) office for technical and extension advise if they need this kind of infrastructure.

I thank you, Sir.

Mr M. B. Mwale: Mr Speaker, is the ministry aware that Malambo is a valley? If it would like to encourage livestock or animal husbandry, dams are a necessity. Therefore, the ministry has to provide the dams to ensure that livestock have water.

The Minister of Agriculture and Livestock (Mr Chenda): Mr Speaker, I would like to encourage the development of livestock, and water is a necessity in this regard. The hon. Member for Malambo should advise members of his community to make a request to the ministry and we will consider it.

I thank you, Sir.

POST OFFICE IN MANYAMA

75. Mr Mwanza (Solwezi West) asked the Minister of Transport, Works, Supply and Communication when the Government would construct a post office in Manyama area in Solwezi West Parliamentary Constituency.

The Deputy Minister of Transport, Works, Supply and Communication (Mr Mwenya): Mr Speaker, the Government would like the postal sector to play a significant role in the aspirations to transform the country into an information-centred society where everyone can create, access, utilise and share information and knowledge. This will lead to greater productivity, competitiveness and sustainable economic growth, which is a pre-condition for poverty reduction. In this regard, the Government has an on-going programme to construct post offices in all districts. The districts currently without post offices include Kazungula, Shang’ombo, Vubwi and Lunga. In 2012, we have planned to construct post offices in Shang’ombo and Vubwi. Unfortunately, in view of the many competing national interests and limited available financial resources, the ministry, currently, does not have plans to construct a post office in Manyama.

Mr Speaker, I thank you.

Mr Mwanza: Mr Speaker, is the hon. Minister aware that most of the mining settlers in Manyama, who voted for the PF Government, have to travel 65 km to Solwezi to access postal services?

The Minister of Transport, Works, Supply and Communication and Chief Whip (Mr Mukanga): Mr Speaker, I think that it is important to note that the PF Government was voted for by the people and that it works for the people. Whenever there is a need to provide a service to the people, it is provided. It is important that the local authorities prioritise the requirement of a post office and it will be constructed.

I thank you, Sir.

Mr Chisala (Chilubi): Mr Speaker, the transportation of mail in the rural parts of this country has been extremely poor for quite a long time now. May I know how the hon. Minister intends to improve on it?

Mr Mukanga: Mr Speaker, although the question is about the construction of a post office in Manyama, I will give the hon. Member a bonus answer. We are trying to revamp the postal service sector so that it meets the aspirations of the people, and come up with a plan to ensure that the services that are provided are adequate and meet the demands of the current generation.

I thank you, Sir.

DISCIPLINARY ACTION AGAINST RECALLED ZAMBIAN DIPLOMATS

76.    Mr Mwanza asked the Minister of Foreign Affairs whether any of the recalled Zambians serving in missions abroad were facing disciplinary action related to misuse of public finances and, if so, how many.

The Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs (Dr Lungu): Mr Speaker, I wish to inform this august House that none of the recalled Zambians formally serving in missions abroad is facing disciplinary action related to misuse of public finances.

I thank you, Sir.

Mr Mwanza: Mr Speaker, I am very curious and would like the hon. Minister to confirm whether Dr Nevers Mumba, the current aspiring candidate for the position of President in the MMD, is being harassed since nobody who has been recalled is facing any disciplinary action.

Dr Lungu: Mr Speaker, it is best to let the investigative wings, in consultation with other stakeholders such as the Auditor-General’s Office, do their work. Only then will I be able to state, exactly, what action will be taken against the former High Commissioner.

I thank you, Sir.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

BENEFITS OF SHIWANG’ANDU POWER PROJECT

77.     Mr Kampyongo asked the Minister of Lands, Energy and Water Development what benefits would accrue to the people of Shiwang’andu Parliamentary Constituency from the ZESCO hydro-power generating project, which was under construction in the area.

Mr C. Zulu: Mr Speaker, I am sure that the hon. Member knows the benefits very well.

Laughter

Mr C. Zulu: Sir, if hydro-electricity is generated in Shiwang’andu, there will be a coffee processing plant in the area, which will translate into more jobs and more money into people’s pockets.

Another benefit is that there will be hammer mills in the area. Currently, there is one which uses diesel but, then, it will be connected to electricity. This will, in turn, create jobs and more money in people’s pockets.

Electricity in the area will also help Shiwang’andu Hospital, which has a capacity for 28 beds and attends to about 8,000 cases per month. The hospital, with four senior staff houses and flats, pumps and treats its own water from the lake using solar and diesel energy. The Lukaka Health Centre, located to the North of Shiwang’andu, is also expected to be supplied with electricity.

Sir, households will also benefit from the electricity to be generated. Although, initially, about 100 households may be electrified, the number will increase with time. Enhanced economic activity in the area will entail high demand and consumption of electricity. More jobs will be created and there will be more money in people’s pockets. Schools will also be electrified and teachers will be attracted to Shiwang’andu. This will raise the education levels in the area.

I thank you, Sir.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Kampyongo: Mr Speaker, I would like to know whether ZESCO will consider coming up with tariffs that will be suitable and acceptable to the people in this area, considering that they are in the low-income bracket.

Mr C. Zulu: Mr Speaker, I think that the question is new and requires that I consult with ZESCO.

I thank you, Sir.

REGISTRATION OF LONDON HIGH COURT JUDGMENT

78.  Mr Mwiimbu (on behalf of Mr Lufuma) (Kabompo West) asked the Minister of Justice whether the Government was considering having the London Judgment involving former President Chiluba and others registered in the High Court of Zambia and, if so, when the registration process would start.

The Deputy Minister of Justice (Dr Simbyakula): Mr Speaker, the Ministry of Justice is in the process of preparing a Cabinet Memorandum on whether or not the registration of the London Judgment should be pursued. Once the Government has made a decision, appropriate action will be taken.

I thank you, Sir.

Mr Mwiimbu: Mr Speaker, I would like the hon. Minister to confirm to me and to the nation that from now onwards, the Cabinet of the Republic of Zambia will have to sit and decide before making any decision pertaining to appeals and registration of judgments, as opposed to leaving it up to the Attorney-General.

The Minister of Justice (Mr S. S. Zulu, SC.): Mr Speaker, you will appreciate that the attempted registration of the London High Court Judgment involving former President Chiluba was done by the previous administration. Therefore, it is necessary for the new administration to look at it. Procedurally, the Government has to make a decision, now, and we have already prepared the Cabinet memorandum to that effect.

Interruptions

Mr S. S. Zulu: It is the intention of the Attorney-General to enforce this judgment, but he wants an input from the Government.

I thank you, Sir.

ZAMBIA INSTITUTE OF ADVANCED LEGAL EDUCATION

79.    Mr Chisala asked the Minister of Justice:

(a)    how many students enrolled at the Zambia Institute of Advanced Legal             Education (ZIALE) from January 2006 to November, 2011;

    (b)    of the students at (a), how many passed the examinations:

        (i)    on the first attempt; and

        (ii)    on subsequent attempts; and

    (c)    how many students did not complete the course, and why.

Dr Simbyakula: Mr Speaker, the number of students who enrolled at ZIALE from January, 2006 to November, 2011 is 766. Sixty-six passed the examinations at first attempt while 204 students passed on subsequent attempts and 121 did not complete the course. This was due to personal reasons, deaths and withdrawals from the course.

I thank you, Sir.

Mr Chisala: Mr Speaker, I thank the hon. Deputy Minister for that answer. However, may I know whether the students who failed stand a chance of readmission to this institution.

Mr S. S. Zulu: Mr Speaker, the rules at ZIALE are that if students fail, they have three chances. If they fail at third attempt, there must be a period of five years before they are allowed to sit again.

I thank you, Sir.

Mr Mwiimbu: Mr Speaker, taking into account that a number of universities that are offering law degrees have sprung up in this country, what measures is the Government putting in place to ensure that the facilities at ZIALE are improved, and that there are other facilities that will cater for all the students who will be coming on board?

Mr S. S. Zulu: Mr Speaker, the ministry intends to put up infrastructure somewhere near Silver Rest, I believe. It will be a big infrastructure with adequate facilities to cater for the large number of students who want to train as lawyers from various universities.

I thank you, Sir.

Mr Mufalali (Senanga): Mr Speaker, following the figures that have been given for this institute, it looks like the pass rate is quite low. Is there a deliberate policy to fail students at this institute, coupled with high fees?

Mr S. S. Zulu: Mr Speaker, there are no policies to deliberately fail students, but there are many factors that have contributed to this large rate of failure. The level of standards at these other universities is the issue. Although students are admitted to these institutions, their standards are not good enough, hence the high failure rate. That is one of the reasons. We are looking into this matter to find out how we can improve the situation.

I thank you, Sir.

Mr Kapeya (Mpika Central): Mr Speaker, my question has already been asked by the hon. Member for Senanga.

COURT MAGISTRATES

80. Mr Chisala asked the hon. Minister of Justice:

(a)    how many districts countrywide had no Subordinate Court Magistrates as of November, 2011;

(b)    how many Senior Resident Magistrates the country had as at the date above; and

(c)    when the recruitment of Magistrates last took place.

Dr Simbyakula: Mr Speaker, there are five districts countrywide that have no Subordinate Courts and these are Chama, Nyimba, Chilubi, Chavuma and Mufumbwe.

Sir, there were five Senior Resident Magistrates by November, 2011. Lastly, the last recruitment of Magistrates was on 21st December, 2011.

I thank you, Sir.

Mr Chisala: Mr Speaker, the answer given by the hon. Minister of Justice in Question 79 revealed that there were many students who successfully completed the Law Degree Course at ZIALE. That being the case, may I know when the hon. Minister intends to send a magistrate to Chilubi.

Mr S. S. Zulu: Mr Speaker, a similar question was put to me in the ministry. I referred the issue to the Hon. Chief Justice and I am still waiting for the answer. I am sure that, if the facilities are available, this matter will be addressed.

I thank you, Sir.{mospagebreak}

BEEF SOLD AT LUSAKA CITY MARKET (SOWETO)

81. Mr Hamusonde (Nangoma) asked the hon. Minister of Local Government, Housing, Early Education and Environmental Protection:

(a)    whether the beef sold at the Lusaka City Market (Soweto) was inspected by the Lusaka City Council (LCC);

(b)    if not, when the inspections would commence to ensure that meat from animals which die of corridor and other diseases is not sold and consumed by unsuspecting members of the public; and

(c)    what measures the council had taken to ensure that the beef traded at the market is free from corridor and other diseases.

The Deputy Minister of Local Government, Housing, Early Education and Environmental Protection (Mrs Banda): Mr Speaker, the Lusaka City Council does not inspect the meat sold at Lusaka City Market because there are no facilities to do so. According to the Public Health, Meat Abattoir and Butcheries Regulations, under the Public Health Act Cap. 295 of the Laws of Zambia, the sale of meat in markets is illegal and a danger to public health and safety.

Sir, the council is in the process of normalising the issue at Lusaka City Market to ensure that no meat is sold in the market.

Mr Speaker, the measure put in place by the LCC to ensure that no beef is sold at the market is that inspectors have been placed at the entrance to the market. Regular inspections will also be made so that no traders are allowed to sell meat in the market in conformity with the provisions of the Public Health Act Cap. 295 of the Laws of Zambia. Further, the Government will develop a strategy on how best the illegal sale of meat can be stopped.

I thank you, Sir.

Mr Hamusonde: Mr Speaker, since the hon. Minister is aware that meat is being sold in the market illegally, may I know how safe we are, eating this meat.

The Minister of Local Government, Housing, Early Education and Environmental Protection (Professor Luo): Mr Speaker, let me take this opportunity, in answering this question, to remind the House that it is always wrong to blame the people that are doing illegal things when we continue to encourage them by transacting with them.

I would like to advise hon. Members of Parliament in this House that they should be inspectors in their constituencies. They should ensure that our people do things legally.

Sir, we are trying our best, as a ministry, to bring back systems, which had broken down completely, so that such activities in markets are stopped. However, no single individual will correct the situation because the systems broke down for the past twenty years.
   
I thank you, Sir.

Mr Nkombo (Mazabuka Central): Mr Speaker, I am very encouraged by the answer given by the hon. Minister to ask her a question about vending, in general, and the selling of meat, in particular. As she rightly put it, we all must help society by being inspectors. Bearing in mind that, at one point, she had introduced some order on the streets by ordering that vending be stopped, afterwards, there was a shift in policy and vendors were free to trade anywhere. Can she help me to reconcile her current thinking with the Government’s stance?

Hon. UPND Members: Hear, hear!

Professor Luo: Mr Speaker, there has been no shift in our Government’s policy regarding vending. What has been there is a misunderstanding of the English Dictionary.

Laughter

Professor Luo: Mr Speaker, when you read a statement that you do not put in context, what is being discussed in the corridors and streets of Lusaka, and the country as a whole, becomes a reality to you. I know what the hon. Member of Parliament is referring to. It is in relation to a letter that was published in The Post Newspaper. I would like to remind this august House that at no time did anybody from the PF allow vending on the streets. The recent debate regarding street vending came about as a result of action that was taken by the Ndola City Council against street vending, which led to a loss of life. It was at this point that the President merely reminded us not to harass street vendors but to, instead, dialogue with them in order to come up with the best way forward.

Interruptions

Professor Luo: Sir, therefore, the position of the Government remains the same. Currently, we have just finished developing a strategy that we are going to use to remove vendors from the streets. In the same vein, I would like to remind this august House, and the nation at large, that the vendors would not be on the streets if we stopped buying from them. The strategy that we have developed also addresses the issue of we, who buy from street vendors, thus encouraging street vending. Anybody who is found buying from a vendor will be charged. In fact, if accepted by the Cabinet, I intend to suggest that people should be put in the cells, even for a night, so that they stop buying from vendors.

I thank you, Mr Speaker.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Namulambe: Mr Speaker, I was following the answers by the hon. Deputy Minister. Arising from the answer to parts (b) and (c), may I know what immediate plans the LCC has to remove people who sell meat in wheelbarrows along the streets near the Lusaka City Market.

Professor Luo: Mr Speaker, the selling of meat in wheelbarrows, around the market, within the market or anywhere else, is illegal. According to the Public Health Act, meat must be sold in a butchery. The council has put in place measures to ensure that anybody selling meat in a wheelbarrow or even on the head is dealt with accordingly.

I thank you, Mr Speaker.

Mr Mwiimbu: Mr Speaker, I would like to thank the hon. Minister for the almost categorical answer she has given on vending and the selling of meat. I want to know what she thinks about the establishment of illegal markets in Lusaka. Is she aware that, along Independence Avenue, near the fly-over bridge, there is a new market called PF Headquarters …

Laughter

Mr Mwiimbu: … where meat and fish are being sold? If she is aware, what measures is she taking to ensure that that market is closed.

Hon. Opposition Members: Hear, hear!

Professor Luo: Mr Speaker, the hon. Member for …

Mr Speaker: Order!
   
Business was suspended from 1615 hours until 1630 hours.

[MR SPEAKER in the Chair]

Professor Luo: Mr Speaker, before business was suspended, Hon. Mwiimbu named a market by the fly-over bridge as the PF Headquarters. From my knowledge, the PF Headquarters is on Luanshya Road in an office that is rented legitimately, unlike our colleagues who sat in a National Pension Scheme Authority (NAPSA) building without paying rent.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Professor Luo: Sir, I am aware of the market he is referring to and we are, currently, making an inventory of all the markets in Lusaka since we are in the process of repossessing stalls from those who have ten stalls each as a result of the cadreisation of the markets and bus stations. All those people are going to be moved into the market. I have, personally, gone there to warn them that they will be moved into the market.

I thank you, Mr Speaker.

Mr Muntanga: Mr Speaker, the hon. Minister has given very good answers and appointed hon. Members of Parliament as special inspectors for meat vending. However, I do not doubt her knowledge …

Laughter

Mr Muntanga: … that meat inspection is a specialised field. Even meat sold along the corridors can be safe for human consumption, but it should be tested properly by qualified inspectors. Now that she has appointed all hon. Members as meat inspectors, may I know what measures she will put in place to ensure that this inspection is done properly. When is she taking us to train as meat inspectors?

Laughter

Professor Luo: Mr Speaker, I do not remember appointing hon. Members of Parliament as inspectors, particularly Hon. Muntanga. I am not trained in the profession to have him sit for interviews in order for me to appoint him. I was simply reminding all hon. Members of Parliament that we should all take responsibility for certain things. The problem that is besieging our country is a big one. It requires a concerted effort because of the past ‘cadreisation’ of the streets, markets, bus stations and land. I think that all of us, as hon. Members and leaders in this country, have the obligation to take responsibility and bring to the attention of the ministry any issues that may require special focus.

Mr Speaker, I thank you.

Mr Kakoma: Mr Speaker, the hon. Minister stated that the President’s letter, which appeared to endorse street vending was meant only for Ndola City Council. I would like to find out who and how this message was twisted to the extent of people thinking that street vending had been legalised across the country. The ‘Don’t Kubeba’ markets are springing up all over the country.

Professor Luo: Mr Speaker, I think that it is not right to put words in somebody’s mouth. I was merely putting that letter in context. Many people have misunderstood it. The phrase “do not harass” does not mean that people should remain on the street. This is why, as a ministry, we have decided to address the issue so that everyone who misunderstood the message, including the vendors, might understand it. 

Mr Speaker, I thank you.

Mr Chisala: Mr Speaker, I would like to learn from the hon. Minister when she intends to reintroduce the position of health inspectors which, at the moment, does not exist in district councils, such as Chilubi.

Professor Luo: Mr Speaker, this is a position that should be in every council. The duties of public health inspectors are enshrined in my ministry’s policy.

What is obtaining, at the moment, is that we have a shortage of manpower. Many of our district councils do not have the required members of staff, not only health inspectors, but also planners and engineers. At the moment, we are making an inventory and collecting all curriculum vitae of members of staff in the councils and advertising all the positions that are vacant so that people can be employed.

Mr Speaker, I thank you.

LUSAKA DRAINAGE SYSTEM

82. Mr Hamusonde asked the Minister of Local Government, Housing, Early Education and Environmental Protection what measures the Lusaka City Council had taken to improve the drainage system, especially on Lumumba and Chachacha roads.

Mrs Banda: Mr Speaker, I wish to inform this august House that the Central Business District (CBD) and part of the light and heavy industrial areas discharge their storm water through the various drainage networks which, eventually, discharge it into either the main Lumumba Road or Cairo Road drains.

Cairo Road Drain

Mr Speaker, the main Cairo Road Drain collects most of the water on the eastern part of Cairo Road and the section of a CBD up to Cha Cha Cha Road. The existing underground Cairo Road Main Drain is a trapezoidal stone-pitched drain measuring, approximately, 3 m deep, 1.5 m wide at the bottom and 2.5 m wide at the top. Due to the increased number of thefts that were reported in the CBD, and the allegation that the Cairo Road Drain was being used as an escape route by thieves, the main drain was, in 2007, completely sealed off with mass concrete cover slabs. This measure helped to prevent thieves from accessing it and, in turn, assisted in the prevention of solid waste from accumulating in the drain. The drain is, currently, adequately functional.

Sir, during heavy downpours in the rainy season, the CBD experiences flush floods along some roads due to the blockage of the existing underground drains. The underground network has, for over fifteen years, not been attended to and, therefore, it is heavily silted in most sections. The areas worst affected are the service alleys between the main roads, where the pipes have been discovered to be completely blocked and require uprooting and replacement.

Rehabilitation of the Cha Cha Cha Road Drain

Mr Speaker, the Cha Cha Cha Road underground drainage network discharges its storm water into the Cairo Road Main Drain. Flush floods are experienced along this road in the rainy season due to siltation of the drain.

Sir, the Lusaka City is in the process of procuring a pressure jet that will be used to flush underground drainage pipes to remove the silt and, eventually, increase their carrying capacity. This will allow for an increased discharge rate of storm water. Shimizu Corporation had, in 2005, assisted the LCC to flush the Katondo Road Underground Drain, which resulted in an increased discharged of storm water.

Lumumba Road (CBD)/Kalambo Road Drain
   
Mr Speaker, the Lumumba Road Drain collects storm water from the western part of the CBD and discharges it, through the Kalambo Road Underground Drain, into the main stream by ZESCO. The capacity of the drain has been grossly affected by the huge amount of waste deposited in the drain by traders along it. With the establishment of Munyaule Market, located next to City Market, …

Laughter

Mrs Banda: … the Lumumba Road Drain has been covered with makeshift structures that have been constructed over it, making it impossible to access it for maintenance.

Lumumba Road (Villa)/Kalambo Road Drain

Mr Speaker, the Lumumba Road Drain also collects storm water from the Mwembeshi Road Junction towards the CBD and discharges it through the Kalambo Road Underground Drain into the main stream. It also collects storm water from the Villa Elizabetha area and discharges it into the Lumumba Road Drain through underground drain pipes along Luanshya Road. These pipes were also flushed open by Shimizu Corporation in 2005. However, due to lack of periodic flushing of the pipes, silt has since accumulated, causing flush floods along Luanshya and its surrounding roads. The procurement of a pressure jet by the council will assist in mitigating the problem.

Measures Already Taken to Improve the Lumumba Road

Mr Speaker, between 2004 and 2007, the council realised that access culverts of the business houses along Lumumba Road had been improperly constructed with some having undersized pipes and others not being at the invert level. This was a bottleneck for the discharge of storm water. The affected business houses were approached and instructed to reconstruct their access by replacing them with box culverts as opposed to culvert pipes. 

The council facilitated the demolition of the said accesses and property owners all constructed their accesses. Equally, the LCC demolished and reconstructed the cross culvert across the Mulalila Road by the Lumumba Road Junction, which was undersized, and replaced it with a 1.8 m X 2.4 box culvert. This, however, has not completely eliminated the drainage problem in the area as the Lumumba drain has rock outcrop, which equally contributes to the stagnation of storm water.

Lumumba/Villa/Matero Drain

The Lumumba/Mwembeshi Road Junction and Chandwe Musonda Road Junction, towards Matero, discharge their storm water through Emmasdale into the mainstream that crosses the Great North Road, eventually connecting into the Ngwerere Stream. The major problem with this section of the drain is the undersized roadside drain, which gets overwhelmed when it rains and cannot adequately discharge the storm water, thus causing flush floods. It is, therefore, proposed that the entire Lumumba Road  …

Interruptions

Mr Speaker: Order, order!

Let the response be made to the House. You will follow it up with questions.

Mrs Banda: … roadside drain be completely reconstructed and replaced with a larger one to improve the discharge capacity. With the reconstruction of the Lumumba Road drain, the culvert across the Great North Road at the Mandevu/Lumumba Road Junction will, equally, have to be replaced with a larger drain. This will also solve the floods problem perennially experienced at the Mandevu Junction.

Proposed Rehabilitation Strategy

Lumumba Road has deteriorated with potholes and cracks in a number of sections along the carriageway. It is currently due for rehabilitation and has been identified as a priority road for rehabilitation in Lusaka City because it is a by-pass route for long distance vehicles and buses, and a major road in the CBD. It is proposed that, with the reconstruction of the road, the drain will also be reconstructed.

Maintenance of the Major Outflow Drains

The LCC is currently dredging the major outflow drains in the city and Ngwerere Stream, which is a backbone drain for the city, and was the first to be worked on. The Emmasdale/LumumbaRoad/Great North Road Drain has also been worked on. It is hoped that, with the dredging of these drains, there will be an increased discharge of storm water from the city.

I thank you, Mr Speaker.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Namulambe: Mr Speaker, from that long answer given by the hon. Minister, I have heard that the drain along Lumumba Road is going to be reconstructed. However, when you walk through there, you find that the drainage is full of solid waste and even the island is becoming the new dump site like the Chunga one. There is a lot of dirt. Is the Government going to wait for the reconstruction of the drain when garbage is being dumped there, day by day, and the area is looking very filthy before it clears the solid waste?

Professor Luo: Mr Speaker, the hon. Deputy Minister referred to the fact that apart from the poor construction, we also have the problem of waste that clogs the drainage system. Therefore, apart from reconstruction, it is important that the waste is also removed so that we unblock the blockages.

Sir, one of our biggest challenges, as a ministry, is waste management in the country. This is a problem we inherited, but one we are facing head on. We are in discussions with a number of stakeholders who are thinking outside the box so that we put in place a waste management system that will stand the test of time.

I thank you, Mr Speaker.

Hon. Government Member: Hear, hear!

Mr Muntanga: Mr Speaker, the answer by the hon. Minister has been so comprehensively given and it is a very good one. However, may I know, tentatively, when we are going to change by, especially, enlarging the drains that come near Mandevu. As you go towards Ngwerere, the drains become smaller and this is also causing the clogging because, during a storm, if the outlet is small, there is going to be a blockage. When are we going to make bigger drainage systems?

Professor Luo: Mr Speaker, I am sure the hon. Member of Parliament for Kalomo Central knows that renovations and reconstruction are more difficult than doing works for the first time. This is why the PF Government is very conscious of fighting corruption. When you give contracts from which you want to get kickbacks, the people that you give them to will not do a good job.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Professor Luo: What we are talking about is the result of this.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Professor Luo: My ministry, in partnership with our sister ministry, which is responsible for drains and roads, the Ministry of Transport Works, Supply and Communication, will do a good job and ensure that the contracts are given to people who are responsible and able to come back, if they have not done a good job, to correct the works without any further payment by the State.

I thank you, Sir.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Dr Chituwo (Mumbwa): Mr Speaker, I am also grateful for that elaborate answer in which the hon. Minister mentioned that one of the major causes of these flush floods and blockages of drains are various forms of solid waste, for example, Chibuku containers and plastic items. Therefore, my question is: Is the hon. Minister considering, at some point, the banning of production of sachets and the use of plastic containers, which are not bio-degradable?

Professor Luo: Mr Speaker, I just want to inform my uncle that his question has been overtaken by events. It is a pity he did not do it because I am going to do it.

I thank you, Mr Speaker.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Professor Lungwangwa: Mr Speaker, according to research on street children conducted in 1991, 1996 and 2005 or thereabout, it is evident that the drainage systems in our urban areas are havens for our street children and, clearly, the clogging of drainages that has been referred to is as a result of the activities of the street children. May I know from the hon. Minister how she hopes to reconcile the efforts of dredging the drainage systems while, at the same time, these systems continue to be accommodation or habitation for our street children? How are the two to be reconciled?

Professor Luo: Mr Speaker, the responsibility that I was given by the President of the Republic of Zambia is that of looking after local councils, housing, early education and environmental protection. The hon. Member might wish to ask that question to the hon. Minister of Youth and Sport as well as the hon. Minister of Community Development, Mother and Child Health.

I thank you, Mr Speaker.

Mr Kampyongo: Mr Speaker, may I know from the hon. Minister if she is aware that most of these drainages are, actually, in their current state as a result of the manner in which contracts to construct them were given.

Interruptions

Mr Kampyongo: The contracts were being given in such a way that there was no proper liability period that obligated the contractors to make sure that the drainages were maintained for a certain period of time. If the hon. Minister is aware of that fact, what is she doing about it?

Professor Luo: Mr Speaker, in fact, I did refer to that. As for what we are doing about it, as you know, the contracts were not awarded by the PF Government, but we cannot cry over spilt milk. The challenge that the people of Zambia have given us is to correct the situation. We are moving on and I think we should not go backwards.

I thank you, Mr Speaker.

Interruptions {mospagebreak}

REDESIGNING OF SOLWEZI TOWN

83. Ms Sayifwanda asked the Minister of Local Government, Housing, Early Education and Environmental Protection whether the Government had plans to redesign Solwezi Town and, if so, when the project would commence.

Mrs Banda: Mr Speaker, I wish to inform this august House that the Government is, currently, in the process of redesigning Solwezi Town through the preparation of an Integrated Development Plan (IDP). Structural plans, otherwise known as IDPs, effectively guide the growth and development of towns and cities. They provide a physical framework for socio-economic development and for land use, such as residential, commercial, agricultural, recreational, industrial, social and economic infrastructure provision.

The preparation of the Solwezi IDP is in line with the provisions of the Town and Country Planning Act, Cap 283 of the Laws of Zambia. Furthermore, the said Act requires that a development plan for an area be reviewed every five years for it to be responsive to existing developmental challenges. The existing 1964 Solwezi Development Plan, which took a master plan approach, is outdated and has to be reviewed accordingly.

Currently, the three major phases of the Solwezi IDP have been concluded, namely the Status Quo Report, Spatial Development Framework Report and Capital Investment Programme. The Status Quo Report provides the current status regarding the physical, social, economic and institutional environment in Solwezi. The Spatial Development Framework provides the development vision and principles, strategies for delivery, and development concepts. The Capital Investment Programme provides the detailed cost for implementing and providing the proposed infrastructure. What is remaining to be done is conclusion of consultations with the various local stakeholders, including traditional authorities. In particular, consultations are being concluded with traditional authorities to extend the current Solwezi planning boundary to accommodate the current and projected needs of the population.

Sir, I thank you.

Mr Namulambe: Mr Speaker, may I know how competent Solwezi Municipal Council and the North-Western Province Planning authorities are to undertake such works.

Professor Luo: Mr Speaker, I think I made reference to the fact that our local councils are not as well equipped, in terms of human resource, as we would love them to be. What any ministry that is serious does when faced with difficulties of staff numbers and capacities is to hire consultants.

I thank you, Mr Speaker.

Mr Mulusa (Solwezi Central): Mr Speaker, I thank the hon. Minister for that elaborate answer and the promise that, indeed, there is a plan being considered for redesigning Solwezi. However, I would like to find out from the hon. Minister whether, instead of waiting for the entire redesigning of Solwezi, there cannot be any consideration of the immediate provision of some interventions so that lives can be saved. I am referring to the narrow road running inside the town where people are being knocked down every single day.

Professor Luo: Mr Speaker, I think that we are talking about two different things. When we are talking about the IDPs, that is a totally different issue from trying to widen the current roads so that we prevent accidents. Nonetheless, that is something that we, as a ministry, can consider and it is not only with reference to Solwezi, but also everywhere else in the country. Again, this goes back to the way contracts were being given, who monitored the works, whether they followed the plan and other issues. So, I can assure the hon. Member that we will consider that.

Sir, I thank you.

Mr Kakoma: Mr Speaker, while the ministry is still considering this IDP and trying to bring together all the three phases that the hon. Minister referred to, other developers are busy carrying out development works in Solwezi. Thousands of houses are being planned and constructed. May I know whether these new developments that are currently taking place outside the framework of the IDP, which may be implemented ten years from now, are being taken into account..

Professor Luo: Mr Speaker, if one reads the Local Government Act, one will discover that there is only one ministry that has been given the responsibility to approve development plans. What has happened in Zambia, in the past few years, where everybody develops or sells land without authority from the council, is not correct. I just want to take advantage of this chance to sound a warning that this must stop forthwith.  We will pull down any developments that have not been approved by the councils. In fact, we have started doing that. Recently, when I was on the Copperbelt, I pulled down the buildings of those who gave themselves plots even on reserved land and started building. Let me take advantage of this opportunity to remind the Zambians that the PF is a Government of laws. We will not allow people to do whatever they like. That is history as it stopped on 23rd September, 2011.

I thank you, Mr Speaker.

Hon. PF Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Muntanga: Mr Speaker, how will the energetic hon. Minister, …

Laughter

Mr Muntanga: … address the problem of people being hit by vehicles in Solwezi? There are speed humps on the road, cars move slowly and people walk on the streets. What measures are going to be taken to ensure that there are few people crossing the road?

Professor Luo: Mr Speaker, in fact, as the hon. Member was talking, I was wondering whether he can help me to go and advise his cousins to stop doing that on the streets. He is best placed to help me so that his cousins in Solwezi walk like everybody else in the Southern Province walks.

Laughter

Professor Luo: Mr Speaker, I just want to amplify the fact that our ministry will not entertain any illegal activities, including walking on the streets carelessly. I would like, once again, to inform this august House that this is the responsibility of all of us, here, because we are all leaders and it is very difficult for Professor Luo from Lusaka to go and see what is happening in Solwezi.

I thank you, Sir.

Mr Taima: Mr Speaker, I know that the easiest way out of my question …

Mr Mwaliteta: On a point of order, Sir.

Mr Speaker: A point of order is raised.

Mr Mwaliteta: Mr Speaker, is the hon. Member of Parliament for Kalabo Central in order to wear a jacket that has patches all over like he is going hunting? The jacket he is wearing is unparliamentary. I need your serious ruling, Sir.

Mr Speaker: Sorry, I have not seen what you are seeing.

Interruptions

Mr Mwaliteta: Sorry, it is the hon. Member for Senanga Central.

Mr Speaker: Anyway, that point of order is not sustained due to mistaken identity.

Laughter

Mr Speaker: The hon. Member for Solwezi East may continue, please.

Mr Taima: Mr Speaker, I was just about to solicit a very objective answer from the hon. Minister on the so-called redesigning of Solwezi. You can call it IDP or whatever, but it has been there for quite some time. I know the easiest way out might be to apportion blame, but I solicit a very objective response.

I am aware that this process has been going on, hon. Minister, for the past five years or so because a committee thereon was constituted by the late President Mwanawasa in 2007. We have heard so much about redesigning this and that and, to date, we still hear about redesigning. My question, hon. Minister, is: From the time that you took over office, could you have learnt of what the major bottlenecks in this process that have caused us to still be talking about redesigning Solwezi, to date, could have been? If you have learnt about the bottlenecks, are you able to give us a specific time when we expect this plan to be completed so that we begin to redesign the town?

Professor Luo: Mr Speaker, in answering this question, I would have really loved the hon. Member to be the one to tell me why his Government failed to implement this.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Professor Luo: Instead of coming to this august House to look intelligent, he should tell me why he failed. However, let me assure him that I am not interested in apportioning blame if …

Mr Nkombo: On a point or order, Sir.

Mr Speaker: A point of order is raised.

Mr Nkombo: Mr Speaker, I apologise for standing on a point of order on a very experienced Parliamentarian, Hon. Professor Luo, who knows very well that the rules of this House are that in answering questions posed to you, you should not refer to former occupations of hon. Members of Parliament. Is she, therefore, in order to continue on that path when the hon. Member who asked a question innocently wanted to know what this Government is doing?

Interruptions

Mr Nkombo: Mr Speaker, I need your protection. I wish to know whether or not she is in order to continue …

Mr Lubinda interjected.

Mr Muntanga: Hon. Lubinda.

Mr Nkombo: … on that path of referring to the past engagement of Hon. Richard Taima when she herself was once in the Government?

Laughter

Mr Speaker: Order!

Honestly, I think that the hon. Minister of Local Government, Housing, Early Education and Environmental Protection was actually thinking aloud and wondering why the ills that are complained of had not been corrected in the past. However, she did continue to try and give an explanation in response to the question. Therefore, I think I will give her the liberty to continue explaining.

The hon. Minister may continue.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Laughter

Professor Luo: Mr Speaker, I thank you for the wise counsel. I just wanted to assure the hon. Member of Parliament that my ministry has all the reports on the table and we shall give a timeframe for implementing the development of Solwezi. We are being careful so that the plans are appropriate and well-funded to avoid doing a shoddy job.

I thank you, Sir.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

____________________

MOTION

ADJOURNMENT

    The Vice-President (Dr Scott): Mr Speaker, I beg to move that the House do now
adjourn.

Question put and agreed to.

__________

The House adjourned at 1714 hours until 1430 hours on Wednesday, 22nd February, 2012.




 
< Prev   Next >
evden eve nakliyat
 
Committees
Composition
Time table of sittings
Committee Reports
Sessional Committees
Functions of Committees
Attendance Guidelines
Time-Table Long Sitting
Local Governance
Committee on Estimates
PAC Meeting Time-Table 2014
Publications
Debates & Proceedings
Bills Before Parliament
Order paper
Acts of Parliament
Abstracts on Procedure
IPU News
IPU E-Bullettin
Library e-Resources
Points of Order and Rulings
Ministerial Statements
e-Newsletter
Bills Reports
Library Databases
Standing Orders
Handbooks
Parliamentary Reforms
About the Reforms
Reforms
Events Calendar
December 2014
S M T W T F S
301 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31 1 2 3
Home | Contact Us | Parliament Radio | Mail      
bottom
© 2014 National Assembly of Zambia
Joomla! is Free Software released under the GNU/GPL License.
 

 

izmir evden eve taşımacılık üçyol evden eve bornova evden eve buca evden eve inşaat firmaları izmir asansörlü nakliyat izmir evden eve taşımacılık oyun oyna izmir escort izmir escort
webtasarım, hosting
ankara escort eryaman escort
kocaeli escort
/