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line Home arrow Debates & Proceedings arrow Fifth Session of the Tenth Assembly arrow Debates- Friday, 26th November, 2010 Thursday, 30 October 2014  
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Debates- Friday, 26th November, 2010 PDF Print E-mail
Tuesday, 14 December 2010
DAILY PARLIAMENTARY DEBATES FOR THE FIFTH SESSION OF THE TENTH ASSEMBLY

Friday, 26th November, 2010

The House met at 0900 hours

[MR SPEAKER in the Chair]

NATIONAL ANTHEM

PRAYER

________

HIS HONOUR THE VICE-PRESIDENT’S QUESTION TIME

Mr D. Mwila (Chipili): Mr Speaker, may I find out from His Honour the Vice-President when the 2010 Constituency Development Fund (CDF) will be released.

Hon. Opposition Members: Hear, hear!

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice (Mr Kunda, SC.): Mr Speaker, what I know is that the money is available at the Ministry of Local Government and Housing. Those councils which have submitted returns and have accounted for the last CDF will have the money released to them. There might be a slight shortfall on it, of about K20 billion, but we are trying to make sure that all the money is made available. A substantial part of the CDF is already at the ministry and is being distributed to all the councils that have accounted for the last CDF.

I thank you, Mr Speaker.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Mukanga (Kantanshi): Mr Speaker, I would like to find out what measures the Government has put in place to monitor that the fuel that is sold at various filling stations is not adulterated in order to protect automobiles from premature engine failure?

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice: Mr Speaker, the Energy Regulation Board (ERB) does conduct inspections of filling stations to ensure that the fuel which is sold is up to standard.

However, I wish to advise the hon. Member not to buy fuel from unlicensed vendors. If they do that, I think that they are bound to buy fuel which is adulterated. As regards to the fuel from filling stations, it is regularly inspected in accordance with our regulations. Therefore, we are doing everything possible to ensure that the fuel which is sold to motorists is up to standard so that we can protect their motor vehicles and even the environment.

I thank you, Sir.

Ms Kapata (Mandevu): Mr Speaker, a team was tasked under the Ministry of Sport, Youth and Child Development to look at the issue of indiscriminate drinking. Is the Government considering limiting the quantity of alcohol that is being sold so that we can get rid of the sachet alcohol popularly known as tujilijili?

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice: Mr Speaker, what I know is the council is looking into that matter according to our regulations. All the issues which were being considered include the volume and percentage of alcohol in those sachets which you are talking about. Of course, we should be concerned if our people are turning into drunkards because we want our people to work hard. If anything, that matter has already been considered seriously.

I thank you, Mr Speaker.

Mr Lumba (Solwezi Central): Mr Speaker, in view of the fact that the Government is encouraging private-public partnership (PPP) in the energy sector, will it consider disbanding the Zambia Electricity Supply Corporation (ZESCO) into generation transmission distribution?

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice: Mr Speaker, for now, there are no such plans. Of course, we are all interested in an efficient ZESCO, that is why from time to time, we will continue to look into issues of efficiency.

I thank you, Sir.

Mr Simuusa (Nchanga): Mr Speaker, I would like to find out from the Vice-President what plans this Government has for the Voters’ Registration Exercise after it ends on the 30th of November.

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice: Mr Speaker, we have continuous registration of voters and that is what we follow by law. However, depending on resources, the Electoral Commission of Zambia (ECZ) which is an independent body has suggested a cut off date, but that is subject to review depending on how many voters that have been captured. Therefore, we will see how far we have gone by the end of this month. The ECZ, as an independent institution, will look into the possibility of extension, but I cannot say that for the ECZ it will also depend on availability of resources.

I thank you, Mr Speaker.

Mr Kambwili (Roan): Mr Speaker, last week the Vice-President announced that the Constitution will be brought to Parliament for enactment and that the elections will be held minus the 50 plus 1 per cent clause. May I know whether there were consultations with all stakeholders before the Vice-President made that announcement?

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice: Mr Speaker, we had made a law in this House when we were creating the National Constitutional Conference (NCC) and the hon. Member supported the enactment of that Act which we passed …

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice: … as a law. That particular Act required the NCC to decide whether to take certain portions to a referendum or to effect amendments. In line with that law, a decision was made by the NCC to refer certain portions including the 50 plus 1 clause to a referendum. The NCC was a widely representative body …

Mr Kambwili: Question!

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice: … whose creation was supported …

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice: … by most of the major political parties including the PF.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice: I recall when we made that decision at Mulungshi, the President of PF was there and he was even congratulating the late President for having introduced such an ingenuous idea of the NCC.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice: There are even photographs in the archives where a certain …

Hon. PF Members: Question!

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice : … politician who is a leader of PF …

Laughter

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice : … was congratulating the late President. Mr Chifumu Banda, SC. was there and other leaders of political parties.

Mr Nkhata: Na Guy Scott!

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice (Mr Kunda): We embraced and shook hands and we were all smiling.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice : We put the NCC into motion.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear.

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice : Now, the work of the NCC is over and we have spent money. Presidents of political parties also supported that idea.

 According to what we decided, a decision regarding the 50 plus 1 clause will be made by the people of Zambia in a referendum when we decide to go for it, resources permitting.

I thank you.

Hon. Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Lubinda (Kabwata): Mr Speaker, member states of the United Nations in July of this year paired countries for the purpose of peer reviewing each other on the implementation of the United Nations Convention Against Corruption (UNCAC). At that function, Zimbabwe and Italy were paired to peer review Zambia. Whereas many other countries have put in place all the necessities for the peer review process, Zambia to date has not submitted any such related documents to the secretariat of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC). I would like to find out from His Honour the Vice President and Learned Minister of Justice what progress this Government is making for it to be in line with the provisions of the UNCAC which this Government ratified in January 2009.

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice: Mr Speaker, we support and are committed to the implementation of the UNCAC that is why we brought here as part of our reforms a modern statute on the fight against corruption. We introduced the new Anti-corruption Act and in that legislation, we have domesticated some of the provisions of that UN convention.

As to the matter you have raised which is related to us showing our commitment to the domestication of the convention, I will look into it and ensure that we do what is required. I thank you for bringing it to my attention.

I thank you.

Mr Milupi (Luena):  Mr Speaker, as a result of rampant cattle thefts in the Western Province, the life style of those who keep cattle has changed because people are subjected to sleep in the kraals instead of their houses. What is this Government doing to restore law and order so that those who own cattle in the Western Province can also enjoy peaceful sleep?

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice: Mr Speaker, what I know is that cattle rustling is a very serious offence and there is need for us to protect cattle in areas where we have a lot like in the Western, Southern, Eastern, North-Western provinces and many other parts of the country. We have a cattle rustling squad in the Police Service. We need to beef up on its work by increasing its operations. However, we all must work together so that we can be more effective in law enforcement.

I thank you, Sir.

Mr Kapeya (Mpika Central): Mr Speaker, I would like His Honour the Vice President to give a fair comment without fear or favour on the announcement made by a president of one of the Opposition political parties that in 2001, the late Mr Anderson Mazoka won the elections and in 2006 and 2008 Mr Michael Sata won the elections, but that due to a defective electoral system, the MMD claimed victory in all instances.

Interruptions

Mr Speaker: Order!

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice: Mr Speaker, that politician you have mentioned failed to realise his ambitions. The people of Zambia rejected him overwhelmingly. He took the matter to court and withdrew the petition later. Regarding the 2001 electoral petition, I was then Attorney-General and I appeared in that courts. The evidence which was adduced did not suggest what you are saying and so the court upheld the election results. Elections in this country, especially in the 2008 one, were adjudged to be free and fair even by the European Union and many other observers such that they showered accolades on Zambia for being a democratic State. It is not true that our electoral process has the problems that you have suggested. The same party you are talking about has been winning elections. When they win elections, the Electoral Commission of Zambia (ECZ) has done a good job, but when they lose, they claim rigging. Please, let us be fair.

I thank you, Sir.

Hon. Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Chimbaka (Bahati): Mr Speaker, preservation of law and order is a preserve of the Government in power. May I know what the Government is contemplating on doing to politicians who want to hide in politics to fan anarchy in Zambia such that they end up only being tear gassed and scampering all over.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice: Mr Speaker, we should discourage lawlessness…

Hon. Members: Hear, hear!

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice:… especially by those who aspire to be presidents of this country.

Hon. Members: Hear, hear!

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice: Mr Speaker, yesterday there was an incident where a certain politician was called by the Drug Enforcement Commission and he went with a bus load of cadres to attend that particular interview.

Interruptions

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice: The cadres became unruly and the investigations which we have conducted suggest that some of these thugs even had tear gas canisters. Where they got the teargas canisters, we do not know. One of them even had a gun and this is unfortunate.  We should not fan anarchy in this country.

Interruptions

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice: TheN all the Zambia security agencies will rise to the occasion and maintain law and order in this country. All political parties should embrace peace. They should be in the forefront teaching their cadres peaceful ways of going about their lives. We shall do everything possible to maintain law and order. No one is above the law and the law will take its course on all law breakers.

I thank you, Sir.

Hon. Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Mwiimbu (Monze Central): Mr Speaker, I would like to find out from His Honour the Vice- President on what the Government is going to do pertaining to the programme of work that was done and circulated by the Ministry of Education …

Interruptions

Mr Mwiimbu: … with regard to the construction of schools and teachers’ houses in various constituencies.

Interruptions

Mr Mwiimbu: Mr Speaker, it has transpired that the programme which is intended to uplift the education standards of the people …

Interruptions

Mr Speaker: Order! Please behave! What he is saying is extremely important because it is part of your oversight assignment. Do not disturb others.

Will the hon. Member continue, please?

Mr Mwiimbu: Mr Speaker, I was trying to refer to the fact that the good programme that was brought out and circulated by the hon. Minister of Education pertaining to the construction of primary and basic schools and teachers’ houses in various constituencies in the Republic of Zambia has not been funded to date. What is going to happen to that good programme which is intended to uplift the education standards of people in the country?

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice: Mr Speaker, that is a very important question and I know our people need information on the construction of schools. We, as a Government, shall continue with the good work of constructing schools throughout the country. However, as you know, the procedure requires that we tender for all these works. The money is available and, so, those projects will be funded. At the moment, they are just at tender stages in some places but, despite the delay, I can confirm that funding will be available for the projects.

I thank you, Sir.

Mrs Sinyangwe (Matero): Mr Speaker, I would like to find out from the Vice-President whether there are any plans to increase the number of training schools for the police to curb crime and the hooliganism that is continuing to rise in this country.

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice: Mr Speaker, I thank the hon. Member for that observation. In order for us, as a Government, to maintain law and order, we should increase the strength of the Zambia Police Force and continue to train police officers so that, as the hon. Member has rightly pointed out, we can curb hooliganism in the political arena and those who want to fan anarchy so that they can be properly policed by our security agencies. So, we shall continue to increase on the numbers by training more people so that we can have peace in this country.

I thank you, Sir.

Mr V. Mwale (Chipangali): Mr Speaker, I would like to find out from His Honour the Vice-President what the Government’s position is on formation of political alliances in this country and what the legality of such alliances is.

Hon. Opposition Members: Aah!

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice: Mr Speaker, thank you for that very important question.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice: I want to give some tips on forming alliances ...

Laughter

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice: … among political parties. Of course, political parties are free to form some of these alliances provided they have a common vision and, perhaps, the same ideologies and manifestos. However, if an alliance is to be formed, for example, between a communist party and capitalist party, chances are that such an alliance may not last.

Laughter

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice: You should also look at the personalities of the people you are dealing with …

Laughter

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice: … and their past records.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice: Mr Speaker, if you make enquiries, you will know whether it is worthwhile to go into such an alliance. Also, we have seen that as regards support, especially from newspapers, one of the political parties in an alliance is covered while the other party is crying …

Laughter

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice: … because of lack of coverage. Now, that will put you …

Laughter

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice: Mr Speaker, we must be careful how we enter into some of these alliances.

 Some of the political parties are advocating the construction of under-five clinics …

Laughter

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice: … in these alliances.

I thank you, Sir.

Dr Scott (Lusaka Central): Mr Speaker, it is reported, in the Times of Zambia of this morning, that Konkola Copper Mine (KCM) has been fined K21.9 million for polluting the Kafue River. This is the price of half of one tonne of copper. How are we supposed to take seriously the alleged policies of this Government in relation to environmental protection and care for the many people, who are dependent upon the Kafue for their water with such a joke of a fine?

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice: Mr Speaker, that case which the hon. Member is talking about was taken to the courts which reached a fair judgement. We are the people who make laws and they are supposed to be enforced and interpreted by the courts. Therefore, that particular case was concluded in that particular manner. We should accept decisions of the courts as good citizens.

I thank you, Sir.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Colonel Chanda (Kanyama): Mr Speaker, I would like to find out from His Honour the Vice-President whether he is aware that Kanyama Constituency, in particular, and Lusaka in general has been invaded by an influx of refugees from Rwanda. If so, what steps are being taken to ensure that this country is not invaded by refugees who have a genocidal tag?

Hon. Opposition Member: Hear, hear!

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice: Mr Speaker, as good citizens and hon. Members of Parliament, we should make reports on matters of security. However, some of the issues you have raised, of course, have some diplomatic implications. You may not know, but these are the cases which we deal with in our offices on a daily basis, according to the laws of this country. That particular matter will be looked into. However, if you have more information, give it to us, through the security agencies, and we shall look into it.

I thank you, Sir.

Mr Imenda (Lukulu East): Mr Speaker, I would like to find out whether His Honour the Vice-President is aware that the workers of former Spirit of the River of the Western Province, who were involved in mining of diamonds, still have their salaries, rentals and car hire charges unpaid. Therefore, I would like to find out how the Government is going to help those people who have been suffering since the departure of the Spirit of the River.

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice: Mr Speaker, the Spirit of the River was a private company. We, as a Government, are aware of the position the hon. Member has made reference to because there have been some claims by workers for unpaid dues. However, pursuing the terminal benefits can only be done, in accordance with the laws of this country, by tracing the owners of that company and pursuing them for this cause. The Ministry of Labour and Social Security, through the relevant department, can assist those workers in pursuing their dues.

I thank you, Sir.

Captain Moono (Chilanga): Mr Speaker, I would like the Vice-President to clarify the position of the University of Zambia Student’s Union (UNZASU) President, who recently accompanied His Excellency the President of this Republic to Brazil and, today, it is reported that the University of Zambia (UNZA) students are trying to impeach him. May he clarify the circumstances under which the UNZASU President found himself on this trip?

Hon. Opposition Members: Hear, hear!

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice: Mr Speaker, if the UNZASU President travelled with the President, he was included in the entourage like any other Zambian citizen. As regards the issue of other UNZASU members trying to impeach him, I have no knowledge of that matter. Therefore, the hon. Member can give us more information on that matter as it relates to the constitution of UNZASU, which I read a long time ago and, therefore, cannot remember its contents.

I thank you, Mr Speaker.

Mr Mwango (Kanchibiya): Mr Speaker, I just want to make a follow up on the question that was asked by Hon. Mukanga. I would like to know what the Government is doing to check the industrial kerosene volumes bought by various filling stations against that which they sell because there is always a variance. You find that they buy 1000 litres, but sell 400 litres. So, where is the 600 litres going?

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice: Mr Speaker, I think I comprehensively answered that question when I said that inspections are done by ERB. That is how far I can go, but if the hon. Member has a specific case in mind, he can refer it to the ERB for appropriate action.

I thank you, Mr Speaker.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

___________

QUESTIONS FOR ORAL ANSWER

LONDON COURT CASE

182. Mr Lumba (Solwezi Central) asked the Vice-President and Minister of Justice:

(a) how much money the Government had spent on the London Court case involving the Second Republican President in legal fees and travel costs for the Attorney-0General and support staff; and

(b) what the benefit of the case had been to the country.

Interruptions

Mr Speaker: Order! Order!

The Deputy Minister of Justice (Mr Chilembo): Mr Speaker, according to available records, the Government, in the London Court case, incurred the following:

Legal fees Expense incurred

 Foreign legal fees US$11,160,761.27

Local legal fees  K1,202,204,000 (US$2,360,613.33)

Travel costs for the Attorney-General K305,159,728.50
and support staff

Mr Speaker, the break down of the travel costs is as follows:


Use Cost
 (K)

Travel expenses for Attorney-General 24,827,612.50

Travel costs for support from the Ministry of Justice 68,969,240

Travel costs for officers from the Task Force 211,362,876

Grand total 305,159,728.50

Most of the travels were undertaken by the Task Force staff and a State advocate. The costs incurred by the Task Force were met by donor funds. In addition, the Attorney-General appointed lawyers in London who did the day-to-day work.

The benefit to the country is that the judgment allows for execution on any properties or assets belonging to any of the defendants abroad. Some assets have since been recovered.

Mr Speaker, I thank you.

Mr Lumba: Sir, I want to find out what kind of cost benefit analysis is done by the Legal Department for it to take up a case such as the one in the London Court.

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice (Mr Kunda, SC.): Mr Speaker, it depends on the instructions that a lawyer receives and Hon. Mwiimbu will understand my use of the word ‘instructions’. This term is used in a technical sense. In the legal fraternity, an instruction is not like an order in the military. The client gives the facts and, in this case, the Task Force on corruption gave us facts on some assets outside the country and money in foreign accounts. Since there were prospects of success, we took up the case.

Therefore, an instruction is the authority on which a case is taken up. Lawyers look at issues of how much money or property is at stake. In this particular case, upon receiving instructions, we believed that assets were available and some of the assets have, indeed, been recovered from that particular court action.

I thank you, Mr Speaker.

Mr Milupi (Luena): Mr Speaker, in his answer to part (b) of the question, which related to the benefits of this country, the hon. Deputy Minister stated that this country, as a result of the court action, recovered some properties. Would His Honour the Vice-President, therefore, inform us whether the non-registration of that case here in Zambia and the refusal of this Government to appeal, is going to have an adverse impact on the continued recoveries of the properties which this Government won on behalf of this country.

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice: Mr Speaker, that particular judgment is valid and enforceable outside the borders of this country. It can be enforced in the United Kingdom (UK). If the hon. Member has any information of assets lying somewhere in Europe, he should let us know so that we recover those assets.

As regards the enforcement of that judgment in Zambia, we are a sovereign State and the courts of this country guided us that this particular judgment could not be registered in here and we must accept the decisions of the courts. Now, that situation is not only unique to Zambia. We have taken court proceedings to the UK and the British system has refused to have these proceedings registered there. An example is extradition which our counterparts say does not comply with their laws. They might even be holding a prime suspect, but would refuse to release that person because of the laws of their country.

So, we have our own Judiciary which guides us on the interpretation of laws and what it has said is that this particular judgment, according to our laws, cannot be registered. We put up arguments before the court, but it rejected the arguments for the registration of that judgment. Therefore, we must accept decisions which are made by the courts.

I thank you, Mr Speaker.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Mukanga (Kantanshi): Mr Speaker, having used up those levels of taxpayers’ money, does His Honour the Vice-President think it was prudent not to appeal when the taxpayers had already paid for that court case?

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice: The hon. Member is concerned about the wasting of taxpayers’ money and I commend him for that. However, if we are to pursue futile cases, knowing very well that we were going to lose because the Attorney-General guided us that it would be a futile exercise to lodge a frivolous and vexatious appeal, it would not be of any benefit to the nation. As a Government, we cannot do that because we do not want to incur any more costs at the expense of taxpayers’ money as you are suggesting.

I thank you, Sir.

Mr Simuusa (Nchanga): Mr Speaker, a total of almost US$15 million was spent on this case, which has resulted in an acquittal for President Chiluba. I would like to find out from His Honour the Vice-President and Minister of Justice why the Government still went ahead to make this expenditure and why, as a lawyer, he, himself, who was also involved in that case did not advise the Government against spending this amount of money, having known that it would result in an acquittal?

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice: Mr Speaker, the hon. Member was not listening. This case had several defendants, but why do you only pick on one defendant? From this particular judgment, we have recovered properties, so it was alright to pursue this case. We had even engaged an asset tracing company called Ovag based in the United Kingdom to try and recover taxpayers’ money and we recovered money from other defendants. Likewise, here in Zambia, we recovered money from some defendants. Therefore, it was worthwhile to pursue that particular case.

I thank you, Sir.

Dr Scott (Lusaka Central): Mr Speaker, I presume His Honour the Vice-President and Learned Minister of Justice has become mindful of your frequent warnings to members of the Executive that they must anticipate follow-up questions. In this case, can he, please, tell us from whom have assets been recovered and what the total quantity was? I am sure he has the schedule there with him.

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice: Mr Speaker, I know that a separate question has been asked on the assets which have been recovered. There were defendants like Meer Care and Desai, Shansonga and others. Those are some of the defendants I can mention from whom properties were recovered, including a company called Jabany Properties Day Square in Belgium.

I thank you, Sir.

Colonel Chanda (Kanyama): Mr Speaker, I would like to find out from His Honour the Vice-President and Minister of Justice whether the revocation of a practising licence for a named Judge in the United Kingdom was as a result of inter alia exchange of money between that judge and us.

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice: Mr Speaker that is a false allegation. Our Government is a decent Government. We do not get involved in such things.

I thank you, Sir.

Mr Mwamba: What about corruption?

Mr Kambwili (Roan): Mr Speaker, His Honour the Vice-President stated that as Attorney-General that time, he advised the Government to register the London Judgment and that the present Attorney-General has advised the Government that it would be an exercise in futility. Would His Honour the Vice-President confirm that the present Attorney-General is more knowledgeable and intelligent than the former?

Laughter

Mr Speaker: That is not tenable and there is no way you can morally deal with an issue like that. I will give you a chance to ask another question if you wish.

Mr Kambwili: Mr Speaker, are there any possibilities that when the Government’s change this London Judgment can be registered?

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice: Mr Speaker, the High Court refused to register it and the Attorney-General has said that looking at the learned judgment which came out from the Judge, it would be a futile exercise to pursue an appeal. There is a given timeframe within which you can file an appeal. Therefore, I doubt whether such a judgment can be registered, especially in view of the very learned judgment which came from the High Court which guided all of us.

I thank you, Sir.

Mr Lubinda (Kabwata): Mr Speaker, in view of the interest that this matter attracts from the public, would His Honour the Vice-President and very Learned Minister of Justice undertake to present a report on this matter from start to end so that people may refer to it in future, especially in pursuit of the fight against corruption?

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice: Mr Speaker, if the hon. Member is interested in getting facts on that particular case, he can conduct a search in the High Court Registry. All the documents are there, if he wants to write a book on the judgment or whatever he wants to do with that information, he can access it because a lot of information has been released in the public domain.

I thank you, Sir.

NDOLA CENTRAL HOSPITAL WATER RETICULATION SYSTEM

183. Mr Kambwili asked the Minister of Health:

(a) how many boreholes provided water to Ndola Central Hospital; and

(b) when the water reticulation system at the hospital was last rehabilitated.

The Deputy Minister of Health (Dr Kalila): Mr Speaker, Ndola Central Hospital has a total of four boreholes. Three boreholes supply water to the main hospital building while one supplies water to the psychiatric wards.

Mr Speaker, the House may wish to note that the main source of water for Ndola Central Hospital is from Kafubu Water and Sewerage Company and the four boreholes merely supplement.

Mr Speaker, the hospital has had no major plumbing works since 2007. However, minor problems have been addressed on a daily basis, using monthly Government grants allocated to the hospital.

Mr Speaker, I thank you.

Mr Kambwili: Mr Speaker, I would like to find out what they are doing to sort out the issue of water at the hospital. It is unacceptable that the relatives of patients …

Mr Speaker: Order!

You are debating.

Mr Kambwili: What are you doing to sort out this problem of water at the Ndola Central Hospital once and for all now that it has become endemic?

Dr Kalila: Mr Speaker, I want to begin by, first, emphasising the fact that the main source of water for this hospital is Kafubu Water and Sewerage Company and that the Government’s efforts to try and solve the problem of intermittent supply from Kafubu Water and Sewerage Company is the reason the Government sunk the four boreholes, three of which supply to the main building to ensure that the core business of health care delivery to the patients is not compromised. What tends to suffer mostly when there is intermittent water supply is the supply to the residential dwellings that exist in Ndola and the training institutions.

Having said that, as a Government, we are also equally aware of this problem and would like to end it once and for all. That is why attempts were made, as early as 2007, to rehabilitate the water reticulation system. Further, the Government continuously engages Kafubu Water and Sewerage Company to try and prioritise the hospital in the supply of water.

I thank you, Sir.

____________{mospagebreak}

BILLS

FIRST READING

THE DAY NURSERIES (Repeal) BILL, 2010

The Minister of Local Government and Housing (Dr Chituwo): Mr Speaker, I beg to present a Bill entitled the Day Nurseries (Repeal) Bill, 2010. The object of the Bill is to repeal the Day Nurseries Act and provide for matters connected with or incidental to the foregoing.

I thank you, Sir.

Mr Speaker: The Bill stands referred to the Committee on Education, Science and Technology. The Committee is required to submit its report on the Bill to the House when it completes its deliberations. Hon. Members who wish to make submissions or amendments to the Bill are free to do so within the programme of work of the Committee.

Thank you.

THE WATER RESOURCES MANAGEMENT BILL, 2010

The Minister of Livestock and Fisheries Development (Mr Machila): Mr Speaker, I beg to introduce a Bill entitled ...

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice rose.

Mr Lubinda: Your boss is standing and you are also standing.

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice (Mr Kunda, SC.): Mr Speaker, I am the bearer of the message from the President recommending favourable ...

Interruptions

Mr Speaker: Order! Who gave you permission to shout like that?

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice may continue.

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice: ... consideration of the Motion which I now lay on the Table.

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice laid the paper on the Table.

Mr Speaker, I beg to present a Bill, the Water Resources Management Bill, 2010. The objects of this Bill are to:

(i) establish the Water Resources Management Authority and define its functions and powers;

(ii) provide for the management, development, conservation, protection and preservation of the water resource and its ecosystems;

(iii) provide for the equitable, reasonable and sustainable utilisation of the water resource;

(iv) ensure the right to draw or take water for domestic and non-commercial purposes, and that the poor and vulnerable members of the society  have an adequate and sustainable source of water free from any charges;

(v) create an enabling environment for adaptation to climate change;

(vi)  provide for the constitution, functions and composition of catchment councils, subcatchment councils and water users associations;

(vii) provide for international and regional co-operation in, and equitable and sustainable utilisation of, shared water resources;

(viii) provide for the domestication and implementation of the basic principles and rules of International Law relating to the environment and shared water resources as specified in the treaties, conventions and agreements to which Zambia is a State Party;

(ix) repeal and replace the Water Act, 1949; and

(x)  provide for matters connected with or incidental to the foregoing.

I thank you, Sir.

Mr Speaker: The Bill stands referred to the Committee on Energy, Environment and Tourism. The Committee is required to submit its report on the Bill to the House when it completes its deliberations. Hon. Members who wish to make submissions or amendments to the Bill are free to do so within the programme of work of the Committee.

Thank you.

THE URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNERS BILL, 2010

Dr Chituwo: Mr Speaker, I am the bearer of the message from the President, recommending favourable consideration of the Motion which I now lay on the Table.

Dr Chituwo laid the paper on the Table.

Interruptions

Mr Speaker: Order!

Dr Chituwo: Mr Speaker, I beg to present a Bill entitled the Urban and Regional Planners, 2010. The object of this Bill is to:

(i) establish the Zambia Institute of Planners and provide for its functions;

(ii) provide for the registration of planners and planning firms and regulate their professional conduct; and

(iii)  provide for matters connected with or incidental to the foregoing.

I thank you, Sir.

Mr Speaker: The Bill stands referred to the Committee on Local Governance, Housing and Chiefs’ Affairs. The Committee is required to submit its report on the Bill to the House when it completes its deliberations. Hon. Members who wish to make submissions or amendments to the Bill are free to do so within the programme of work of the Committee.

Thank you.

THE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT BILL, 2010

The Minister of Tourism, Environment and Natural Resources (Ms Namugala): Mr Speaker, I beg to present a Bill entitled the Environmental Management Bill whose objects are:

(i)  to continue the existence of the Environmental Council of Zambia (ECZ) and rename it as the Zambia Environmental Management Agency;

(ii) provide for integrated environmental management and the protection and conservation of the environment and the sustainable management and use of natural resources;

(iii) provide for the preparation of the State of the Environment Report, environmental management strategies and other plans for environmental management and sustainable development;

(iv) provide for the conduct of strategic environmental assessments of proposed legislation, policies, plans and programmes likely to have an impact on environmental management;

(v) provide for the prevention and control of pollution and environmental degradation; provide for public participation in environmental decision-making and access to environmental information;

(vi) establish the Environment Fund; provide for environmental audit and monitoring;

(vii) facilitate the implementation of international environmental agreements and conventions to which Zambia is a party;

(viii) repeal and replace the Environmental Protection and pollution Control Act, 1990; and

(ix) provide for matters connected with, or incidental to, the foregoing.

I thank you, Sir.

Mr Speaker: The Bill stands referred to the Committee on Energy, Environment and Tourism. The Committee is required to submit its report on the Bill to the House when it completes its deliberations. Hon. Members who wish to make submissions or amendments to the Bill are free to do so within the programme of work of the Committee.

Thank you.

_______________


MOTION

SUSPENSION OF STANDING ORDERS 20, 21 (1) AND 101

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice (Mr Kunda, SC.): Mr Speaker, I beg to move that standing orders 20 and 21(1), if necessary and Standing Order 101 be suspended to enable the House complete all business on the Order Paper and all matters arising therefrom and that on such completion, the House do adjourn sine die.

Mr Speaker, this meeting of the House commenced on 17th September and, as of today, the House will have been sitting for a total of forty-one days. This Motion is aimed at enabling the House conclude its business and allow hon. Members return to their constituencies to attend to other equally important national duties.

During this period, 195 Questions were placed on the Order Paper and ably answered by the Executive.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Hon. Opposition Members: Aah!

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice: In addition, seventeen Government Bills were presented and considered by the House. Further, eight more Government Bills were presented and will come up for consideration in the next meeting. Furthermore, a total of twenty annual reports from the Government and quasi-Government departments were tabled and nineteen ministerial statements explaining Government policies and clarifying issues raised by hon. Members were also made during this meeting.

Mr Speaker, in addition to the Business I have outlined above, the House, by the end of today, will have considered and voted for the moneys required for implementing all the developmental projects in the country.

Allow me to thank all the hon. Members for their dedication to duty and constructive and invaluable contributions made during the conduct of business of the House.

Hon. Members: Hear, hear!

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice: Mr Speaker, during this meeting, we welcomed four new hon. Members of Parliament following the by-elections in Chilanga, Mpulungu, Chifubu and Luena Parliamentary constituencies. Let me, once again, congratulate the new hon. Members and welcome them to the House. I wish them well in their political careers.

Sir, let me remind the hon. Members that the rainy season has just begun and we are hopeful that the nation will, again, experience favourable weather conditions. I wish to request them to utilise the recess to encourage our people to work hard on the land so that we can, yet again, have a bumper harvest this season. Hon. Members should lead by example by fully participating in agricultural production. This will, in turn, encourage the people to be more productive.

Mr Speaker, the hon. Minister of Agriculture and Co-operatives has already assured this House that the distribution of farming inputs is in progress. I wish to urge all hon. Members to be active supervisors of the distribution exercise so that our wish to experience yet another bumper harvest becomes a reality.

Sir, the revised Farmer Input Support Programme (FISP) has favoured more people this year than last season. This will translate into more people participating in farming and more homes having food security.

Mr Speaker, hon. Members should be fully involved in the Youth Empowerment Fund which was unveiled to this House by the hon. Minister of Sport, Youth and Child Development.

Let me reiterate what the hon. Minister stated by encouraging all hon. Members to assist youths in their respective constituencies to fully utilise the available opportunities that will improve their lives and enable them contribute to national development. Let us go back to our constituencies and assist the youth to access the funds.

Mr Speaker, may I take this opportunity to express my profound gratitude to you, the hon. Madam Deputy Speaker and the hon. Deputy Chairperson of Committees of the Whole House for the effective and efficient manner in which you handled the proceedings of the House. Your outstanding guidance, fair rulings and wise and effective leadership, no doubt, encouraged and inspired the hon. Members, thereby contributing to the success of the Business of the House.

Sir, allow me, also, to pay tribute to the Clerk of the National Assembly and her staff for the excellent services they rendered to the House.

 I should also commend officers in the Office of the Vice-President as well as officials in the Government ministries and departments who played a part in making the work of this august House a resounding success. I urge them all to continue working hard for the betterment of the country.

Mr Speaker, finally, I wish you and all hon. Members a very happy festive season and a more productive 2011.

Mr Speaker, I beg to move.

Hon. Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Shakafuswa: We want a Christmas bonus.

Mr Speaker: As I call for any further debate, let me reiterate that this Motion simply opens the door for you not to adjourn at 1255 hours today, but when you have adopted and passed the 2011 Budget. That is all the Motion requires and not that you should begin to re-open countrywide debate. As you heard, the mover, His Honour the Vice-President and Minister of Justice, did not do so.

Thank you.

Mr Muntanga (Kalomo Central): Mr Speaker, in support of the Motion presented by his Honour the Vice-President and Minister of Justice, I agree that we need to go and prepare the land. In fact, we were getting worried that the House would sit into December. Therefore, we accept and support the Motion.

In supporting the Motion, I would like to thank the Clerk’s Office for the letter that all of us have just received stating that the Deputy Clerk, who is also sitting at the Clerks’ Table right now is retiring today. We agree with the contents of the letter that was written by the Clerk of the National Assembly recognising the services of the Deputy Clerk that come to an end today. It is a good thing and I record this in my support for the Motion.

Mr Speaker, I thank you.

Dr Scott (Lusaka Central): Mr Speaker, I thank you for the opportunity to support the Motion and I want to reiterate anything that His Honour the Vice-President and Minister of Justice has said.

However, I just want to make an appeal to the Executive, in so far as they are able to influence the policies of the Electoral Commission of Zambia (ECZ), that it will be a great pity if the House rose today only to find the Voters’ Registration Exercise closing on Tuesday. My appeal is that, now that the ECZ is in our constituencies and we are aware that there is a tripartite election looming at some unspecified date next year, we will be able to continue with the Voters’ Registration Exercise so that we achieve as close as we can get to the ideal of this country of one man one vote, meaning one person, of course, of any gender or size.

With that, I am also appealing to all political party leaders, here, that in preparation for that election, we start getting our parties organised. As for me, I will be in Choma tomorrow to attend the provincial conference for the Patriotic Front (PF) which will be held there. We will finish our provincial conferences by January and go to what we call a general conference and national convention in February. Therefore, we will be ready, but whether the MMD is ready by that time, Mr Speaker, I cannot assure you.

Laughter

Dr Scott: It is not my business to lecture other people on their political affairs. Our comrades in the United Party for National Development (UPND) …

Mr Speaker: Order!

Dr Scott: … will, of course, be discussing …

Mr Speaker: Order!

Dr Scott: … I thank you, Mr Speaker.

Mr Speaker: I just want to put it on record that the word ‘comrade’ was adjudged to be unparliamentary in this House. There were reasons given at that time and they are still valid.

Mr Hamududu (Bweengwa): Mr Speaker, I thank you for giving me the opportunity to support the Adjournment Motion which was moved by His Honour the Vice-President and Minister of Justice.

However, I would like to just raise one issue which is of great importance. As we go on recess, especially that we shall be sliding into an election year, all political parties in this country need to reflect deeply on whether they are living up to the expectations of their people. It is very important that, in this recess, we take time to really consider what our forefathers and fathers fought for.

Our forefathers crafted the National Anthem and envisioned a Zambia that would be a land of joy, work and unity. United we are stronger. United we are victors. There are too many divisions in the country, but our people want us to unite so that we can make social and economic progress. The people out there are not interested in retaining a king or installing a new one because they want social and economic progress and that must be our commitment as politicians.

Mr Speaker, our people have suffered in a country that is very rich. As I conclude, I want to say that Zambia has all the pre-conditions for take-off, but divisions are pulling it back. Let us be united and become Zambians both in the Ruling and opposition parties because we only have one country and people want unity, work and joy. They want nothing, but social and economic progress and not presidency, presidency. They want a plan of action to deliver them from squalor.

Mr Speaker, I thank you.

Hon. Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Chisala (Chilubi): Mr Speaker, I thank you for according me this opportunity to contribute to the Motion on the Floor of this debating Chamber.

Sir, I want to state that, as I support the Motion on the Floor, it is imperative for hon. Members of Parliament as well as the Executive to realise that this year, the Government of the Republic of Zambia, through the Ministry of Education, has delayed the release of funds for the construction of schools and teachers’ houses. In this respect, I want to remind the Executive that it is imperative for them to promptly release the funds so that the construction of classroom blocks in various parts of this country can take off.

In the same vein, I would like to say that, this year, the Government has also delayed the release of the Constituency Development Fund (CDF). The CDF plays a vital role in development. Therefore, I am requesting the Government to ensure that before the end of December, the CDF is released so that we can make use of it.

I thank you, Sir.

Mr Kambwili (Roan): Mr Speaker, I thank you for giving me the opportunity to support the Motion on the Floor of the House.

Sir, in supporting the Motion, I would like to take Hon. Chisala’s debate regarding the CDF as my own. I would also like to emphasise to the hon. Minister that as we go on recess, we need the CDF because some of us use it to buy fertiliser and, of course, pay for school fees for some vulnerable children in society.

Hon. Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Kambwili: Further, I would like to thank all hon. Members of this House for the peace that has prevailed during our deliberations. I also request everybody to take this peace to our cadres. When we meet here as Parliament, we mingle and talk to each other in a very polite and civilised manner but, when we go out, we allow our cadres to fight. Let us go and tell our cadres that we need peace and condemn violence in Zambia. As we go, let us avoid creating imaginary cases against opponents just to derail the mood of campaign.

With these few words, I would like to thank you, Sir.{mospagebreak}

Mr Milupi (Luena): Mr Speaker, I thank you for giving me the opportunity to support the Motion on the Floor of the House. From the outset, let me mention that I support the Motion to adjourn the House sine die.

Sir, I would like to briefly add a few words on the CDF. His Honour Vice-President and Minister of Justice and others in Government have stated that a lot of money has been released to the Ministry of Local Government and Housing. The House is about to adjourn and this will give us an opportunity to play our other role as hon. Members of Parliament much more closely. This is as regards the interaction with our electorates in our constituencies. That is the representative’s role and part of it is to solve some of the issues that come up. However, over the years, this House has voted for this money to allow hon. Members of Parliament get involved at the grassroots because some of the projects that are undertaken are very important.

Mr Speaker, ideally, this money is supposed to be released at the beginning of the year so that we have a full year to undertake projects. It is pointless for the Government to tell us now that the money has been released. At the moment, I know that not a single district council or constituency has received this money, but today is 26th November, 2010. This is not good planning.

Sir, the other point that I would like to mention is with regard to the Farmer Input Support Programme (FISP). I have always talked about the efficiency of our agriculture sector with regard to the production of maize. Today is almost the end of November, but there are still many places, including my own constituency, where fertiliser and other farming inputs have not been distributed. This is adding to the inefficiency of this programme.

As we go back to our constituencies, we seek the Government to also be proactive in making the work of the hon. Members of Parliament much easier so that funds which we have been voted for in this House are released on time. What is the difficulty, His Honour the Vice-President?

I thank you, Sir.

   Mr Shakafuswa (Katuba): Mr Speaker, I thank you for giving me the opportunity to support the Motion to adjourn the House sine die. First of all, I would like to thank you for leading this House in a very proper and mature manner. I also want to thank His Honour the Vice-President and Minister of Justice for showing capable leadership.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Shakafuswa: Further, I thank all hon. Members of Parliament for representing their people well and for talking on their behalf in a very effective manner.

Hon. Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Shakafuswa: Mr Speaker, as we adjourn, I would like to say, as Hon. Kambwili has already said, that when we talk on behalf of our people, we should not do it with malice. It is just to show that we, as a House, are very committed to the calls of this country and the development of our people because we are all looking for solutions which will enable us make Zambia a better country to live in.

Mr Speaker, I also want to thank you for the Christmas Cards which have been put in our pigeon holes although I would like to say that you should have added a Christmas bonus …

Laughter

Mr Shakafuswa: … to enable us go and perform well and, at least, be with our families.

Hon. Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Shakafuswa: Most of us spend a lot of time outside our family circles and I think we should not be shy about it. The people should not think that hon. Members of Parliament are just people who fight politically. We should also enjoy Christmas and pray to God so that we have a better crop and a bumper harvest, as the Vice-President and Minister of Justice said, and prepare adequately.

The hon. Minister of Agriculture and Co-operatives should talk to the District Agriculture Co-ordinators (DACOs) because people are still spending nights at the Boma without dispatch notes. Like I said yesterday, people have been sleeping at the Boma for the last two weeks, but they have not been able to get their dispatch notes. Please, let us not slow down the speed at which the fertiliser and inputs have been delivered. Let these inputs go under the soil on time so that we can feed our people.

Mr Speaker, on that note and emphasis on the Christmas bonus, I would like to thank you.

Mr Kambwili: Hear, hear!

Mr Ngoma (Sinda): Mr Speaker, thank you for according me this opportunity to contribute to this adjournment Motion.

Mr Speaker, I wish to thank you most sincerely for the manner in which you have guided the House and also, the Clerks at Table for a job well done. As we adjourn sine die today, there is just one issue which I feel I have to raise. Of late, there has been debate of the National Constitutional Conference (NCC) vis a vis, the 50 per cent plus one clause. Tension is almost being ignited  regarding it. I want to appeal to all hon. Members of Parliament that as we are going out there, it is our duty to go and explain to the people about how the issue of the 50 per cent plus one has been referred to a referendum. This was not made by any political party in this country, but by the NCC. That has to be clearly explained to the people of Zambia.

Sir, a few weeks ago, I remember how one hon. Member of Parliament from the Opposition debated and condemned the Movement for Multi-party Democracy (MMD) for having not included anything as far as constitutional reforms are concerned in this sitting. I wish to thank His Honour the Vice-President who gave a categorical statement regarding the NCC last week. During the Vice-President’s Question Time some time back, the Vice-President said that in a few days, the Government was going to say something about the Constitution. His Honour the Vice-President says something and then you say that whatever he has said is useless. That is not the way it ought to be. The issue of the 50 per cent plus one was not brought up by a single political party. The NCC was very clear on how decisions were going to be arrived at. The NCC suggested that the issue should be thrown to the people of Zambia to decide upon it. Therefore, the hon. Members of Parliament should go out there and reduce the tension regarding this issue. If we do not do that, we will be sending a very wrong signal to the people out there. That is why it was important that all political parties and players should have participated in that NCC process.

Interruptions
 
Mr Ngoma: The scenario that is being created is as though somebody just woke up and said that 50 per cent plus one will not be in our constitution. It is the duty of every well-meaning Zambian as well as progressive hon. Member of Parliament to go and tell his or her constituents about this.

Mr Speaker, with those few words, I thank you.

Mr Lubinda (Kabwata): Mr Speaker, let me just agree with my colleagues who spoke about the CDF and the need for it to be released. In agreeing with His Honour the Vice-President that we do adjourn sine die today, I want to just say one or two things.

Sir, firstly, I would like to say that there are some outstanding questions whose answers, unfortunately, some of us will not have when we go back to our constituents. Like the hon. Member for Luena said, during recess, that is when we interact the most with our constituents. That is when they ask us a lot of questions. I would have been very happy had His Honour the Vice-President requested the hon. Minister of Finance and National Planning to clarify a number of issues, particularly, on a very important process of floating the shares of the Konkola Copper Mines (KCM) on the London Stock Exchange.

Mr Speaker, the people that I represent and the people that many of us represent have many questions regarding the floatation of the KCM shares. Some of the questions have to do with whether or not, the shares of Zambia Consolidated Copper Mines Investment Holdings (ZCCM-IH) which shares are held in trust on behalf of the people of Zambia shall also be subject to floatation by the new company called Konkola Resources Plc. If these shares are not to be part of the floatation, the hon. Minister would have done well to inform the Zambian people what that would mean in the long run on the total share holding of the Zambian people in a company that is mining their dear resources. The people are also supposed to know wheather the shares held by Vedanta which are now to be transferred to Konkola Resources Plc shall be floated at a higher par value than the current value without affecting the value of ZCCM-IH held shares. The people also need to know weather in this effect, the holding of Zambians in KCM will be diluted. These questions will beg for answers which I am afraid, not many of us have. I have to put it on record that on behalf of my constituents, I did put notice for an urgent question related to that issue, but unfortunately, it did not see the Order Paper. How I wish that the question managed to get on the Order Paper because I am sure His Honour the Vice-President and his colleague in the Ministry of Finance and National Planning would have provided the much-needed answers. I am afraid that now, we will have to go and discuss these matters in the press with a lot of speculation.

Sir, secondly, as we adjourn sine die, today, my colleagues from Lusaka and myself are going to our constituencies afraid as to whether our constituents will receive us or not. As I mentioned during the adjournment of last Session, His Honour the Vice-President who runs the Disaster Management and Mitigation Unit (DMMU) failed to mitigate floods in Lusaka in March. Now, the rainy season is here and not much work has been done. No work is being done by the Office of the Vice-President in Kanyama and Matero. Very little work is being done in Kabwata Constituency and this is being done by residents themselves. 

Sir, the same applies to the Bombay Drainage which should have been done in March. Now, it is being opened up without having any culverts and thereby, disturbing the flow of business in Kamwala Trading Area. I would have wanted His Honour the Vice-President, when proposing adjournment, to state what programme he has put in place to ensure that this year, or early next year, he does not relocate the people of Misisi Compound to the Independence Stadium. These would have been comforting words from the Vice-President. I know that he is already preparing himself to fly over Misisi Compound in Kamwala when the area is flooded. We would have received a very good Christmas present from His Honour the Vice-President had he assured us that he has put in place measures to ensure that there will be no floods in Lusaka this year.

Sir, with those few words, I would like to join others in wishing you a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year.

I thank you, Sir.

Major Chizhyuka (Namwala): Mr Speaker, thank you for giving me an opportunity to contribute to the Motion presented by His Honour the Vice-President. I would like to mention that the people of Namwala have tempestuous hearts.

Sir, firstly, allow me to urge the Executive on your right to have a focused view on the movement of the economies of the world. About a year and half ago, an economic crunch in the United States of America (USA) led to an economic turmoil on more than half the globe. It spread to countries in Europe, parts of Asia and some weak economies in Africa.

In the last few weeks, as a result of what occurred in Ireland, there is another emergent turmoil with the United Kingdom doubting whether they should remain in the euro zone.

Mr Speaker, these things are happening in buoyant economies while the Asian giants, China and India, have maintained certain levels of control in their economies, which are different from the capitalist world, and are able to grow their economies with stability.

How is it possible that while the rest of the capitalist world in America and Europe are suffering from economic turmoil, China and India, who have super control over most of the parastatal companies that do business all over the world, are managing and have remained stable? These are economies that are growing at unprecedented phenomenal rates in the history of their economies. As a matter of fact, it is recorded that the amount of prosperity China has achieved in the last thirty years took America 280 years to achieve. 

As we manage the economy of our country I would like to advise that we should take a leaf and see whether we can create an interface or equilibrium in the manner that we project our economy.

Mr Speaker: Order! You are not debating the Motion. 

You may continue but wind up.

Major Chizhyuka: Mr Speaker, I thank you for your guidance. 

Mr Speaker, not long ago I asked Hon. Vernon Mwaanga whether it was possible that in the previous Government so many schools and hospitals could be built in one span of time. Hon. Mwaanga told me that it was done over a period of many years.

Mr Speaker, in 2008, 1,500 classrooms were built. In 2009, 2,500 classrooms were built with 2,000 more projected for construction. This is unprecedented in the history of mother Zambia.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Major Chizhyuka: After having deliberated in this august House, we are going back to our constituencies …

Dr Scott left the Assembly Chamber.

Major Chizhyuka: I am surprised that Hon. Guy Scott is walking out.

Laughter

Major Chizhyuka: Mr Speaker, we are going back to our constituencies amid unprecedented levels of development.

When I first came to this House in 2006, there was no road to Choma. Now the people of Namwala have a tarred road to Choma.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Major Chizhyuka: Mr Speaker, when I first came to this House, the people of Namwala did not have a technical girls’ school. Now they have one.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Major Chizhyuka: Mr Speaker, when I came to Parliament, there was so much congestion at Lubanga School which was built by Chief Mukobela. I am going to back to a new school built at a cost of K8 billion. 

This Government has done extremely well …

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Major Chizhyuka: …at levels which are unprecedented in the history of our politics.

Mr Speaker, I wish to urge the Government to go back and show these development projects to the people. I am advising this Government to do this because we believe in building on our gains. If these gains are not shown to the people, in large constituencies like Kasempa, you may not know what development is in one corner of the constituency. You need to show the extent to which these constituencies have turned around in a bid to make sure that the people know what you are doing. For instance, last time when I was …

Mr Speaker: Order!

While the hon. Member may be advancing very important points, he has re-opened debate. The House has heard him say these things over and over again. Can the hon. Cabinet Ministers and Deputy Ministers that want to debate be brief as well.

The Minister of Health (Mr Simbao): Mr Speaker, I rise to support the Motion on the Floor. I would like to state that this Government has ended this year on a very good note in terms of diagnostic equipment. We have brought into the country almost all the diagnostic equipment that any other country can. 

At the moment, we have the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) which scans the brain and spinal code. I would like to request all hon. Members of Parliament to find time to go and have their brains scanned …

Laughter

Mr Simbao: … and their spinal codes as well.

Mr Speaker, this is a serious request because my friends do not understand that for most of them who are forty and above a lot of things have changed in their bodies, especially the brain and spinal code. It is important to have these things checked to prolong lives.  

Mr Speaker, we have also brought in eye diagnostic equipment. The eye is one organ that people must have checked because it does reveal health problems in one’s body. We should, therefore all go and have our eyes checked, especially at UTH where all the equipment is available.

We have also brought in a Computerised Tomography (CT) scan which can check many other body parts. It is important that we are not found with growths in our bodies. With a CT scan, we can catch growths early and have them treated before they grow because the chances for survival are higher.

Mr Speaker, we also have a four dimension, I have forgotten the name …

Laughter

Mr Simbao: We also have a four dimension ultra-sound which can help detect early problems of the liver and kidneys.

I would like to appeal to hon. Members that they should not feel healthy if they have not had a check up. They should go and have these checks. Equally, they should take this message to their constituencies. These facilities are now available in this country. They must create an opportunity to have themselves checked. We will subsidise medical check-ups for hon. Members starting next year.

Mr Speaker, I thank you.

The Minister of Education (Ms Siliya): Mr Speaker, in supporting the Motion, I would like to make two points very quickly, the first being that I take the words of Hon. Hamududu as my own and re-emphasise that on this side of the House we have made a lot of effort, particularly this year, to ensure that all citizens, especially women, participate in the decision-making process. The President even went further and appointed twelve judges. This was an unprecedented move.

I also wish to emphasise that, as we go on recess, we need to take time to reflect upon the fact that the 50 per cent representation of women in politics that we keep talking about will be a futile exercise unless we can galvanise support and cultivate interest for women to join politics in our own political parties. For women to become interested in politics, we need to provide a conducive atmosphere in which they do not feel violated in any manner, whether it is political, emotional or even in terms of abusive language.

Mr Speaker, the second point is that, we, in the Ministry of Education, will continue, as we have done in 2010, in 2011, with the infrastructure development programme. Coupled with that, we will also do an overhaul of the human resource system which, we believe, is critical in terms of responding to the immediate needs of the teachers, students and also the community.

We, as a ministry, will continue to urge hon. Members of Parliament to provide leadership in encouraging the family to participate in the education of their children. The words of Mahatima Ghandhi that: “Be the change you want to see in the world,” must continue to apply to each one of us. Let us work together because, together, we can do it in ensuring that we transform our country for higher prosperity.

 I thank you, Mr Speaker.  

The Minister of Local Government and Housing (Dr Chituwo): Mr Speaker, in supporting this Motion, I just want to allay the anxieties of some hon. Members of Parliament with regard to the Government’s commitment to meeting the needs of its communities. In this regard, I just want to state that, in fact, the crediting of the CDF to the 120 constituencies that submitted their returns timely to our ministry started this week. If hon. Members of Parliament would check their accounts, they would confirm that the money has already been credited to many of their CDF accounts.

Mr Speaker, we are still awaiting the returns of the CDF for the remaining thirty constituencies and, once that is done, we will start the process. K80 billion has already been disbursed to various CDF accounts.

Secondly, I just want to state that my ministry works very closely with the DMMU. In this regard, the referred to Bombay drainage and other drainages are there to prevent flooding from taking place rather than reacting to disasters.

 I thank you, Mr Speaker.

 Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice: Sir, I just wish to thank all hon. Members for the support.

 I thank you, Mr Speaker.

 Hon. Members: Hear, hear!

Question put and agreed to.

SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATES NO. 1 OF 2010

The Minister of Finance and National Planning (Dr Musokotwane): Mr Speaker, I beg to move that the House do now resolve into Committee of Supply to consider Supplementary Estimates of Expenditure No. 1 of 2010.

Sir, I am a bearer of a message from His Excellency the President recommending favourable consideration of the Motion I now lay on the Table.

Mr Speaker, …

Business was suspended from 1045 hours to 1100 hours.

[MR SPEAKER in the Chair]

Dr Musokotwane: Mr Speaker, when business was suspended, I had just moved a Motion for the House to resolve into Committee of Supply to consider Supplementary Estimates of expenditure for the fiscal year, 2010. These have been prepared in accordance with the requirements of Article 115 Section (2) (d) of the Zambian Constitution.

Sir, by virtue of the authority conveyed in the above mentioned article of our Constitution, I am honoured to present the Supplementary Estimates of expenditure covering the Financial Year 1st January to 31st December, 2010.

Sir, the total supplementary request stands at K3,950.8 billion. Of this amount, a total of K278.4 billion represents funds released to institutions towards the end of the financial year, 2009, but carried forward and spent in 2010 while K550.6 billion are savings declared within the approved budget arising from variations on slow moving budget lines. 

From the same total amount, a sum of K101.1 billion represents funds that were released directly to institutions in 2010 by the co-operating partners, but were not part of the 2010 approved Estimates of Expenditure.

Sir, allow me now to highlight some of the areas where substantial amounts have been allocated.

Under Head 05 – Electoral Commission of Zambia, an extra amount of K76.7 billion has been provided to cover the cost of conducting by-elections and to meet extra cost of extending the period for the continuous voter registration in preparation for the 2011 general elections. Similarly, an amount of K21.0 billion, under the Ministry of Home Affairs, has been provided for the extended mobile registration exercise.

Mr Speaker, an amount of K300.0 billion has been included under the Ministry of Energy and Water Development to enable the Government meet the subsidy cost arising from the low prices of fuels in the country when the cost on the international market was very high.

Under Head 21 – Loans and Investments, under my ministry, a total sum of about K500 billion has been included to largely cater for extra spending on some selected roads. Under Head 37, which is my ministry also, a total amount of K704.8 billion has been allowed of which K621.6 billion is meant to cover the cost of 15 per cent salaries and wages awarded to civil servants and bearers of constitutional offices. You may wish to note that an amount of K359.6 billion is moved from the non-spending Vote under Head 99 to a spending Vote under Head 37. Other notable supplementary requests include provisions to procure accountable documents and other revenue generating documents, to pay for suppliers of goods and services; and to finalise the preparation of the Sixth National Development Plan (SNDP) which will be launched before the end of this year.

Sir, an amount of K35 billion, under the Ministry of Community Development and Social Services, to register donor funds not accounted for at the time the 2010 Budget was approved. This money is counterpart meant to support the Social Cash Transfer Scheme being implemented by the ministry. Similarly, an amount of K43.0 billion from co-operating partners has been allocated to the Ministry of Health as this was not included in the approved Budget.

Mr Speaker, for the Ministry of Agriculture and Co-operatives is a proposed extra allocation of K1,425.1 billion for supplementary spending. Out of this amount, K1,266.1 is meant for the purchase of farmers the bumper harvest crop by the Food Reserve Agency (FRA), while the balance is for financing the Farming Inputs Support Programme (FISP) for the 2010/2011 agricultural season.

Under Constitutional and Statutory Expenditure, a total sum of K175.5 billion has been allowed to largely cover domestic debt interest payments with savings coming from some budget lines within the same Head.

In brief and conclusion, Sir, the 2010 Supplementary Estimates of Expenditure are about to carry over funds from the previous years, new donor money not contained in the 2009 Budget, adjustment to account for extra revenues and some additional allocations to some Heads, especially under the Ministry of Agriculture and Co-operatives while reducing on others.

Mr Speaker, I, therefore, seek the support of this House in approving the Supplementary Estimates of Expenditure for 2010.

I thank you, Sir.

Dr Musokotwane: Mr Speaker, I wish to thank the House for the support.

I thank you, Mr Speaker.

Hon. Members: Hear, hear!

Question put and agreed to.

________

COMMITTEE OF SUPPLY

[THE DEPUTY CHAIRPERSON OF COMMITTEES in the
 Chair]

SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATES NO. 1 OF 2010

Vote 01 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 02 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 03 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 04 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 05 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 06 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 07 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 08 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 09 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 10 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 11 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 12 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 13 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 14 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 15 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 17 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 20 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 21 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 26 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 27 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 29 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 31 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 37 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 45 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 46 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 51 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 64 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 65 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 68 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 76 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 77 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 78 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 80 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 85 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 87 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 88 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 89 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 90 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 91 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 92 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 93 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 94 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 95 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 96 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 97 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 98 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 99 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Hon. Members: Hear, hear!

The Deputy Chairperson: Order!

____________

HOUSE RESUMED

[MR SPEAKER in the Chair]

Supplementary Estimates No. 1 of 2010 reported approved.

Report adopted.

Question put and agreed to and Mr Speaker appointed the Minister of Finance and National Planning to be a committee of one to bring in the necessary Bill to give effect hereto at a later date.

___________

BILL

The following Bill was read the third time and passed:

The Customs and Excise (Amendment) Bill, 2010

___________

COMMITTEE OF SUPPLY

[THE DEPUTY CHAIRPERSON OF COMMITTEES in the
Chair]

VOTES 90 to 98 – (Office of the President – Province: Lusaka – K34,260,873,301, Copperbelt – K43,809,691,038, Central – K35,229,577,750, Northern – K45,657,610,904, Western – K35,755,938,936, Eastern – K39,691,869,036, Luapula – K35,654,837,542, North-Western – K35,733,755,711 and Southern – K43,645,920,162).

(Consideration resumed)

Mr Chongo (Mwense): Mr Chairperson, I thank you for giving me an opportunity to resume my debate. Yesterday, I indicated that we had received a lot of money for fisheries in Luapula Province. I am imploring the Government to consider assisting us to prudently use these funds so that they can positively impact on the lives of people in Luapula Province, many of whom depend on fishing activities.

We do not want to see a situation like what happened with the Programme for Luapula Agriculture and Rural Development (PLARD). We received a lot of money in Luapula for the last three years under this programme and probably we could have received K7 billion for each district had it worked properly. We are losing good opportunities to raise the standard of living of our people because huge amounts of money which this Government is sourcing for its people for a good cause end up not being utilised as intended by the Government. So, my appeal to the Government is for it to closely monitor the use of these funds so that we do not keep losing good opportunities to develop our province.

Mr Chairperson, let me also talk about mining in the province. As stated before, Luapula Province is endowed with a lot of mineral resources such as copper and manganese. We have the best copper in Zambia, especially in Chienge District where we have grades ranging between 11 to 19 per cent. This is very good copper, but we have a problem of exploitation of this resource because we do not have enough electrical power to run the processing equipment that may be required. It is equally costly for anyone to get into mining and start hauling the material from that far onto the Copperbelt where it can be processed. So, what we are asking for in Luapula is electricity. I hope this Government will keep its promise of looking into this matter.

We have talked a lot about the problems that we have pertaining to roads and I hope the Government has listened because we are told it is a listening Government. I think what has been said is sufficient. We have cried and hon. Ministers have answered. We just hope this problem will be given priority and the necessary action action. Even the little money under the Rural Roads Unit (RRU) that was last week reported to be unused last week can go a long way if only hon. Ministers and other stakeholders concerned can quickly intervene.

Mr Chairperson, a matter related to that of RRU is that of major roads in Luapula. It must be known that this Government has committed itself to providing a pontoon at Kashiba in Mwense District. This will provide a link to Kasenga in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) which is the closest area to Lubumbashi. The Congolese Government is tarring the road from Lubumbashi to Kasenga which is a stretch of about 210 km.

If we can also work on the Kashiba/Mwenda/Luwingu Road, we are going to shorten the route between Lubumbashi in the DRC and Nakonde. There will be a lot of traffic which will result in a lot of business for people in Luapula Province. Therefore, I am asking the Ministry of Works and Supply to consider working on this stretch of only 72 km from Kashiba to Mwenda and joins Mung’anga which leads into the Mansa/Luwingu Road.

  I hope the hon. Minister will conclude. If this road was opened, we were going to raise the profile of Mwense District economically without any doubt. This is my prayer and we hope that the Government is listening.

Finally, I want to congratulate the newly appointed Cardinal Merdado Mazombwe on behalf of the people of Luapula Province and the Catholics in the province at large. They have sent words of encouragement to the Cardinal and we hope, as people of Luapula, his appointment will be of benefit to Zambia. We know that this appointment is because of his wise leadership. At that level, obviously, he will provide leadership within the Catholic Church so that the Church can unite this country to prosperity.

Therefore, the people of Luapula are so grateful to the Catholic Church for elevating an indigenous Zambian to that level.

With these few words, I beg to support the Vote.

Hon. Members: Hear, hear!

Mr V. Mwale (Chipangali): Mr Chairperson, I thank you for giving me this opportunity to support the Vote on the Floor. In doing so, I have four to five points to make on the Vote for the Eastern Province.

To start with, I want to appreciate the statement that was issued yesterday in this House by the hon. Minister of Finance and National Planning over the review of the taxes that will be applicable to the mining sector. On behalf of the people of Eastern Province, I thank the hon. Minister for that because we are now going to raise more than K1 trillion over and above what we should have raised from the mining sector.

Coming to the issue of agriculture in the Eastern Province, as a province, we have done very well. We have contributed significantly to the high levels of production of maize, cotton, ground nuts. We are very thankful to this Government for the policies that have enabled us have the high yields that we have seen in the province. We hope that this Government will help us with the storage facilities, especially maize storage probably this year or next year since we do not have silos there to enhance the storage capacity of maize.

Mr Chairperson, I would want to ask the provincial administration to lobby the Ministry of Commerce, Trade and Industry so that we can venture into other businesses instead of concentrating on maize, cotton, sunflower and tobacco production. I want the hon. Minister of Commerce, Trade and Industry to listen to my debate. Hon. Minister, we need a multi-facility economic zone (MFEZ) in the Eastern Province.

Mr Sichilima: Tamwafishiba nokufishiba!

Mr V. Mwale: We need this facility because it is going to add value to farm produce in the Eastern Province. We do not want to export raw cotton, but finished products such as shirts, suits and other cotton fabrics, hence the need for an MFEZ. I know that in this country, in our population policy, we have said that we want to strike a balance in terms of population. We do not want people to keep migrating to urban areas such as Lusaka and Copperbelt provinces. They must also remain in rural areas. Therefore, we want our provincial administration to engage the Ministry of Commerce, Trade and Industry to construct an MFEZ in the Eastern Province, which will add value to our cotton and tobacco.

Mr Chairperson, in the Eastern Province, this year alone, a company called Alliance One has spent about US$80 million buying tobacco from our farmers. When they buy that tobacco, they take it to Malawi for processing, after which it is exported as a Malawian Tobacco. We want to export that tobacco branded as Zambian Tobacco. Therefore, we need a processing plant in the Eastern Province to add value to the tobacco. Our tobacco is exported from Malawi and they get more than us the producers of the tobacco.

Mr Chairperson, there is no way the Eastern Province can be getting jam from Shoprite which is made in South Africa when we have a lot of mangoes that can be processed into mango juice and other products.

We are requesting the provincial administration to speak to the hon. Minister of Commerce, Trade and Industry to construct an MFEZ in our province. We know that the MFEZ will work in Eastern Province because even the products will be bought at reasonable prices since all will be done locally.

In Chadiza and Katete, we also grow a lot of sunflower which can be used to make cooking oil. Hon. Provincial Minister, when you respond to these issues that we are raising on behalf of the Eastern Province, please, come up with good points on what you are going do for the people of Eastern Province.

Furthermore, this MFEZ we are asking for must also have a processing plant for gemstones. We have a lot of gemstones such as aquamarine in the Eastern Province which are exported as rough stones. After processing, they come back to be sold as finished products such as ornaments, rings and many other products at very high prices.

Mr Chairperson, for our farmers to transport their farm produce without difficulty, we need good roads. I know that this year, K5 billion has been given to each province for the road maintenance under the Rural Roads Unit.

You may wish to note that our provincial administration was kind enough to call for a consultative meeting for all hon. Members of Parliament from the Eastern  Province to discuss how we are going to use the K5 billion. After the discussions, it was agreed that the money would be shared equally among all the nineteen constituencies. However, to date, we have not received any feedback from the provincial administration as to what happened. We do not know which constituencies have benefited and how much money has been received out of the K5 billion or whether the whole amount was received. We want to know where the money is. To borrow Hon. Limata’s words, where is the money? Hon. Provincial Minister, as you come to respond, tell us whether you received the K5 billion. If you did, how many constituencies benefited from this K5 billion?

  We all know that this is a well-meaning Government because K5 billion was allocated to each province. This was a very brilliant idea. Therefore, I encourage the Government to keep doing this and make sure that all constituencies have equal amounts from this K5 billion for works to be carried out.

Thirdly, Mr Chairperson, I was looking at the Yellow Book and I saw that there was K29 million allocated for sensitisation of the border demarcations which took place in the Eastern Province. Two weeks ago, we had a very sad incident in my constituency where the game authorities from Malawi burnt thirty-five houses. This was because people encroached into Malawi. Due of this, people became insecure. They did not know what to do. We are very thankful that the security wings moved in quickly and assured people that all was well. However, I think this is because we have not done enough to sensitise our people living along the borders which we demarcated. They should know the new boundaries.

In Chipangali Constituency, there are areas we have gained from Malawi and we have lost land in some areas, but people do not know. There was K29 million allocated in the 2010 Budget, but nothing in the 2011 Budget. I think what happened two weeks ago, where Malawian authorities burnt thirty-five houses in Chipangali should be taken as a wake up call. We need money to sensitise people. Right now, people in Chipangali living along the border do not know where the border is and so they are not sure whether they should farm this time because they do not know whether Malawian authorities will come and slash their maize. Therefore, I urge the Government to provide money for border sensitisation because there is nothing this year in the Yellow Book.

The other issue is about the human-animal conflict in Mambwe District. Elephants attack human beings and eat whatever is grown in their fields and there is also a problem whereby people are attacking elephants. At the moment, in Mambwe District, game rangers shot someone who constructed a house purportedly in a game management area(GMA) and people are up in arms. They burned the Zambia Wildlife Authority (ZAWA) camp. Due to this, there is no ZAWA presence in this area because its officers afraid of the people who are up in arms. Therefore, I urge the Government to make sure this issue is addressed. I know that some politicians used this very much during their campaign in Mambwe and maybe when we look at the results that we got in Mambwe, they could have come out that way because of this issue. Let us find a lasting solution to this issue. Some politicians tend to abuse this issue of human-animal conflicts. I think we must be aware of this and find a solution before we go to next year’s elections. Let us resolve this issue in Mambwe District. People complain that elephants encroach in human resettlements and feast on what they are growing in their fields, but they have no right to attack the elephants because the law somehow does not favour them.

Mr Tembo: Even in Nyimba.

Mr V. Mwale: I understand that this problem is also in Nyimba because the hon. Member of that area has just confirmed that. Therefore, we must really find a lasting solution to this problem.

Mr Tembo: Hear, hear!

Mr V. Mwale: Lastly, we have talked so much about the climate change in this country and I think if there are awards to be given to some cities or towns for what they are doing about climate change. Chipata should be considered for such an award. The people in Chipata have stopped buying vehicles, but are instead purchasing bicycles. There are a lot of bicycle-taxis in Chipata. I think this is an environmentally friendly mode of transport.

Hon. Members: Hear, hear!

Mr V. Mwale: A lot of people, including civil servants, are using bicycle-taxis. They even formed a bicycle-taxi association, which has more than 200 members. I think this is a very good initiative for our climate. We keep talking about climate change without taking any tangible action. We need to take action now. We should stop burning gases and fuels which are destroying our planet. We should be innovative and use bicycles as alternative transport. Recently, there was a conference on climate change which was held in Copenhagen, Denmark in a bid to come up with solutions to the problem. I, therefore, urge the Government to give Chipata an award by turning it into a city.

I thank you, Sir.

Captain Moono (Chilanga): Mr Chairperson, thank you very much for this opportunity to contribute to the debate on the Floor of the House. Allow me to wish you and the whole House Merry Christmas and Happy New Year.

Mr Chairperson, I hope hon. Members have enjoyed themselves in Lusaka Province and I want to wish them a safe journey as they return to their constituencies. However, I want to caution them that the rain has just started and the roads are very slippery and, therefore, they must drive very carefully. We want to meet them again next Session.

Mr Chairperson, I want to first start by asking our hon. Provincial Deputy Minister to streamline the manner in which the grading of roads is done in Lusaka Province. I do not want to start pointing fingers because we are supposed to work together as a team to develop Lusaka Province. However, I have a few observations to make on road reconstruction in Lusaka Province. 

Mr Chairperson, it has become common in Lusaka Province for the graders to continuously be in Luangwa Constituency. By coincidence, that is where our hon. Deputy Provincial Minister stays. I think, next time, he should change that kind of scenario because he is supposed to be a hon. Deputy Provincial Minister for all of us. The releasing of funds for roads is not being done properly. Roads in Luangwa have been funded three times while those in Chongwe, Lusaka and Kafue have only been funded once and others have received nothing. If you look at the way money has been disbursed, he has enjoyed three consecutive releases. In Kafue, we only received money recently when we are already in the rainy season. So it is practically impossible to do a good job. We have about six graders and I thought it was going to be wise if these graders are given a timetable which all hon. Members will follow so that we know when these graders are coming to our constituencies.

Hon. Members: Hear, hear!{mospagebreak}

Captain Moono: We understand the terrain in our constituencies. We know the roads that need attention. Sir, I do not need to over emphasise this point because I have spoken to the hon. Minister in private and have agreed that we can tackle the problem of haphazard rehabilitation of our roads in Chilanga and other constituencies.

Mr Chairperson, let me restrict myself to Kafue and Chilanga. You are aware that the water we drink in Lusaka comes from the Kafue River. However, Kafue Constituency is one of the constituencies with an erratic water supply. I, therefore, think that we should join hands with the Provincial Minister and the hon. Member of Parliament for Kafue, who is also a Cabinet Minister, to see to the improvement of the water reticulation system for both Kafue and Chilanga.

Sir, clean water for our people is a right. It should not be a political issue. Politicians come and go, but some of the projects that we leave are for our children, grandchildren and great grandchildren.

Mr Chairperson, I also want to address myself to a problem that has become notorious, particularly in Chilanga Constituency. This is with regard to quarrying and mining.

Mr Chairperson, I support investment and think that every industry adds value to our economy. However, this should not be done at the expense of our citizens. We should ensure that industries such quarrying and mining are located in places where they will not disrupt the normal life of people.

Sir, Lusaka has a vast underlying stone which is good for quarrying. It is high time the Government took steps to put mining activities away from communities. A lot of houses are developing cracks as a result of the blasting that is taking place currently. Therefore, we need to work with the Provincial Minister and related ministries to ensure that we protect our people because these issues are close to the hearts of the people of Chilanga.

Mr Chairperson, a lot of people have complained about the lack of a proper drainage system. Let me inform you that the water from Kanyama Constituency proceeds to an area called Kalundu. As a result, we have lost a lot of lives in Kalundu to Cholera which breaks out every rainy season. It is important that the drainage system is extended to Kalundu area so that this water is channeled into safer areas and does not disrupt the normal life of our people.

Mr Chairperson, as regards the agriculture sector, I would like to encourage the hon. Minister of Agriculture and Co-operatives who I know is new in the ministry and is settling down.

Hon. Government Member: Very Mature!

Captain Moono: At the moment, we have a problem of the lack of D-compound. I have already talked to the hon. Minister and he has assured me that he will do something to correct the situation. Nonetheless, I appeal to him to ensure that in future, D-Compound is made available in time.

Mr Chairperson, there are two ways of farming. You can either plant with the D-Compound or apply your D-compound immediately after germination. However, the best method is the one where you plant with the D-Compound because as the seed germinates, it does so with nutrition and, therefore, grows faster than when you put your D-compound on the surface where you risk your fertiliser being washed away considering that D-Compound is not highly soluble.

Therefore, you should ensure that in future, the D-Compound is supplied in time so that farmers can follow the best method of farming.

Sir, the other issue I want to bring to your attention is the new game ranching ventures that are happening in the Lusaka Province. I have in mind Shantumbu where thousands and thousands of hectares have been given to a company to do game ranching.

I appreciate that this attracts tourists and earns us some revenue. However, animals should not be brought to the city. Some of the animals that are being introduced into the game parks are dangerous. I am referring to animals like elephants and buffaloes to mention, but a few. Very soon, we will end up with a buffalo on Cairo Road.

Mr Chairperson, the prime land near town should be left for human habitation. Animals should be further away from the city so that on weekends when we want to enjoy ourselves, we can drive to view them peacefully.

Mr Chairperson, another issue that I wish to bring to the hon. Deputy Minister’s attention is that of a clinic in Nakachenje Ward at PWD which was built by the community and electrified with the help of the Lion’s Club. What remains is the equipment and staff to start operating.

Mr Chairperson, it is very frustrating for our communities that when they construct a clinic, the Government does not move in quickly to provide the services.

Sir, in the same vein, I want to inform the hon. Minister that there is no health post in Nyemba Ward. It is high time we worked together to provide health facilities for such communities.

 Mr Chairperson, as regards the provision of education, Nyemba and Namalombwe Wards have no high school.  I think Chilanga is a very privileged area in that it is home to some hon. Ministers. They can bear me testimony that it is only children whose parents drive and have the financial capacity who are able to come to town and get the required education. However, the underprivileged children are not able to access education. They graduate in Grade 9 and I think this is not good in this time and era.

Mr Chairperson, finally, I want to encourage the hon. Ministers to develop the culture of touring Zambia so that they can be familiar with some of the things we are talking about. Some arguments that happen in this House would be unnecessary if the hon. Ministers toured the constituencies including those which do not belong to them.

When we say that the roads are impassable, we expect the hon. Ministers to know which ones we are talking about. In my constituency for instance, there is an area called Mpambamano which becomes impassable during the rainy season. I do not know whether it was by coincidence or by programme that I saw graders during the by-election. However, the day after the election, the graders were taken away.

Now that place has remained impassable because it is a muddy area. A lot of gravel needs to be poured into the area and compacted. These are issues that are very dear to the hearts of the farmers in these areas. Therefore, I am inviting the Provincial Minister to, one day, drive around Chilanga Constituency with me so that I show him the problem areas. This way, when we come here to discuss issues pertaining to the constituency, he will be aware of what is obtaining on the ground.

When I was young, I used to see politicians visiting villages. I saw the Mainza Chonas and Kebby Musokotwanes of this world touring the country and seeing for themselves the problems that people were facing. Nowadays, it is rare to see hon. Ministers touring ...

Interruptions

Captain Moono: Mr Chairperson, if my friends, hon. Government Members, were very effective on the ground, the composition of this Parliament would have been different. At one time, there were only ten Opposition hon. Members of Parliament, but the number is increasing because of their inefficiency.

I thank you, Sir.

Hon. Opposition Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Milupi (Luena): Mr Chairperson, I thank you for affording me the opportunity to contribute to the debate on the Floor of this House.

Sir, from the outset, let me state that this slot is availed to me on account of the Western Province. Therefore, in spite of my other responsibilities, I shall restrict myself to the …

Laughter

Mr Milupi: … issues affecting the Western Province.

Mr Chairperson, if one had a child who started off at a particular school and was close to being at the top of the class, but after a number of years, moved to the bottom of the class, the parents or relatives of that child would have a good reason to be concerned about the state of that school and so is it for the Western Province.

Sir, during the rule of the Movement for Multi-Party Democracy (MMD) Government from 1991, a province which was not the poorest now has the reputation of being the poorest. We can ask ourselves why the situation is like that now. As we come to the end of this twenty-year rule of the MMD, we need to really reflect on issues affecting the Western Province. Why has the province achieved this poorest status?

Mr Chairperson, the Budget we are debating is the responsibility of the Ministry of Finance and National Planning. However, it is not just the Ministry of Finance because its full title is Ministry of Finance and National Planning. I want to ask a question from its role as the ministry responsible for national planning. My understanding is that if you have, for example, a province or an aspect of whatever you are governing which is so poor, your planning entity will put in place plans that will uplift that particular institution. Therefore, I want to know from the hon. Minister of Finance and National Planning what plans have been put in place to ensure that the Western Province, which is now believed to be the poorest, also becomes like other provinces.

Sir, we are all aware that, even in this House, when any hon. Member is debating and he/she gropes around for a place that will illustrate the poorest place, I think all too often, the name Shang’ombo is mentioned.

Mr Lubinda: Yes!

Mr Milupi: Every time that someone wants to refer to a very poor place where there is no development, Shang’ombo is at the tip of their tongues. Those of us who come from that area have stopped being amused by its reference as the poorest place.

Mr Lubinda: Hear, hear!

Mr Milupi: What we need from that Government is a plan that will ensure that Shang’ombo and other places in the Western Province are no longer on the tips of people’s tongues who want to refer to poverty. We are one country.

Mr Chairperson, this plan that I am asking for from the Ministry of Finance and National Planning should indicate specific timeframes within which the province will be in tandem with other provinces.

Now, the 2011 Budget allocation for the Western Province is K35,755,938,936 billion which has been increased by K4 billion. This is grossly inadequate to address the issues of the poorest province to bring it to the levels of others.

Mr Lubinda: Hear, hear!

Mr Milupi: Mr Chairperson, K35. 7 billion is grossly inadequate. If this Government had specific plans, we would see some element of a Marshal Plan to uplift the standards of this particular place.

Mr Chairperson, let me refer to the utilisation of these resources. These meager resources must be used for intended purposes. However, what do we see in terms of our provincial administration? All too often, in the Auditor-General’s report, the Western Province comes out as one of those provinces where the utilisation of these public resources leaves much to be desired. All you need to do is to refer to the records of the Auditor-General’s reports that we have had in the past. This means that, instead of addressing their intended programmes, these little resources are filtered away or abused. What is your Government doing about that? I do not wish to refer to specific audit reports, but we are all aware about them.

In addition, many of our councils, which are supposed to be providing services at local level, are all marred in maladministration and abuse of public resources. As we speak, the Ministry of Local Government and Housing commissioned a disgraceful audit report on the Mongu Municipal Council. We wait to see what action the ministry is going to take to ensure that those that abuse public resources, which have been unearthed by your ministry, begin to respect public resources. Any action or inaction will further bolster those who think that resources at their disposal are available to them and their stomachs.

Mr Chairperson, let me also talk about the road infrastructure in the province. The sandy terrain of the Western Province needs hard surface roads much more than any other province. It is a kind of development that, if included in that Marshal Plan that I am talking about, can result in rapid and accelerated development in the province and uplift the standards of the people. This province is the one area where travel is so expensive because special 4-wheel drive vehicles have to be used when moving from one area to another. Those who want to keep the province down can continue to do so by neglecting resurfacing these roads.

Furthermore, we feel that the inter district roads will facilitate easy communication. In this respect, the Katunda/Lukulu Road, which has been on the drawing board for so many years, needs to be tarred. In addition to that, there is a shortcut from Mongu, specifically Limulunga, to Lukulu. This means that the two district headquarters, Mongu and Lukulu, are separated by 84 km. In order for this to be a reality, the Mongu/Limulunga/Mushitwambubu/Mbanga Road all the way to Lukulu District needs to be tarred. It must, therefore, be included in these plans.

Mr Chairperson, we are now coming to the end of this Tenth National Assembly and, every year, we have stood in this House to talk about these roads, but nothing has been done. I am specifically referring to the Kaoma/Luampa/Sichili/Sesheke Road. By the names that I have mentioned, I am sure you have seen so many constituencies that would benefit from this road.

I have travelled on that road several times. The distance from the Nakatindi Road to the Mongu/Lusaka Road is 300 km. This would cut out the communication difficulties between Kaoma and Sesheke.

Mr Mwangala: Hear, hear!

Mr Milupi: Mr Chairperson, Shang’ombo is always referred to as the poorest constituency. Therefore, we need a tarred road connecting it to Sesheke and Senanga …

Mr Mubika: Hear, hear!

Mr Milupi: …so that we can open up that place as referred to by the hon. Minister of Finance and National Planning. I have seen that some works have started on the famous Mongu/Kalabo Road, but let that not be used as bait on a hook. We have been waiting for this road and it should not end in Kalabo. It should go all the way to Sikongo. Even as we are entering the rainy season, we want machinery to shift to the other side where there will be no flooding, that is from Kalabo all the way to Sikongo. This is your test as a Government. If you can complete the works on that road so that it is a fully tarred road before 2011, you will stand a chance. If you cannot, there is no chance.

Interruptions

Mr Milupi: Mr Chairperson, this road is important because it is of national importance. The ultimate intention is that it should go all the way to the Atlantic Ocean so that there can be a shorter route to America, Europe and other places. Let us also look at the roads, specifically, within Luena. Before I go to Luena, let me talk about the roads in all districts and constituencies on the west bank of the Zambezi River. These have been neglected for a long time and as a result, life is extremely difficult for the people who live in this area. Something needs to be done about that and it should be part of the Government’s master plan.

Sir, in terms of schools, that province needs a lot more boarding schools because of the size of the province and the fact that it is very difficult to keep children travelling from far places. Even the colonialists had a number of boarding schools. What your Government has done is to reduce the number. Within Luena Constituency, there is only one high school which is at the corner of the constituency. What do we expect from people from far-flung places? You are denying them that which is their human right, which is education. We must re-plan and ensure that these schools that are being put up are not put up for political reasons, but to facilitate the proper education of our children. In this respect, schools such as Nangili and Nangula must be turned into boarding and high schools.

Mr Chairperson, let me talk about the canals in the Western Province. The place has low land and, therefore, it requires a lot of canals to drain the water so that farmers can use their land to grow food for themselves. After many years of probing this Government, a dredger has, at long last, been procured. I do not know where it is, but the hon. Minister of Communications and Transport did inform us that dredgers must start working immediately.

Sir, the first and most important area is to ensure that, even as we have the Kuomboka for 2011, we should make it even more spectacular by dredging that canal from Limulunga all the way to Lelui and widening the harbour area. We must also not forget that the ceremony is made spectacular by the waters that come from Makanda. Many of them are in Luena. So, we must widen those canals so that people can travel and be able to grow their foods.

Sir, there are certain issues that affect the lives of people. Earlier, I talked about cattle theft. What is your Government doing about that? During the time of the colonialists, the terms of people found wanting were specific. If you stole someone’s animal, you would be locked up for seven years. Therefore, people were afraid to involve themselves in cattle theft. Now, with the police and everybody else conniving, about a month ago, I lost two heads of animals from my kraal in my village. As a village headman, I must have cattle.

Laughter

Mr Milupi: What are you doing about that? What is your police doing about that? We are also talking about diseases. We must fight these.

Sir, a few days ago, I was in Kalabo and one issue that kept coming up was that of the ban on small species of fishes such as linembele and liminga. The people are still complaining about their ban. In spite of the fact that the hon. Minister of Livestock and Fisheries Development assured us that there was no ban on small species, we have people in Kalabo and Luena who have been banned from fishing this kind of fish on account of it being small, and yet we know that these never ever grow big. They also reproduce like other fish in their stature. Why are you doing this? Many people depend on trading this fish to make their livelihood. I was in a meeting where every person present was involved in that type of trade. If you do not know the species of fish that do not grow big, come and ask us and we shall let you know.

Mr Chairperson, lastly, as regards the Farmer Input Support Programme, with respect to the Western Province, inputs must be delivered on time. It is disgraceful that, at the end of November, fertiliser has not been delivered to certain places. Many of the areas in the Western Province get flooded and so, they have a very short growing period. In order for us to maximise that, we need that fertiliser at the beginning of the rainy season. However, you are failing because it is being delivered late.

Mr Chairperson, I thank you.

Mr Munaile (Malole): Mr Chairperson, from the outset, I would like to state that I support the Budget for the Northern Province. The last time I debated on the Floor of this House and as my voice reverberated, it raised some goose pimples because I talked about the issue of equitable distribution of resources.

Mr Chairperson, I will start from where I ended. Equitable distribution of financial resources is cardinal for the development of this country. The Northern Province, as you are aware, has twelve districts and if I was to make a break down of this, its Budget allocation, district by district, K3.8 billion has been allocated per district. That is the least funded province in this country. It will be very difficult for the people of the province to get the so much yearned for development.

Sir, it surprised me that some hon. Members of this august House made us believe that they positively engaged the Government so that their districts or constituencies could receive the development they wanted. This is because development is an agenda of the Government. Governments are put in place to deliver what the people expect of them. The MMD Government is the Government of the day and it should not expect everyone to sing a song of praise. Some of us tell this Government the truth because the Bible says, “Only the truth shall set you free.”

Hon. Opposition Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Munaile: Mr Chairperson, it is surprising that the hon. Members who attacked the MMD are now trying to make us believe that they are with the MMD. 

Mr Chairperson, ever since I came to Parliament, I have voted with the MMD on issues I have believed to be correct.

Hon. Opposition Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Munaile: I have also voted against the MMD when I have not agreed with their policies.

Mr Chairperson, we have been told that this House needs men and women of integrity.

Hon. Opposition Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Munaile: This House needs men and women who will speak the truth even in the midst of adversity. This House needs consistency in what we say and do. Only then will we be trusted as hon. Members of Parliament.

Sir, in trying to qualify the point of equitable distribution of resources, one MMD Member of Parliament, now in the Executive, challenged the former Minister of Finance and National Planning to resign if he did not equitably distribute resources in this country. It is in view of this background that I keep saying that unless money is distributed equitably, some areas of this country will lag behind.

Hon. Opposition Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Munaile: Hon. Milupi talked about the Western Province and how resources should be distributed. 

Mr Chairperson, we want the people on your right to realise that if they do not distribute resources equitably, some areas will lag behind and we do not want to go that route.

Permit me to talk about the Rural Roads Unit (RRU) that has been talked about extensively by my colleagues. When a figure of K6 billion is allocated to a province, it looks like a good thing. It will seem like there is equitable distribution of resources. However, if you break this amount down for constituencies, it is not enough. The Northern Province has twenty-one constituencies. If you distribute this amount to each and every one of them, they each get K285 million, and yet constituencies in Lusaka Province have been given K500 million each. Is this equal distribution of resources?

I am appealing to the hon. Minister of Finance and National Planning that if he has the chance to prepare the 2012 Budget, he should allocate money to constituencies and not provinces.

Hon. Opposition Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Munaile: If he will allocate K10,000 per constituency, so be it. They should take a leaf from the way the CDF is distributed.

Hon. Opposition Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Munaile: Mr Chairperson, I would like to talk about the road infrastructure in the Northern Province. As I said earlier, the Northern Province is the largest province, and yet over 1,000 km of our roads have not rehabilitated and are still gravel. If this province is to have paved roads, all the districts that are connected will need more money for road infrastructure.

The Kasama/Kaputa Road, through Mporokoso, is not repaired. Kasama and Mporokoso are two districts that are not connected. The Chinsali/Kasama Road, through Safwa, has not been worked on. The Kasama/Isoka Road has also not been rehabilitated. Likewise, the Mbala/ Nakonde Road, which becomes a death trap in the rainy season, has not been worked on. This is a road that is used by many people, especially traders. People travel 600 km from Nakonde to Kasama. How much money do they spend? It is also paramount that we look at the road between Kasama and Isoka through the Mbesuma Pontoon.

We have talked about the Mbesuma Bridge for a long time and every time such that it is like we are hitting a brick wall. This is a bridge that should have been constructed many years ago. People misappropriated money and have gone scot-free.

Mr Chairperson, when I talk about the Nseluka/Kyambi Road, I feel like a bird in the wilderness chirping. This is a road that has not been rehabilitated for the past twenty years. This is a very important road that leads to places where people live. I am appealing to this Government to look into this issue. When we speak, we do not want to bring you down, we want to make you realise that there is something wrong somewhere.

Mr Chairperson, the provincial administration should stop applying the Poverty Reduction Programmes (PRP) resources thinly. If we are to see development in the Northern Province, it will not help us to begin giving money in bits, for example, a K3 million for a project here and K2 million for another project there. We will not even see the impact of this money at the end of the day. Utilise the PRP resources for projects that will be meaningful and will make an impact on our people.

Mr Chairperson, I would like to talk about health in the Northern Province, specifically, Chilubi District, which has no hospital. If my memory serves me right, Mungwi and Chilubi were declared districts in 1997 but, to date, have no hospitals. Our people are still depending on rural health centres. I am appealing to this Government to do something about this.

In addition, most of our clinics and hospitals in the province do not have mattresses and linen. This Government must ensure that it provides what is required for our people. For instance, a clinic in Chifubwe, Malole Constituency was built, but has not been used for the past two years because this Government has not provided the equipment and other requirements. Should the people vandalise this clinic, you will be the first ones to complain. You should ensure that the clinic becomes operational so that our people benefit from its services.

Mr Chairperson, we have a health centre in Mungwi District in Malole Constituency. Unfortunately, there is no mortuary. The people have to travel 30 km to Kasama to take bodies to the morgue. When it is time to bury, they have to, again, travel those 30 km to pick up the body to bury it in Mungwi. Is this how it should be? Look into this matter so that our people can begin to see that they have a caring Government.

Mr Chairperson, in the 2011 Budget, K3 billion has been allocated for road rehabilitation, but hon. Minister, it is not stated which roads are to be rehabilitated. There is also an allocation for construction of culverts, but we do not know where. There is allocation for drilling boreholes, but we do not know where. I think that it is important that you tell us exactly where all this money will go to so that there is no suspicion. We need to know what will be done where and when. 

Mr Chairperson, in conclusion, I would like to state that only one person can lead at any given time. When one is given responsibility, one must accept that there will be criticism day in and day out. If you are not prepared to be criticised, do not take public office because people will always talk. The people on your left, Sir, will not sit on their laurels and watch. When you do not do the right thing, we will tell you. If you do not want to take what we are saying, it will be disastrous on your part. You have accepted responsibility. So, you should make sure that what we say is taken into account.

Mr Chairperson, personally, I am not here to simply talk about issues merely because I want to talk, but to tell you exactly what is happening and I will say nothing, but the truth. Therefore, if I tell you that there are no roads in Malole Constituency, I mean just that.

Hon. Government Members: Aah!

Mr Munaile: There is no road in Malole Constituency which you can talk about. If I tell you that the clinics in my constituency do not have mattresses, beds or blankets, I mean just that. If I say that Chilubi Island and Chilubi mainland need an embankment because it becomes very difficult for people from that area, I mean exactly that.

Ms Cifire: Ukazinyaya!

Laughter

Mr Munaile: Therefore, it is up to you to take what I say seriously or to leave it.

Sir, on a lighter note, as I conclude, I wish to say that since we are going into the festive season, I would like to wish all of you a Merry Christmas and a Prosperous New Year.

Mr Sikazwe: Hear, hear!

Mr Munaile: You can take it or leave it. It is up to you.

Laughter

Mr Munaile: I am just saying it and those who want to accept it, please do so and those who do not want, like Hon. Mbewe, are free to not to accept it. I know that we will meet, again, next year. May God bless you all.

   I thank you, Sir.

Mr Lubinda (Kabwata): Mr Chairperson, from the outset, let me join Hon. Jacob Chongo, on behalf of the hon. Members of Parliament from Lusaka Province and the people whom we represent, in congratulating Cardinal Merdado Mazombwe on his well-deserved appointment to the high office of Cardinal. We, the people of Lusaka, will gather at the Cathedral of the Child Jesus on the 4th December in thanksgiving for that honour on one of us. Let me, also, thank my two colleagues from Lusaka Province, Hon. Sylvia Masebo and Hon. Captain Cosmas Moono, who spoke on our behalf. I would now like to speak on behalf of the seven hon. Members of Parliament in Lusaka District. In addition to that, I will also comment on Kafue.

Sir, many who have spoken before me have lamented issues of the inadequate resource envelope. While I agree that the resource envelope is very important, I take a different view on the matter. It is not only the quantity or financial resources that are available which matter, but the process with which even the little is utilised.

As many people will know, Zambia is one of the few countries that have four different layers of Government as in Central Government, Provincial Government, district administration and finally, the local authorities. The office, position or level of provincial administration, as was defined by His Honour the Vice-President and Minister of Justice, has one very important role to play hence, the reason we still maintain it. That is the role of co-ordination. The provincial administration has to do with co-ordination. Had these administrations been functioning with regard to co-ordination, hon. Members of Parliament would have very little reason to keep running to line ministries. They would all be camping at the office of the provincial administrator who is the Provincial Minister.

The reason hon. Members of Parliament run to the hon. Minister of Works and Supply is that they have realised that the provincial administration has become irrelevant in as far as co-ordination is concerned. Therefore, I would like to appeal to my good hon. Minister for Lusaka, who is my fellow artist, to use his art of persuasion and co-ordination. Artists are always good at co-ordinating different functions like he co-ordinates the guitar when he is playing music. Please, hon. Minister for Lusaka Province, may you co-ordinate the functions of the line ministries in Lusaka and the other districts in Lusaka Province. We do not want you, hon. Minister, to become another implementing agency. Please, we would like you to co-ordinate programmes.

Mr Chairperson, in addition, the office of the provincial administration has the responsibility of supervising. Like Hon. Captain Moono said, we would like to see the provincial office take interest in the development work that is taking place in the province. It must supervise the Government programmes. That is its role. Finally, it must monitor and report back. That, I am afraid, is not happening. The provincial offices are not monitoring the Government projects. I would like to appeal to the hon. Minister in Lusaka to take note of that. You should co-ordinate, supervise and also monitor and report back too. How will you do that? Our proposals in Lusaka are that we have regular meetings.

Mr Chairperson, my colleagues in Lusaka mentioned that the first time that Hon. Shawa was hon. Minister for Lusaka Province, we had a series of meetings with him, but after going to the Northern Province and being brought back, those meetings seem to have remained in the Northern Province.

Mr Kasongo: He married a lot of women in the Northern Province.

Laughter

Mr Lubinda: What happened, hon. Minister? Can you arrange that we meet often so that we tell you the issues that are affecting the people in Lusaka? Besides that, can the provincial administration, particularly, the provincial local Government office also be seen to be alive? We would like to see the Provincial Local Government Officer going to Chongwe District when those people are having a council meeting so that he sits in as an ex-officio.

Mrs Masebo indicated assent.     

Mr Lubinda: We would like to see the Provincial Local Government Officer for Lusaka coming to Lusaka when we are having our council meetings. He should also go to Kafue when they are having their council meetings. Only then, can he or she claim to be Provincial Local Government Officer.

Mrs Masebo: Hear, hear!

Mr Lubinda: If you are going to be Provincial Local Government Officer and Provincial Ministers whose only job is to go to the airport, then you will become Airport Ministers and Airport Local Government officers.

 Hon. Opposition Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Lubinda: Please, come where your work is.

Mr Mbulakulima: Order!

Mr Lubinda took his seat.

The Deputy Chairperson: Order! I did not say anything.

Mr Lubinda: I am sorry, Sir. I thought I heard your nice voice saying, “Order!”

The Deputy Chairperson: No!

Mr Lubinda: I am sorry, Sir.

Laughter

Mr Lubinda: Sir, another matter that I would like to bring to the attention of the hon. Minister for Lusaka Province is that unlike what I heard from my princess yesterday when she talked about her participation in the District Development Co-ordinating Committees and, unlike what I heard from my colleague from the Northern Province, who quite often goes to Kasama to attend Provincial Development Co-ordinating Committee meetings, we, in Lusaka, do not even know when these District Development Co-ordinating Committee meetings are taking place. We also do not even know when the Provincial Development Co-ordinating Committee meetings are taking place. Can you link us with those other bodies so that we know what is happening? We need not sit in those meetings nor do we cry for a seat in those meetings. What we want is a programme because we want to know when the Provincial Development Co-ordinating Committee Meeting is taking place and what issues are to be discussed because we need to co-ordinate what they have agreed at provincial level with what is decided in our respective districts. That, I am sure, hon. Minister, is not too much to ask.

Sir, we are tired of the Lusaka City Council (LCC) being used and instructions being sent on a daily basis with respect to the management of the LCC. We would like you to co-ordinate the programmes in such a way that even the Ministry of Local Government and Housing must be aware of the fact that it is not the one that is running the LCC.

Mr Chairperson, the idea ...

The Deputy Chairperson: Order!

Business was suspended from 1255 hours to 1430 hours.
 

[THE CHAIRPERSON OF COMMITTEES in the Chair]

The Chairperson: Since there is no quorum, I suspended business for nine minutes.

Business was suspended from 1430 hours until 1439 hours.


[THE CHAIRPERSON OF COMMITTEES in the Chair]


The Chairperson: Before I call upon the hon. Member of Parliament for Kabwata, the Chair would like to register disappointment and displeasure at the Committee’s unprecedented failure to form a quorum for nine minutes. The whips must do their job to ensure that this House continues on the path it has always been all the time.

Mr Lubinda, you may continue debating.

Mr Lubinda: Madam Chairperson, in continuing with my contribution on the Vote for Lusaka Province, I would like reiterate the point that I made earlier this afternoon.

Dr Scott: Emphasise!

Mr Lubinda: The point was that the hon. Minister for Lusaka Province should call regular meetings with his fellow Members of Parliament so that they are informed of the programmes and projects that are implemented in the province.

  The lack of meetings is what is creating the suspicions that we have heard being registered by many hon. Members about having selective development and this is because hon. Members are not aware of the programmes that are being put in place by the Provincial Administration.
  
  Madam Chairperson, while I wish to commend the hon. Deputy Minister for doing commendable work on roads in Matero, because of lack of co-ordination between his office and the office of the hon. Member for Mandevu, she now thinks that she has been sidelined because there is no development taking place in her constituency. Some people may say that the roads in Mandevu are not being worked on due to lack of information.

Interruptions

Mr Lubinda: That would also be the case with regards to the issues raised by the hon. Member for Lusaka Central and the one for Kabwata. This is so because there is no co-ordination between the office of the hon. Minister of Lusaka Province and the various hon. Members of Parliament.

Madam Chairperson, I would like to present, on behalf the hon. Members from Lusaka District for the hon. Minister’s consideration, the priority projects that we would like him to address. The first one is the one I spoke about in the adjournment motion, the issue of drainage systems in the city. The hon. Minister must realise that when the Vice - President talks about how well he has relocated people, it reflects poorly on us hon. Members in Lusaka and also his office. It means that we have failed to avoid floods. So, the hon. Deputy Minister must take it upon himself to ensure that we open up drainage systems in the whole city to avoid flooding.

Madam Chairperson, the other issue is about the poverty levels in Lusaka and Hon. Moono touched on this matter. We are all excited about the social cash transfers that are taking place in various parts of the country. However, when will Lusaka’s turn come? It is not correct to assume that everybody who lives in the city is well-to-do. There are many poverty stricken people in the city of Lusaka. These are people who come from the rural areas thinking that they will find a better share of their cake in Lusaka and when they come here they find that there is no cake to be shared, not even bread crumbs. Those people, hon. Deputy Minister, also require to be provided for. Join us to lobby the Government for us in the Lusaka Province to also have a little bit of that cash transfer programme.

Madam Chairperson, another issue I want to discuss is that of our markets. The former President, Levy Patrick Mwanawasa spoke very clearly about the need to depoliticise markets. Can the hon. Minister for Lusaka Province join that clarion call to urge his colleagues in the Government to ensure that our markets are depoliticised. Lusaka is the capital city of the country. Why do you not lobby your colleague at the Ministry of Local Government and Housing to ensure that the market boards are established first here in Lusaka so that we remove cadres from our markets? We are fed up of having fights on partisan lines in our markets. Irrespective of which political party it is, we the hon. Members of Parliament in Lusaka, speaking on behalf of our constituents, want you to assist us in depoliticising all these markets.

Madam Chairperson, on the issue of markets, I would like to invite you to visit some of the markets in Lusaka. Visit Buseko Market and Tambalala Market in Matero for you to see the squalor in which people are buying their vegetables. Assist us to lobby for resources to be given to the LCC. Do not implement the projects yourself, but work with us in the council to ensure that we deliver development to our people.

Madam Chairperson, we are also concerned with the unplanned settlements. Lusaka has the largest number of unplanned settlements in the country…

Mr Shawa: On a point of order, Madam Chairperson.

Mr Lubinda: As hon. Deputy Minister of the province, you know very well that a few years ago, this Parliament allocated a colossal amount of money in the tune of K12 billion…

Mr Shawa: On a point of order, Madam Chairperson.

The Chairperson: Order! Although it is my opinion that the hon. Deputy Minister can respond to that as he comes to speak …

Mr Shawa: On a point of order, Madam Chairperson.

The Chairperson: A point of order is raised.

Mr Shawa: Madam Chairperson, it was not my intention to disturb my hon. Member of Parliament who is debating very well because I am getting his points. However, is he in order to forget that in this House, he has to address people through the Chair although he continues to talk to me? Is he in order Madam Chairperson?

The Chairperson: Definitely he is not in order. The hon. Member for Kabwata should speak through the Chair and he knows exactly how to address others through the Chair.

Mr Lubinda: Madam Chairperson, I just want to end by saying that can the hon. Minister for Lusaka Province ensure that he lobbies for the money that was meant for the upgrading of shanty compounds in Lusaka like Misisi which require the K12 billion which this Government to date has not been able to account for. Can the hon. Minister lead us in ensuring that we upgrade shanty compounds so as to uplift the standard of living of the people in Lusaka Province.

Finally, I would like to urge the hon. Minister to join us in encouraging the establishment of the Lusaka Game Park, the very first game park we are going to have in Lusaka. In so doing, let him work together with the hon. Minister of Environment,  Tourism and Natural Resources to ensure that the people who have invested their money on that piece of land for cropping this year are protected until the end of the season next year …

The Chairperson: Order! The hon. Member’s time has expired.

Mr Chota rose.

The Chairperson: Order! We have put a procedure for ourselves and for now I still need, if anybody, only from three provinces and Northern Province has adequately been covered.

The Deputy Minister for Northern Province (Mr Chinyanta): Madam Chairperson, I thank you for giving me this opportunity to express my sincere thanks to you for …

Interruptions

Mr Chinyanta: … to say…

The Chairperson: Order! Let us listen to the hon. Deputy Minister. Continue, please.

Mr Chinyanta: Madam Chairperson, I would like to say a few words on the Estimates of Revenue for Northern Province.

First of all, I would like to thank the hon. Members from the province who have debated on this vote. I wish to thank them for the contributions that they have made in implementing the budget for the province. I remain hopeful that we will continue working together as a team in 2011 and beyond.

Madam Chairperson, we, in the Northern Province, in terms of our mission, just like what His Honour the Vice President indicated endeavour to effectively promote the coordination and sustenance of development in our province. As a consequence, our goal is to ensure that we co-ordinate, harmonise and monitor all the projects in our province.

This calls for efforts from all the stakeholders in our province, including the hon. Members of Parliament, who have a duty to lobby for funds that are allocated in that province. This is to ensure that we follow up those funds so that development is taken to our province.

Madam Chairperson, we have been in this House now almost going to five years, four years and some months, and I am sure all of us now have gained enough experience to see how the Government can implement programmes in the provinces and how an hon. Member of Parliament can lobby for these projects. It is, therefore, my sincere appeal to our hon. Members on the need to be very active at all the stages of planning for these budgets, because we are very sure that when we are talking about the Yellow Book here, we are talking about things that have come from deep down the villages and townships culminating into what we are calling the Budget.

My appeal to them is not to be emotional, but alert at that stage so that the programmes and projects which they want to be implemented in the province are looked at and considered very well. It does not help us to come here and become very emotional and do all sorts of things …

Hon. Government Member: Hear, hear!

Mr Chinyanta: … instead of ensuring that we harmonise the programmes that we have in the province to ensure that we achieve one goal.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Chinyanta: Madam Chairperson, allow me to highlight just a few issues that arose during the implementation of the 2010 Budget in the Northern Province and, also, say something about what is earmarked for 2011. A number of roads under the Road Development Agency (RDA) and Rural Roads Unit (RRU) have been worked on in the Northern Province. I agree that we are still experiencing some challenges and it is good that some of the hon. Members from my province, who stood up, actually indicated how vast our province. In that light, the challenge of the work on the roads becomes very critical. The realisation, also, that we, as a Government, have created the RRU and bought equipment for it is very cardinal. However, the equipment will not work very effectively unless we, the people in the Northern Province, work together and ensure that we plan for the same roads.

 It is good that progress was made on some of the roads in our province. The work on the much talked about Kasama/Luwingu Road has reached a very advanced stage. However, it is very surprising that no one has talked about it, and yet the Government worked on it. On the contrary, people are now talking about other roads which will require the Government’s attention. That is good but we, as a Government, need to be praised where we have done very well.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!{mospagebreak}

Mr Chinyanta: This is because the need to have the Kasama/Luwingu Road worked on was a song in this House. It has now been done. I have taken note of some of the other roads that have been talked about, now, like the Mporokoso Road. As a Government, we will move towards that direction.

Madam Chairperson, the RRU has been talked about so much on the Floor of this House. It is true that, as a province, we have 7,600 Km of roads that are supposed to be worked on and this equipment has been divided among so many other areas that we need to work on as far as development is concerned in the province. Therefore, it calls for all of us, as I have indicated, to be level headed and ensure that we maximise the work that is going on in the province by ensuring that we plan properly.

 As a province, we planned, in 2010, to work on the roads in all the twelve districts in the Northern Province. The hon. Members of Parliament from the Northern Province requested the Government to work in the twenty-one constituencies in the province. That required us, as a Government, to ensure that the stakeholders, the chiefs and other people in the province, prioritised the same roads.

Madam Chairperson, that meant that our work in the Northern Province was delayed because of this request. We only started work in June, this year. This is something which is on the record and all our friends actually know about. So, I believe that as we talk about all these things, let us ensure that we co-operate what you are trying to do and what others are trying to do on the other side. It is not that we are trying to be political or anything. We are trying to provide leadership, also, in the provinces where we have been sent to work. However, it pays for people to come together and ensure that we work on the same roads.

Madam Chairperson, at the moment, out of twenty-one constituencies, only nine have been worked on. You can imagine the amount of work that remains to be done in the other constituencies.

Madam Chairperson, because of the pressure that we are getting regarding the works that we need to do in the province, we have now even become innovative to include the ZNS to come and help in this area. We are trying to allocate money to the DMMU to ensure that our roads are attended to. Therefore, when people say that we are doing nothing in this House, it is really very unfair. It is our plea that they understand what we are doing in the province.

Madam Chairperson, a total amount of 264 Kilometres have already been worked on in our province under the RRU. I can also mention briefly that other works have been done like, for example, culverts have been attended to where necessary. Of course, there are some areas where we still have problems.

Madam Chairperson, we have done some patching up on the Great North Road which has been talked about. The Government released K2.7 billion for that road and work has been done from Mpika to Nchito. Our hope is that we are going, now, to look at the other part from Mpika going to Nakonde.

Mr Chairperson, the Kasaba Bay Project is also another project which all of us, as Zambians, should be proud of. These are the areas where our attention has been shifted to ensure that we effectively do our job in that province.

Madam Chairperson, lastly, as regards the roads in the 2011 Budget, so that I move to other points, I must indicate that the Northern Province has been allocated a total of about K368.4 billion. If we look at the percentage, we have 12.8 per cent of the total amount of money in the roads sector. We are second to the Western Province which has 39 per cent. So, it surprises me to hear that we have been undermined as a province. The problem is that our friends are not checking records. They are not going to the right ministries to see, whether, as a province, we are disadvantaged.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Chinyanta: Madam Chairperson, if one looked at the percentages, they would discover that other provinces were allocated even lower amounts of money. So, it surprises me to hear the kind of debate that alleges that we, as a province, are not getting a good share of the national cake. Our hope is that we utilise that money properly, I agree, because that will help us to ensure that we move forward.

Madam Chairperson, at the same time, I have noticed that a number of questions which are being asked on the Floor of this House are based on activities with provisions in the Budget. This is another indication that, maybe, our friends are not reading or checking what is in the Yellow Book.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Chinyanta: Madam Chairperson, there are provisions for the Mbesuma Bridge in the Budget, and yet someone is asking me where the money for this bridge will come from? K1 billion has been provided for the Luena Bridge. So somebody cannot come here and ask me questions about that. If an hon. Member of Parliament asked me a question about that, it would either mean that he/she does not go to his/her constituency or is not in touch with what is happening on the ground.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Chinyanta: As a result, you start shifting the blame and throwing arrows at people who are trying to help you do your work in your province.

Madam Chairperson, money has been provided for the Kasama/Mbesuma Road and D 18. The problem is that, maybe, our friends do not know where to ask about these things. It is a well-known fact that the Government, as it sends money to the provinces. The money comes through ministries. That is the money which people need to know about and follow up and ensure that works on roads is done.

Madam Chairperson, the picture I have painted is the same in the other Government ministries. So much is being done, and for example, under the Ministry of Health, a good number of district hospitals are being built there. Of course, there are challenges. However, the challenge of putting adequate staff to man these hospitals is what we are addressing as a province.

Madam Chairperson, the Ministry of Education has built new high schools in the province.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Chinyanta: These are the things which people, themselves, are seeing in the provinces. I believe that the people, themselves, will judge us correctly because they are seeing the help that this Government is sending to them.

Madam Chairperson, for 2011, the proposed budget for Northern Province is K45,657,610.94. Out of these funds, our expectation is that we are going to send money to rehabilitate canals, feeder roads, under the RRU, to do some works in livestock and development, we expect to do a lot in infrastructure development in the districts and communities and also provide some money for empowerment funds to our youths and women. Apart from that we also need to provide school desks and solar panels to some of our school buildings in the province.

Madam Chairperson, I was asked where the money under PRP had gone. It has been ensured that this money has been sent to the provinces. Therefore, hon. Members should liaise with us so that programmes in their areas are prioritised and implemented. However, if they stay aloof and do not want to co-operate with the provincial leadership, their areas will be left out. It is our duty to provide leadership in the provinces and, therefore, we are going to ensure that we ask all stakeholders to help us to ensure that we take development to all areas. This is very important and it is the only way we can become very effective in terms of the co-ordination hon. Members talked about.

Of course, we have fallen short in some areas, but we will try as much possible to overcome these shortcomings. We will do everything possible to make sure that we effectively keep in touch with hon. Members of Parliament. We are trying to do our best, not only in the Northern Province, but also the entire country and people are seeing these efforts.

Madam Chairperson, the development activities I have just outlined above are provincial priorities. The provincial budget focuses on projects, programmes and activities aimed at reducing poverty among our people. As a tradition, some projects and programmes for the province are reflected in other ministries, as I have indicated. It is our hope that the funds for the approved projects, programmes and activities will be released with minimum delay. I also wish to state that the province is in dire need of resources that can match its size, if any meaningful development is to take place. It is now my wish and earnest appeal that hon. Members of Parliament from the Northern Province and other parts of the country will support our estimates of expenditure for the Northern Province.

I thank you.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

The Deputy Minister for Copperbelt Province (Mr Mbulakulima): Madam Chairperson, I thank you for giving me this opportunity to respond to some comments made by hon. Members and also state the developmental status of the Copperbelt Province.

Hon. Government Members: Hammer, hon. Minister!

Mr Mbulakulima: Madam Chairperson, I have been told to hammer, but …

The Chairperson: Order!

There is no hammering in here. Just speak.

Laughter

Mr Mbulakulima: However, as a senior provincial hon. Deputy Minister, I need to state facts as they are. The Copperbelt Province stands for equitable distribution of resources. We will not discriminate against anyone and this we have demonstrated. There has been unprecedented economic growth on the Copperbelt and there is no dispute about this.

Madam Chairperson, despite the global economic meltdown that we experienced, this Government has remained resolute in keeping the mining sector buoyant. The mines are working and operating effectively. Apart from that, new mines have been opened, which we refer to as green fields. This is something that was not there before. Jobs have also been created. In short, we can state that dignity has been restored to the people of the Copperbelt. Luanshya miners are a typical example of how dignity for mankind can be restored. I am also aware that, apart from the mining sector, a lot of companies across the province are doing extremely well, especially those which thrive on the mining sector.

Madam Chairperson, agriculture is another sector in which the province is doing extremely well. One of our visions is to diversify the economy of the Copperbelt. In this regard, I am glad that the province has been rated about fourth or fifth out of nine provinces in the country in terms of agriculture production. For the benefit of most of those who might bemoan the lack of land in the province, I want to report that we have actually created about 100 hectares of farming land in Lufwanyama. His royal Highness, Chief Shibuchinga, has given us land and, as a province, we want to boost agriculture on the Copperbelt. The manufacturing and construction sectors have done extremely well. Schools, clinics and rural health centres are now allover.

Madam Chairperson, as a way of addressing some concerns by hon. Members, allow me to respond as follows. I want to thank Hon. Kankasa for her sober debate.

The Chairperson: Order!

Mr Mbulakulima: Sorry, it was Hon. Kawandami.

Laughter

Mr Mbulakulima: I want to thank her for her sober debate although she is not here. Nonetheless, I know that she is listening wherever she is. I agree with her that working together should be the way forward. As leaders, we are there to bring development and I want to state, as earlier stated, that my administration will never discriminate against anyone and we will welcome everyone.

However, I do not agree with Hon. Kawandami that there is no development taking place in Ndola. I want to believe that Ndola has retained its status as the second biggest city in this country. I believe the hon. Member is a veteran of Ndola and will recall that the last time we experienced any construction in Ndola was back in 1994, when we saw the Mukuba flats and, indeed, the extension of the Premium Plaza. From that time, we never experienced any construction in Ndola until in the recent past.

In her constituency alone, there are so many houses for the police. For the first time, police houses have been constructed in Kansenshi, Peter Singogo, Lubuto and many other places. If anything, the problem that we have now is that we have got too many houses for police officers. This never used to be the case. I do not want to talk about the sports stadium being constructed because it is there for everyone to see, but besides that, Ndola is earmarked for unprecedented economic growth.

Madam Chairperson, the problem that we might have is that some people want old companies like Refined Oil Products (ROP), Colgate Palmolive and Dunlop to return to Ndola. However, we should not forget that where we used to have Dunlop, today, stands a monumental building by Pick ‘n’ Pay Supermarket. Today, in Ndola, we have seen companies like Zambezi Portland Cement and a transformer company by the Zambia Electricity Supply Corporation (ZESCO) emerge. Even in the private sector, it is only now that we can see Rekays and  Zmart expanding. Anyone who comes to Ndola will agree that Ndola is really on the move in terms development. I, therefore, do not agree with somebody who comes and says that there is nothing happening in Ndola.

I agree with Hon. Mukanga’s sentiments. I saw that he had a lot of insinuations, but I believe because of his level of education, he was able to mix tact with diplomacy and persuasion. I share his opinion that there are a lot of things that need to be done, especially in the road sector. I want to report that we have also recognised that the Sabina/Mufulira Road is in a poor state, but this Government has earmarked billions of Kwacha for that road.

Sir, I also want to report, further, that Mopani Copper Mine has agreed to start mending potholes, by next week, while we await the full rehabilitation of this road. I also want to report that the Road Development Agency (RDA) will work on the road between Mufulira and Mokambo. I admit that is there is one district where we have never been, in terms of rural road maintenance, which is Mufulira. For this reason, we have agreed that Mufulira is next on the list of rural roads reconstruction.

Madam Chairperson, the other hon. Member whom I want to respond to is Hon. Kambwili and I believe most of the things he said are unfounded.

Mr Kambwili: Question!

Mr Mbulakulima: I believe that this Government appreciates the role of the Opposition. However, as I have stated on the Floor of this House from the time I gave my maiden speech, ours is not a shared mandate. My administration is not a shared one and, therefore, I will not allow any interference.

     What I have stated on the Floor of this House in my maiden speech is that my administration is not a shared mandate. Therefore, I will not allow any interference, but dialogue. However, if somebody wants to use force in my administration, I will not allow this canon to disturb the peace that we are enjoying.

I promise that I will uphold the integrity of my administration, but discipline is important.

Interruptions

The Chairperson: Order!

Mr Mbulakulima: I do not agree to the issues raised by our colleagues that we have made ourselves unpopular by not sending the RRU equipment because those are some of the tactics that they use. If it will make us unpopular, why then do you want to force us because we know what we are doing? We believe that these are some of the issues that you want to take advantage of just like the CDF. Therefore, we have a lot of challenges.

The other point is on the complaints arising from Hon. Kambwili which I believe are misdirected. He talked about the land which was degazetted in Chambishi. The MFEZ is not only for the Chinese, but everybody, including Zambians. That land is not for the Chinese, but for us. Most of them have complained that US$500 that is pegged to it is too much. These are the same people who are asking to run the mines and how do you reconcile the two? If that land was given to party cadres, I would agree that it would be a misuse of land.

Mr Chairperson, you know that there are two types of land, customary and State land. Is it not a prudent way of utilising State land to put up an MFEZ? In my opinion, that is a proper way of utilising land.

The other point he mentioned that the Ndola Stadium has been built on gazzeted land is true. However, we have to bear in mind that it is a national stadium. It does not belong to Ndola District alone and if it was given to the Ndola MMD District officials, then we would have said, yes, what the hon. Member said makes sense. These are some of the issues that make us differ with our colleagues.

I have listened to the debates from our colleagues from Southern, Central and Western provinces and they were well balanced. For instance, the debate by Hon. Imbwae - if you had people like her in your province, you would feel encouraged to listen to her debates. As Provincial Deputy Minister, you would feel that you have consultants in your province. However, I will not allow somebody who brings tear gas in my office.

Laughter

Mr Mbulakulima: For me, I was trained at the Zambia National Service in how to handle a loose canon. I will not allow lumpen proletariats to dictate things to me. I want to use brains when we are working.

Madam Chairperson, Hon. Kambwili talked of the miners in Luanshya being under paid. We have stated on the Floor of this House that the minimum pay for the workers at Luanshya is K1.3 million and now, they go to Chambishi and say they are underpaid. That is not allowed.

Hon. Kambwili incited the miners to go on strike and demonstrate on Monday. Luckily, the hon. Deputy Minister of Labour and Social Security addressed the workers. Currently, the workers in Luanshya are satisfied and happy.

Interruptions

Mr Mbulakulima: Madam Chairperson, the Government is working. I would like to offer free advice because one cannot be a Jack of all trades. Every topic that comes, you are on it. During Questions for Oral Answer, you are the first to ask questions.

Mr Kambwili: Efyo twaishila kuno!

Mr Mbulakulima: I am …

The Chairperson: Order!

I think the Chair controls the debates in the House. The hon. Minister may be on his own path of what he wants to debate because the control is from the Chair.

The hon. Minister may continue.

Mr Mbulakulima: Madam Chairperson, we are human beings and have feelings. If you want to get something constructive, but you do not agree with me, then follow what the man of the moment does in this House. The humble people of Namwala have managed to get what they want because they know how to engage the Government.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Mbulakulima: For me, it is not the height, the size of the chest or tummy, but the reasoning that matters.

Laughter

Mr Mbulakulima: Madam Chairperson, as a Government, we are determined to work on all the roads that are earmarked for reconstruction. I am glad that the entire Chingola Road infrastructure, for example, is under reconstruction. The road infrastructure for the entire cities of Kitwe and Ndola are all under reconstruction. This Government has done what is humanly possible to do. It is for this reason that, today, I stand proud on the Floor of this House to ask this noble House to approve the 2011 Budget so that we can forge forward and bring prosperity to the people of the Copperbelt.

Madam Chairperson, I thank you.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

The Chairperson: Order!

I would like to give a piece of advice, probably not for the first time. The Members on my right are advised to speak from their written scripts. It has nothing to do with the failure by a Member to speak. It is a requirement for the purpose of your own control to remain within your own policies. Therefore, I urge the hon. Members on my right to try to speak based on your written scripts as much as possible.

The Deputy Minister for Lusaka Province (Mr Shawa): Madam Speaker, I would like to thank you most sincerely for having given me this chance to say something on the Lusaka Province Vote.

In the first place, I wish to pay glowing tribute to His Honour the Vice-President and Leader of Government Business in the House for having ably presented the policy statement on behalf of all provincial offices.

Madam Chairperson, I wish to thank all hon. Members of Parliament who have debated positively on this Motion on the Floor. In particular, I thank Hon. Masebo who, unfortunately, is not in the House. I welcome Hon. Captain Moono into the House and, indeed, to Lusaka Province and Hon. Lubinda who was my dancer when I used to play the guitar.

Laughter

Mr Shawa: I would like to thank these people who have contributed on behalf of Lusaka. I, also, would like to thank my staff at the Lusaka Provincial Administration for their support under very difficult circumstances.

Madam Chairperson, I have noted that the debates, generally, have been on roads, especially the RRU. I want to say that the challenge we had in Lusaka Province was that up to October, 2010, out of the K5 billion which we were supposed to get, we had only received K1.8 billion. However, I wish to state that we have used this money very effectively and efficiently. Yes, we might be blamed that there was concentration on Luangwa, but it is because Luangwa is the most impoverished district in my province. You will not see any tarmac in that area, therefore, we are trying as much as possible to see to it that we help those people.

  However, suffice to say that Hon. Lubinda said there is no development that has taken place in Lusaka Province. An amount of K199 billion was recently released and I made an announcement that all hon. Members in Lusaka Province should take their priority lists to the office because Lusaka Province has to make sure that 30 km of roads in each constituency is worked on. Unfortunately, the only Member of Parliament who brought the list of roads to be worked on very late in his constituency is hon. Member for Kabwata, who is very talkative.

Laughter

Mr Shawa: Madam Chairperson, at the moment, we have already worked on the 30 km of roads in Matero, Kanyama and Chawama constituencies and I thank them for having kept us busy at the office. At the moment, the graders are in Mandevu and Munali constituencies and, soon, work will start in these constituencies. The hon. Member for Kabwata, who is a political Vuvuzela in Lusaka, Madam Chairperson, ...

Laughter

The Chairperson: Order! Order!

Vuvuzela may be found in the latest editions of the dictionary, but I think we should use words sparingly in this Assembly because this is basically Parliament. This comes from the word, “parlez” in French, which means to speak or talk. Thus, talking is the role of this House and, therefore, if the word “Vuvuzela” is a positive word, then that is alright. However, there is a feeling that a Vuvuzela makes some noise that can be disturbing to others.

Laughter

The Chairperson: Here, people speak. There is no Vuvuzelaling for now.

The hon. Deputy Minister of Lusaka Province may continue.

Mr Shawa: Thank you, Madam Chairperson. It is a pity that we cannot argue with you ...

Laughter

The Chairperson: Order! Order!

Mr Shawa: ...but in music, that ...

The Chairperson: Order! Order!

The hon. Deputy Minister for Lusaka Province is already arguing by making that statement. Please, remind and warn yourself not to argue. You have a very serious statement to make. Can you go on without provoking the Chair any further?

You may continue.

Mr Shawa: Thank you very much, Madam Chairperson, for the quidance.

Let me state that under the Road Development Agency (RDA), there was a lot of work in Kabwata Constituency. There was a lot of rehabilitation and upgrading of approximately 25 km. About 15.4 km of the Kasama Road, 1.8 km of the Yotam Muleya/Libala Water Works and 2.2 km of the Break Point/Kamwala South roads were rehabilitated in Kabwata Constituency using K34 billion.

I took note of all the concerns of the hon. Members.

Madam, I would like to thank the hon. Minister of Health who eloquently elaborated the works that have been undertaken in Lusaka in terms of health. At the moment, Kafue District has a district hospital and Chongwe has district hospital which is at level two. The construction of a hospital has started in Luangwa District. In Lusaka, the provincial hospital is almost reaching completion stage, unless you have no eyes to see. Five other clinics have been upgraded to hospital level in Lusaka. Some of these Under-Five clinics at Chawama are being used by some people.

Laughter

Mr Shawa: That is very good.

In sports, Madam Chairperson, there is a Centre of Excellence for Sports in Lusaka and people do not want to talk about this.

In education, a lot has been done. There are many secondary and basic schools which have been upgraded. The able hon. Minister of Education has done a wonderful job. She tabulated everything that has been done in Lusaka Province.

On the issue of agriculture, Madam Chairperson, I would like to thank the people of Lusaka, Chongwe and Kafue who have contributed immensely to the food basket of this country, in particular, the bumper harvest that everybody is talking about. I would like to appeal to my colleagues, the hon. Members from Lusaka Province that they should come to our offices when they are called upon to do so. It is not good to refuse to see the Minister. Do not be proud. It is better to understand that we are all representing and serving the people. We have done quite a lot in Lusaka and my Government will continue to work hard so that we ameliorate the sufferings of our people in Lusaka Province. We want development to be taken holistically to all the people.

Mr Chairperson, the Government wants to empower the youths and women. Let me thank the hon. Minister of Community Development and Social Services, Mr Kaingu, and the hon. Minister of Sports, Youth and Child Development, Mr Chipungu, for what they are doing. I would also like to thank all the hon. Ministers for their support to my province.

With these few remarks, I appeal to hon. Members to support this Vote and wish everyone a Happy Christmas and a Prosperous New Year.

I thank you, Madam.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

The Deputy Minister for Southern Province (Mr Muchima):  Madam Chairperson, thank you for giving me this opportunity to contribute to the debate on this Vote.

Madam Chairperson, I wish to thank all hon. Members from the Southern Province for welcoming me to that province. Once more, I would like to thank the old man, the hon. Deputy Minister in the Vice-President’s Office, Hon. Munkombwe, for his continued support to my administration.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Muchima: Madam Chairperson, the Southern Province has wonderful people contrary to what is portrayed by other colleagues that the Tonga and Ila people are difficult. We are there for good administration. The Government will ensure that there is effective and efficient co-ordination for all the activities. This Government shall not segregate because it wants to deliver development to the Southern Province.

In the Southern Province, Madam, the MMD Government has addressed the critical issues. The Zimba/Livingstone, Batoka/Maamba and Choma/Namwala roads have been rehabilitated and these are the Government’s heavy investments in the social sector.

During my few days as Deputy Minister for the Southern Province, I have toured the province and seen tremendous growth illustrated by money being in the hands of the people.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Muchima: There are, at the moment, not only bicycles, but motor vehicles as well. There are Fuso and Canter trucks bought by teachers, nurses and so on. I have been to most villages in the Southern Province and I have seen that the people of this province are hardworking and responding to development positively.

On the issue of the Food Reserve Agency (FRA), this Government has done very well in terms of collecting the maize and paying the people. Within the next two weeks, everyone in the Southern Province will have been paid.

 The Government has so far bought about 3, 672,104 x 50 bags of maize. The grassroots in the Southern Province appreciate the Government.

Hon. Opposition Member: They want money in the pocket.

Mr Muchima: We are determined to deliver more and we have been there for their cause.

Madam Chairperson, as regards the defects on the Batoka/Maamba Road which was constructed recently, I have to tell the House that the Government is using the Office of the Vice- President to attend to the bad road and bridges.

Recently, the hon. Member of Parliament for Sinazongwe went to inspect the bridges in his constituency. The Government is well informed to that effect.

Madam, I am sure that everyone is aware that during the Budget Speech, it was indicated that works on the long awaited Kazungula Bridge would start in 2011.

Madam Chairperson, we have done very well with regard to the provision of health. Kalomo has a hospital which has been completed and is just awaiting opening.

Lieutenant-General Shikapwasha: Hear, hear!

Mr Muchima: Madam Chairperson, Choma and Siavonga are also beneficiaries of hospitals.

Madam Chairperson using our co-operating partners, we will soon have a school that will cost K9 billion.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Muchima: Madam Chairperson, there will be rehabilitation works in Itezhi-tezhi that will cost billions of Kwacha . This will mean creation of employment for our people. The Southern Province is the centre for employment.

Lieutenant-General Shikapwasha: Hear, hear!

Mr Muchima: There are mines that have employed a lot of people and, as you are aware, most of our electricity is generated from the Southern Province.

Madam Chairperson, I was surprised to hear Hon. Muntanga appreciate Hon. Munkombwe the other day when he was in the forefront of fighting this old man who has so much wisdom. Now that he is no longer Deputy Minister for the Southern Province, he finds him useful.  Whatever the case, to us this side, Hon. Munkombwe is still very useful and that is why we will continue to consult him.

Hon. Government Member: Hear, hear!

Mr Muchima: Madam Chairperson, the Government has constructed six basic and five high schools in the districts, except Livingstone. However, Livingstone also had its own share in other areas such as the rehabilitation of the Livingstone General Hospital, the construction of houses for the police and a project for the army.

Madam Chairperson, the Government has included the Southern Province in its development agenda in totality. There is more development in the Southern Province than there is in the North-Western Province where the money is coming from.

Hon. Opposition Member: Aah!

Mr Muchima: Mr Speaker, we need the support of everyone in this Budget. Hon. Muntanga is a great beneficiary of this Government as he was our provincial treasurer in the MMD. He is just on recess in the UPND.

Laughter

Mr Muchima: He is equally lost.

Hon. Government Member: Hear, hear!

Mr Muchima: Madam Chairperson, the construction of the Chikanta Bridge is underway and the most talked about Bottom Road has been provided for in the Budget.

Madam Chairperson, the major problems in the Southern Province are water and livestock diseases. These have been addressed in the 2011 Budget.

We shall visit every corner of the province to ensure development. Since the main roads have been worked on, our main task is to collaborate with my colleagues so that we can deal with the feeder roads. The equipment is being serviced and we intend to acquire more equipment locally. We shall attend to most of the roads that you are talking about.

 I know about the road problems in Dundumwezi. There is a high rate of maize production and cattle rearing. This is a very economic province that requires your support. I sincerely thank all of you, my colleagues, for welcoming me to the province.

 I thank you, Madam.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

The Deputy Minister for Luapula Province (Dr Kawimbe): Mr Chairperson, I thank you for the opportunity to debate the estimates for Luapula Province.

From the outset, let me state that as the head of the provincial administration in the Luapula Province, I am ultimately responsible for the actions of all public servants charged with the responsibility of serving our people in the province. The buck stops at me, as the Americans would say.

I, therefore, assume full responsibility for what has worked well and what has not worked well in Luapula Province. In one of our local languages, there is a saying that goes, “Apakomaila nondo ninshi pali ubulema”, meaning that were the blacksmith’s hammer hits repeatedly, that is where the problem is.

Several hon. Members have passionately debated the issue of rural roads rehabilitation. This is an indication that rural roads rehabilitation continues to be a major challenge in our country.

Madam Chairperson, as a medical doctor, I am acutely aware of the danger of treating symptoms instead of treating the underlying disease. For instance, in a patient suffering from malaria, Panadol will bring down the fever and lessen the headache, but will not cure the malaria until the patient is given the Artenam, Fancidar or Quinine.

Hon. Member: Ema doctor aya!

Dr Kawimbe: With regard to the challenges that we face in the rural road sector, during my debate, I want to humbly submit that changing the faces of politicians and civil servants at the provincial administration level, as suggested by some hon. Members, may not necessarily cure all the ills that we face in the rural road sector.

Mr Chairperson, a review of the rural road sector is a good beginning point in trying to establish what the underlying problems in the road sector may be.

Mr Chairperson, when the British ruled this country, the vast majority of our roads were gravel and unpaved, but were well maintained. The British used a decentralised system where roads camps were set up every so many miles and equipped with two graders, a tipper and a tractor. In between the road camps were sub road camps which were equipped with a tractor and grader. Each road camp was responsible for the maintenance of its portion of the road.

Mr Chairperson, during the First Republic, from 1964 to 1972, the colonial system of road maintenance was maintained. In addition, some of the inter-provincial roads were paved or tarred. 

Mr Chairperson, the Second Republic, from 1973 to 1990 saw the beginning of the decline of the Zambian economy. The colonial system of maintaining rural roads using road camps continued to operate, but did not escape the negative impact of the economic decline the country was going through.

Mr Chairperson, when the MMD came into power in 1991, our ability to impact on the road network was very limited given the poor state of the economy that we inherited. In 1966, the donors came in to support the road sector under the following conditions:

 (i) there should be no more force accounting. Force accounting is when the Government uses its own workforce and equipment to undertake road works;

 (ii) all roads would have to be contracted to private contractors; and

 (iii) on their part, the donors promised to train the small-scale contractors and provide them with loans to buy the necessary equipment.

As a result,

 (i) the Roads Training School was closed and its assets handed over to the National Council for Construction;

 (ii) most of the skilled manpower of the Roads Department was retrenched on voluntary separation, leaving the Roads Department with a skeleton staff to manage the contracting out of road works; and

 (iii) some of the equipment that belonged to the Roads Department was handed over to district councils while the rest went to the RDA. Eventually, the vast majority of the equipment ended up being sold.

Madam Chairperson, unfortunately, the donors did not keep their side of the bargain. The promised training of the small-scale contractors never materialised and neither did the loans for earth-moving equipment. As a result, the country experienced shoddy works by our road contractors.

Sir, it is against this background that former President Dr Chiluba went back to force accounting using the Government’s manpower and equipment to work on our rural roads. Dr Chiluba ordered earth-moving equipment from China and placed it under the custody of the Zambia National Service (ZNS).

Madam Chairperson, hon. Members will recall that in 2002, this august House passed the Public Roads Act which established the RDA, the National Road Fund Agency (NRFA) and the Road Transport and Safety Agency (RTSA).

The implementation of the Public Roads Act commenced on 1st January, 2005 with the appointment of the boards. As indicated earlier, the abandonment of force accounting and adoption of private contractors to work on feeder roads proved to be expensive and poor value for money because of substandard road workmanship.

Madam Chairperson, this is what prompted late President Levy Patrick Mwanawasa, SC. to go back to force accounting as a way of maintaining our rural roads in 2006. The donors opposed the resurrection of the Roads Department and threatened to withdraw funding from the road sector.

Finally, a compromise was struck by adopting the creation of a unit rather than a department within the Ministry of Works and Supply. This is how the RRU came into existence. In 2007, late President Mwanawasa, SC. ordered 207 pieces of earth-moving equipment from the People’s Republic of China at a cost of US$39 million which arrived in the country just before the onset of the rains in 2008.

Madam Chairperson, I took over as Provincial Deputy Minister for Luapula Province on 1st January, 2009. The three major roads that link Luapula Province to the rest of the country, Pedicle, Tuta and Mansa/Luwingu were in a deplorable state. The Pedicle Road was virtually impassable during the rainy season unless one had a four wheel drive vehicle. The Mansa/Luwingu Road was so bad that it was faster to walk than drive the distance. The Tuta Road, all the way from the Serenje Turn Off to Mansa, was riddled with hundreds of potholes.

To add insult to the injury, the main road within the province that connects five of our seven districts in the province, Mansa/Kashikishi, was equally riddled with hundreds of potholes. Needless to say that the rural roads were equally in a very bad state of repair. To make things even worse, the Pedicle Road was not budgeted for in the 2009 Budget. The Mansa/Kashikishi Road was also not budgeted for in 2009. Neither was the Mansa/Luwingu Road budgeted for. The only road that was budgeted for was the Tuta Road.

Madam Chairperson, as a provincial administration, we get authority from the Treasury and ministries of Works and Supply and Finance and National Planning to use the K2 billion allocated to the RRU to rehabilitate the Pedicle, Mansa/Luwingu and Mansa/Kashikishi roads because it would have not made must sense to rehabilitate the feeder roads when the main roads into which the feeder roads drain are virtually impassable.

Madam Chairperson, in 2010, Luapula Province lost a total of K100 billion worth of road works as result of the stand-off between the donors and our Government. It was against this background that, once again, authority was obtained from the Treasury, ministries of Works and Supply and Finance and National Planning to vary the 2010 work plan so that the RRU could carry out essential repairs on some of these very important roads.

Madam Chairperson, from 22nd May to 12th June, 2010, I conducted a marathon tour of Luapula Province, visiting our people in every one of the seven districts and three roads emerged as the worst roads in the province. These are:

(i) Chembe/Chipete Road which was last worked on thirty-one years ago;

(ii) Lambwe/Chomba Road which was so bad that the Government officials from Chienge District had to detour through the Northern Province via Kaputa Boma to reach Lambwe/Chomba; and

(iii) Chisembe/Chibote Road which leads to one of the most agriculturally productive areas in Kawambwa District and also the home of the Luena Farming Block.

Madam Chairperson, at the moment, we have K1,709,266,492 in the RRU account and weather permitting, the following roads will be worked on.

(i) Paraffin/Chitondo;
(ii) Kawambwa/Kalungwishi;
(iii) Nachondwa embankment;
(iv) Kashiba/Kasenga Harbour;
(v) Kashimba/Mwenda;
(vi) Milenge/Lungomunkunta; and
(vii) Chisunka/Chisembe.

Madam Chairperson, come 2011, the wonderful people of Luapula Province will vote for President Banda and the MMD …

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Dr Kawimbe: … for giving them the following:

(i) the Mwanawasa Bridge;

(ii) a resurfaced Tuta Road at a cost of K160 billion;

(iii) a brand new dredger to rehabilitate water channels in the Bangweulu swamps;

(iv) four new district hospitals;

(v) four new high schools that are under construction;

(vi) four new high schools whose construction is scheduled to begin in 2011;

(vii) Kasama/Luwingu embankment whose construction is scheduled to commence in 2011; and

(viii) resurfacing of the Chembe/Mansa and Mansa/Kashikishi roads scheduled to begin after the rains next year; and

(ix) last but not the least, the Government has provided money to settle the terminal benefits of the Mansa Batteries workers and selling houses to them at an average price of K2.8 million which is the historical price of those houses.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Dr Kawimbe: Come 2011, the wonderful people of Luapula Province, even those who have no liking whatsoever for President Rupiah Bwezani Banda, will vote for him …

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Dr Kawimbe: … because, currently, the tendering process of awarding contracts for tarring the Pedicle Road is underway …

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Dr Kawimbe: … and works are scheduled to commence shortly after the rains next year.  The tarring of the Pedicle Road is the best Christmas present that President Banda could ever give to the wonderful people of Luapula Province.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Dr Kawimbe: Madam Chairperson, before I conclude, allow me to say that, as a Provincial Administration, we are going to carry out a thorough audit of the RRU. As you will notice from this year’s Yellow Book, we have decentralised our funds. The money will not be tied to any specific road, but equal amounts will be sent to each district so that the leadership in each district can decide on the priorities.

Mrs Masebo: Hear, hear!

Dr Kawimbe: Part of the review will consider decentralising the equipment. There is no reason we should keep all the twenty-three pieces of equipment in Mansa. Along with that, we will consider decentralising the staff.

Mrs Masebo: Hear, hear!

Ema Ministers, aya!

Dr Kawimbe: Finally, I would like to urge all hon. Members of Parliament to support the Estimates of Expenditure for Luapula Province.

I thank you, Madam.

Hon. Members: Hear, hear!{mospagebreak}

The Deputy Minister for North-Western Province (Mr Kalenga): Madam Chairperson, I thank you for allowing me to present the budget for the North-Western Province. As a provincial administration, we will fulfill the mandate and mission statement of the province which is to effectively and efficiently promote and co-ordinate sustainable development in the province in order to ensure quality and timely service delivery to the communities in a transparent, accountable and equitable manner.

  In 2011, the province will continue to implement programmes that are in line with the Sixth National Development Plan (SNDP) strategic focus, which is the provision of infrastructure to support the economic growth in the area.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Kalenga: Madam Chairperson, the budgeting was done in line with the guidelines provided by the Ministry of Finance and National Planning. The release of funds to the province has been timely and I urge the Ministry of Finance and National Planning to continue to release funds to the province next year as has been the case this year.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Kalenga: Madam Chairperson, the provincial budget for the year 2011 is K35.7 billion and this has been allocated as follows:
 
Amount  Programme

K11.8 billion  Personal Emoluments

K23.9 billion Non-Personal Emoluments Programmes

Madam Chairperson, some of the programmes to be undertaken by Provincial Administration include:

Resettlement Schemes

Madam Chairperson, as the province, we realise on top of our agenda that agriculture is the cornerstone of the province and the country. We are aware that we have mining activities going on in the country, but we have no control over tourism. We may have tourism in the province, but we believe that due to the availability of land and markets, our priority is to go into resettlement schemes to make it favourable for our people to do farming activities. This can also be improved by way of having good infrastructure. We have gone further to market our crop in Angola and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Madam Chairperson, we are also looking at diversifying our culture in the North-Western Province. We are going to embark on the construction of a cultural village in Solwezi to continue to enable artists exhibit their products. We cannot be talking about Victoria Falls alone. We should be talking about the source of the Zambezi River which is in North-Western Province. We also have the source of Kafue River which is known as Lwengwe in Mushindamo in Solwezi. Apart from these two major rivers, we also have the deepest river in Africa which is Kabompo River. This river is in North-Western Province.

Madam Chairperson, work will continue at the Kipushi Border Post so as to facilitate cross border trading activities with the DRC. The province would also commence works on the construction of Jimbe Border Post in order to enhance cross border trading between Zambia and Angola. This will result in widening the domestic revenue base for the country.

Madam, as a province, we will also look at water resource management and ground water development and management. Beekeeping development is on our agenda. As North-Western Province, we have a lot of potential in beekeeping. The honey which is found in the North-Western Province was also mentioned in the Bible. It was referred to as the milk and honey for that Promised Land.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Mining

Mr Kalenga: Madam Chairperson, as a province, we are endowed with a lot of mineral wealth. We believe that in order to attract local and foreign investment, mining activities will continue to play a role in the economic sector, not only in the province, but the whole country. In the North-Western Province, we also have Kansanshi Mine and Lumwana Mine which are the two biggest mines in the province. We await the opening of Kalumbila Mine in Solwezi and we will spend about K3.6 billion in supporting this project. This will be the biggest mine in the whole world and will create employment for our people in the province.

Madam Chairperson, as the Provincial Administration, we would like to acknowledge the plan by the Ministry of Works and Supply to upgrade the Solwezi/Chingola Road in order to cope with the increased traffic projection as a result of increased mining activities.

Madam Chairperson, we also appeal to the hon. Minister of Communications and Transport to expedite the process of constructing a railway line from Chingola to Jimbe in the North-Western Province as this will easy up pressure on the road. This will open up full scale trade with Angola.

Madam Chairperson, we also asked the hon. Minister of Communications and Transport to embark on the long awaited extension of the Solwezi Airport Runway in view of the fact that international chatter flights are on the increase coupled with the emergence of the mining activities.

Madam Chairperson, we thank the Government for connecting Mwinilunga, Kabompo, Zambezi, Mufumbwe and Chavuma to the national grid.  This will enable us construct many hydropower stations where possible as this is one way of attracting meaningful investment in the five districts.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Kalenga: Madam Chairperson, I am happy to report to the House that works on the M8 Road from Kasempa Turnoff to Chavuma has progressed very well.

Mrs Masebo: Start dancing!

Mr Kalenga: As I am talking, I can even start dancing…

Laughter

Mr Kalenga: …but it is unparliamentary.

Laughter

Mr Kalenga: Madam Chairperson, as I am talking to you, work is progressing very well and they are now at the border between Kabompo and Mufumbwe. They have done at least about 44 kilometres. We have a second contractor which is the China New Era International Engineering Corporation. This contractor is already on site in Kabompo and its workers have already done10 kilometres this year.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Kalenga: Madam Chairperson, as I am talking, we have a third contractor on site in Zambezi who is working on the Zambezi/ Mumbezhi Road. There are also plans to tender for the fourth contractor to work on the Zambezi/Chavuma Road. I know, my colleagues from the Opposition have nothing to say about the roads and they will have no story to tell next year, in 2011.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Kalenga: This is the work of the good Government under the leadership of His Excellency Rupiah Bwezani Banda.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Kalenga: Madam Chairperson, the Ministry of Finance and National Planning should continue with the releases of funds for budgeted for programmes as has been the case in the previous years to ensure effective implementation of the programme.

Madam Chairperson, in conclusion, the Ministry of Finance and National Planning should continue increasing funding to the province in view of the continued expansion in economic activities in the province. I therefore, ask the hon. Members to give favourable consideration for the Budget for the North-Western Province.

I thank you, Madam Chairperson.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

The Deputy Minister for Western Province (Mr Mwapela): Madam Chairperson, thank you very much for giving me the Floor to say a few words to the House outlining the budget brief for 2011 and what the people of Western Province expect.

Madam Chairperson, as a province, we continue to recognize that poverty and illiteracy are still widespread in our province and, therefore, our strategic focus remains and I quote: “To ensure increased investment in infrastructure and human development”.

Madam Chairperson, from the onset, I wish to commend the co-operating partners who have been able to honour their commitment to key programmes and projects under the implementation in my province. I also wish to reiterate the significant improvements attained under the 2010 Budget mainly, as a result of Government’s commitment in releasing funds to the province.

Madam, under the 2011 Budget, we hope to continue to ensure effective and efficient provision of increased and equitable access to quality socio-economic services in order to uplift the living standards of the people of Western Province. The people of this province are beginning to see positive changes aimed at bettering their lives.

Budget Outlook

Madam Chairperson, in 2010, the Government allocated K31.5 billion to my province. In 2011, the Provincial Budget amounts to a total of K35.7 billion broken down as follows:

Personal Emoluments :                             K13.3 billion 

Non Personal Emoluments: RDC’s           K14.1 billion

                                                 PRP               K8.3 billion


Madam Chairperson, you will note that there is an increase in the provincial allocation by K4.2 billion. 17 per cent of this increase consists of additional funds for PRP programmes and projects.

In view of the above budget outlook, you will note that budgeting for 2011 continued to be challenging. I therefore, hope that line ministries will continue supporting my province with the funds allocated in the 2011 Budget for projects and programmes.

This will indeed, go a long way in supplementing efforts being made by the Provincial Administration in addressing poverty levels that currently is still at 84 per cent. This is not a record and figure one can be proud of. That is why the MMD Government is working flat out to ensure positive change in the lives of our people in the Western Province.

   Projects and Programmes

Madam Chairperson, having stated the strategic focus for 2011, allow me to also briefly outline the programmes and projects for my province.

Road Infrastructure

Madam Chairperson, development comes with better infrastructure especially roads which play a major role in improving the social conditions of the people.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Mwapela: It should be noted that there is a big challenge to construct roads in my province due to sandy terrain coupled with inadequate construction material like gravel. In this respect, huge amounts of funds are required accordingly.

Madam Chairperson, under the 2010 work plan for Rural Roads Unit (RRU), my province managed to gravel a total of 223 kilometers of road. The major ones include:

(i) Chilombo/Katoya Road in Kaoma;

(ii) Kalabo/Kalongola Road in Kalabo (on-going);

(iii) Limulunga/Ushaa Road in Mongu; and

(iv) Simungoma/Machile Road in Sesheke

I am glad to note that K6 billion of PRP funds will be channeled towards construction of roads in the 2011 budget. With this allocation, I am sure that our targets will increase significantly.

Madam Chairperson, I also wish to note the major projects that have been commissioned with funding from Road Development Agency and co-operating partners. Prominent among them are:

(a) Mongu/Kalabo Road at a cost of K1.3 trillion;

(b) Senanga/Sesheke Road with a bridge in Sioma on the Zambezi River at a cost of K708 billion.

These works have already commenced and are expected to be completed by July 2012.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Mwapela: The people will very happy to have these roads opened by the Government of His Excellency Mr Rupiah Bwezani Banda.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Mwapela: It is this and other unprecedented developmental programmes spearheaded by the MMD Government that will ensure victory for this Government in 2011.

 Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

 Community development and Social Welfare

Mr Mwapela: Madam Chairperson, under the 2011 Budget, we hope to revamp and rehabilitate these institutions so that they begin to offer training to our people. The Government has also continued to disburse Food Security Packs and women empowerment funds.

Education Sector

Madam Chairperson, under the 2010 Budget, my province ensured expanded access to education through the construction of infrastructure at both basic and high school levels. A total of 156 school projects continued to be implemented at a cost of K222 billion.

The recruitment of 220 teachers by the Government in March this year has improved staffing levels in my province.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Skills Development

Mr Mwapela: Madam Chairperson, under the Technical Education, Vocational and Entrepreneurship training (TEVET) programmes, it is gratifying to note that the Government has completed construction projects that were ongoing like Mongu and Kaoma Trades Training institutes at a total cost of K8.1 billion.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Mwapela: Further, a new site has also been identified in Kalabo and will be launched by the end of this year.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Health Sector

Mr Mwapela: Madam Chairperson, my province has continued with efforts to bring health care to remote areas. Most remote areas in the province still lack access to health care services. Construction of three district hospitals in Mongu, Shang’ombo and Kaoma is in progress at an advanced stage.

Madam Chairperson, it is my sincere hope that the Ministry of Health will allocate more infrastructure development funds to my province next year to ensure that most health projects are completed and operational.

Madam Chairperson, in terms of disease burden, I am happy to note that my province recorded significant reduction in the incidence of major diseases like malaria. I am hopeful that with continued implementation and scaling up of indoor residual spraying, the incidence of malaria will reduce even further.

Madam Chairperson, some of the challenges encountered by this sector in my province is inadequate medical equipment, technical and support staff. It is, therefore, the wish of the people of the Western province that the Ministry of Health budget for 2011 will help us address some of these challenges being faced by the sector.

Water and Sanitation

Madam Chairperson, my province to increase access to clean water and sanitation for the people of Western Province. This year, my province recorded remarkable progress in borehole construction and rehabilitation. A total of 282 boreholes were constructed compared to forty in 2009. More constructions will be undertaken next year. 

Water Transport

Madam Chairperson, canal development continues to be priority in terms of improving water transport and draining of excess water from the flood plain thus facilitating production of winter crops.

I am glad to note that the Government of His Excellency Rupiah Bwezani Banda has this year procured a dredger machine at a cost of K3.5 billion.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!
Mr Mwapela: The people of this province who depend on canals are very happy with Government’s effort to bring the long awaited dredger machine which will go a long way in alleviating the suffering of the people of the Western Province.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Mwapela: I am also hopeful that with good drainage of canals, my province will see positive change in rice and maize production. I want to appeal to the Ministry of Communications and Transport to consider allocating funds for canals development in the province.

Farmer Input Support Programme (FISP)

Madam Chairperson, following the review of farmer Input Support Programme, the number of beneficiaries increased under the 2009/2010 farming season. I wish to note with happiness that this increase resulted in the bumper harvest. I am glad to state that actual purchases of maize and rice have exceeded the planned purchases by 58 per cent and 315 per cent respectively.  

Madam Chairperson, you will agree with me that this is a tremendous achievement that has come through the good policies of the MMD. I would like to commend our farmers for the positive response that has increased their agricultural output.

I am also glad to note that the Food Reserve Agency increased the number of satellite depots from thirty in 2009 to eighty-two in 2010. However, my province still requires more satellite depots to ensure that all farm blocks are covered adequately.

Public Order and Safety

Madam Chairperson, under the 2010 Budget we saw increased investment in the Judiciary in my province. A total of K3 billion was allocated for construction of 10 local courts in the seven districts of the province.

Madam Chairperson, it is our hope that most infrastructure projects will be supported by line ministries and that such support will be rendered on time since our implementation period is limited. We shall remain committed to ensuring that all developmental projects under implementation are completed on time so that our communities begin to benefit from these structures.

I wish to end my submission by thanking all co-operating partners who have continued to render unconditional support to the Western Province and all hon. Members who supported this budget.

Madam Chairperson, I thank you.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

The Deputy Minister for Eastern Province (Mr I. Banda): Madam, Chairperson, I would like to thank you for giving me this opportunity to respond to some of the concerns raised by hon. Members of Parliament from my province.

Mr Shawa: Hammer! Banda!

Mr I. Banda: In the first place, let me take the policy statement issued by His Honour the Vice-President as my own and go straight into answering the concerns that were raised. I will start with the RRU and the K5 billion that was allocated to us in the 2010 Budget.

Madam Chairperson, as a province, we allocated this money equitably to all the constituencies where we had not done using the RRU resources in the previous year. I have heard many hon. Members of Parliament talking about equitable distribution of resources. Yes, this is true. As a province, we critically looked at what type of resources that have been allocated and to which constituency.

Madam Chairperson, the province received contractors to rehabilitate agriculture feeder roads in three districts namely, Chipata, Katete and Lundazi meaning that about ten constituencies were already covered. However, even then, the other constituencies in these three districts did not benefit much from this exercise. Out of the ten constituencies, three districts under this project received massive road rehabilitation such as Lundazi District which involved massive road networks in Chasefu covering more than 100 km in Lundazi Constituency and covering almost the same as Chasefu. Lumezi Constituency benefited little because it has a valley area where agriculture is less done.

Madam, in Chipata District and Chipangali, in particular, there was massive road rehabilitation out of the Agriculture Feeder Road Fund.

Mr V. Mwale: Hear, hear! Zoona!

Mr I. Banda: In Katete, under the same project, a lot of work has been done covering all the three constituencies. The Chinese who were contracted in all these three districts are going to maintain these roads up to 2014. So far, as an administration, we looked at how equitably we would allocate these resources from the RRU. This is the reason we thought we had to look at the constituencies which did not benefit form this funding. Therefore, we thought of taking the money and work on the main road from Chipata to Chadiza through Luangeni Constituency to serve the people of Chadiza. We also did Katete/Chadiza Road and, now, we are gong to grade the Katete/Nsolo Road.

 Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Mr I. Banda: Madam Chairperson, we have also worked on the T4 Joint with the Great East Road to Chief Nyalugwe in Nyimba District. Again, in Katete, we have finished grading the Katate/Chadiza Road except for installation of culverts which we are still going to do. In Chipata and Chadiza, we first worked on 22 km, under the RDA, using a Chinese company and part of the Chipata/Chadiza Road under the programme of Agriculture Feeder Road Fund.

 Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Mr I. Banda: The rest of the Chipata/Chadiza Road has been undertaken by the RRU and the road will be completed by next week.

 Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Mr I. Banda: This road passes through Luangeni to Chadiza constituency.

 Mr A. Mbewe: Hear, hear!

Mr I. Banda: Madam Chairperson, next week, we are starting the Katete/Msoro Road covering part of Mkaika, Kasenengwa and Malambo constituencies. We hope to complete it before the rains get very heavy.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Mr I. Banda: In Malambo Constituency, we are also opening a new road from Mfuwe Town to Chief Malama and the works are ongoing. Our aim is to join Ukwimi in Msanzala Constituency, in future, as and when funds permit. We also worked on the Masumba to Chief Nsefu Road.

Madam Chairperson, because we have many roads that need rehabilitation under this programme, we have engaged the machinery from the ZNS for the next fourteen days to work on the Chipangali/Mazatuwa Road before the rains get heavy.

Mr V. Mwale: Hear, hear!

Mr I. Banda: The rest of the constituencies that have been touched, this year, have had funds allocated in the next year’s Budget, which we are going to approve to day.

Madam Chairperson, let me take this opportunity to thank all hon. Members of Parliament who have allocated part of their CDF to the rural roads rehabilitation in their constituencies. Let us continue …

Business was suspended from 1615 hours to 1630 hours.

[THE CHAIRPERSON OF COMMITTEES in the
 Chair]

Mr I. Banda: Madam Chairperson, before business was suspended, I was thanking all hon. Members of Parliament who have allocated part of their CDF to the rural roads rehabilitation in their constituencies. Let us continue beefing up the RRU with more resources because the money that is allocated by this august House is little compared to the demand that we have out there for rehabilitation of our feeder roads.

Madam Chairperson, let me also comment on the issue of lobbying the Government to establish value addition industries. I would like to assure the hon. Members that we are working very hard on this issue. If all goes well, we expecting to start a tobacco processing plant by early next year in the provincial capital.

 Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Mr I. Banda: We want our tobacco farmers to be encouraged to produce more and get more money and pay less transport costs. The Ministry of Agriculture and Co-operatives together with the Tobacco Boards of Zambia (TBZ) are working on that issue.

Madam, on value addition to cotton, we are already ginning cotton seen in many of our districts. In Katete, Dunavant has a plant which produces oil and other products from the cotton seed. This means that we are on course trying to add value to these farm products.

 Mr Shawa: Hammer!

Security along the Border

Mr I. Banda:  Madam Chairperson, this issue is handled very well with the two Governments of Malawi and Zambia. The two people who are involved in this act were apprehended and the Malawian Government promised that it would deal with the two culprits and a report …

Interruptions

The Chairperson: Order!

We need order because it is like there is a competition to talk between the person on the Floor and other hon. Members. Please, consult quietly.

May the Deputy Minister please continue.

Mr I. Banda: Madam Chairperson, I was talking about the security along the border line with Malawi.

Madam Chairperson, this issue is handled very well between the two Governments of Malawi and Zambia. The two people who were involved in this act were apprehended and the Malawian Government promised that it would deal with the two and a report would be given to us as soon as possible over this matter. The sensitisation on both sides of Zambia and Malawi has been ongoing and we are also sensitising our people on the issue of the new boarder demarcation.

Human-Animal Conflict

Madam Chairperson, the issue of human-animal conflict has been going on in these areas since time immemorial. People in these areas are sensitised in which areas they should not trespass. It is just unfortunate that our people are found in these accidents from time to time and hope that with the sensitisation from expert officers from the Zambia Wildlife Authority (ZAWA), many people will take precaution on this issue.

Madam Chairperson, we are aware that both human beings and fields get destroyed by wild animals. Our people in these areas are taught how they can protect their fields from these destructive wild animals.

Madam Chairperson, all in all, the Eastern Province has grown in terms of development in all sectors, be it in education, health and agriculture, among others. We, therefore, call upon all those who may need to invest in the Eastern Province to come and invest without delay.

Madam Chairperson, I thank you.

 Hon. Members: Hear, hear!

The Deputy Minister for Central Province (Mr A. Banda): Madam Chairperson, let me start by thanking all hon. Members of Parliament in the Central Province.

Madam, I will start by responding to some queries from two Members of Parliament, Hon. Shakafuswa, Member of Parliament for Katuba and Hon. Kasoko, Member of Parliament for Mwembeshi, although both are not in the House at the moment.

Mr Munkombwe: You see!

Mr A. Banda: Hon. Shakafuswa, I should say, this time around, has improved.

Hon. Members: Hear, hear!

Laughter

Mr Munkombwe: He is born again!

Mr A. Banda: He is born again.

Hon. Members: Hear, hear!

Laughter

Mr A. Banda: Hon. Kasoko is also born again.

Laughter

Hon. Members: Hear, hear!

Mr A. Banda: Madam Chairperson, the mission statement of the Central Province is:
“To facilitate and co-ordinate social, economic and ecological development through effective resource mobilisation and utilisation, capacity building, monitoring and evaluation to ensure sustainable and improved quality of life of both rural and urban communities.”

Hon. Government Member: Hear, hear!

Mr A. Banda: Madam Chairperson, on rural roads, I wish to say that funds amounting to K5 billion were allocated and released to the RRU programme. The rural roads equipment is in the province. It is expected that road works amounting to 466 km will be covered by the end of 2010. This includes Mungule Road in Katuba Constituency. Other roads that have been worked on in the Central Province are: Muzamani/Lusiwasi Road, …

Hon. Member: Hear, hear!

Mr A. Banda: … 52 km; Ngabwe, 103 km; Chowa/Kasosolo Road, 32 km and Gibbson/Putam, which is in Chitambo Constituency, 15 km. Installation of culverts is going on in Kabwe Urban. On Monday, the roads repair equipment will move to Malambanya and Malcolm Moffat Road.

Hon. Governments: Hear, hear!

Mr A. Banda: In two weeks time, Kaindu/Mpusu Road, in Mumbwa, will be worked on. Situmbeko/Kabibe, Chimbotela/Situmbeko roads and Chitina Road in Mkushi North will also be worked on.

Ms Changwe: Hear, hear!

Mr A. Banda: Chikupili Road in Mkushi South will be worked on.

Mr Chisanga: Hear, hear! Hammer General, Hammer!

Mr A. Banda: Madam Chairperson, the outlook for the 2011 budgetary allocation to the province is K35,229,577,751 billion …

The Chairperson: Speak through the microphone, please.

Mr A. Banda: … of which K14,131,142,731 is for Personal Emoluments and K11,758,717 billion is for the Recurrent Departmental Charges. A total of K9,339,455,303 billion has been allocated for the implementation of the SNDP programmes in the province which are as follows: Under rural roads, K6 billion has been allocated for rehabilitation and construction of rural roads in the province; a total of K225 million has been allocated for Infrastructure Development, (civil works) for offices and staff houses, especially in the districts.

Mr Shawa: Hammer Banda hammer!

Mr A. Banda: Funds amounting to K1 billion have been set aside for the construction and rehabilitation of schools in the provinces. Under health, the construction, repair and maintenance of health facilities in the province has been allocated K300 million. A total of K500 million has been allocated for the cattle restocking exercise.

Hon. Member: Hear, hear!

Mr A. Banda: Madam Chairperson, an addition of K100 million has been reserved for the completion of the construction of the provincial running unit office block at Provincial Administration level. The land resettlement programme has been allocated K200 million for demarcation of plots and settler selection interviews and plot allocation at Katikulula Resettlement Scheme in Chitambo and Serenje. Community development has been allocated K150 million for economic empowerment projects through procurement and distribution of goats to vulnerable, but viable communities.

Mr Shawa: Hear, hear!

Mr A. Banda: In the cultural industry, K370 million has been allocated for ongoing construction of a cultural village in Kabwe and establishing cultural centres in Chibombo and Mkushi districts.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Shawa: Culture!

Mr A. Banda: Restoration and Afforestation Programme has been allocated K26,770,713 to ensure that the environment is conserved. Under the Water Resource Development Programme, a total of K350 million has been allocated for drilling of bore-holes to ensure safe and clean water is available to communities in the province.

Hon. Member: Finally!

Mr Muntanga: Chimwela mwana!

Mr A. Banda: Madam Chairperson, I am a man of few words …

Hon. Members: Hear, hear!

Mr A. Banda: … and action-oriented.

In conclusion …

Hon. Members: Hear, hear! Hammer!

Laughter

Mr A. Banda: … Madam Chairperson, the development efforts during 2011 will continue to address poverty reduction in line with the SNDP 2011 to 2015 and the National Long Term Vision 2030.

Mr Shawa: Hear, hear! Ee ma solider!

Mr A. Banda: Every effort will continue to be made towards enhancing the efficiency of the programme implementation and monitoring at local level. It is further hoped that disbursement of funds for development programmes will continue to be timely and as per approved budget.

Madam Chairperson, I, therefore, implore the hon. Members of this House to also collectively, actively and consistently contribute to the development process in their respective constituencies, if the 2030 National Vision is to be achieved.

I thank you, Madam Chairperson.

Hon. Members: Hear, hear!

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice (Mr Kunda, SC.) : Madam Chairperson, the hon. Deputy Provincial Ministers have covered most of the issues raised by the hon. Members. What is disappointing and must be put on record is that those who raised these issues have disappeared from the House and have not been here to listen to our responses. This is disappointing for us. Otherwise, I wish to thank all the hon. Members for the support.

I thank you, Madam Chairperson.

Hon. Members: Hear, hear!

Vote 90/01 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 90/02 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

VOTE 90/03 – (Office of the President – Lusaka Province – Rural Roads Department – K6,729,741,374).

Mrs Masebo (Chongwe): Madam Chairperson, on Programme 8, Activity 09 – Grading 15km – Kanakantapa Road – Nil, Activity 10 – Grading  12km – Lubalashi Road – Nil,  Activity 11 – Grading, Regravelling  - 12km Kapete Road – Nil and Activity 12 – Heavy Grading – 25km Shimunguwo Road – Nil. May I know what will happen since these roads have not been rehabilitated and are important roads vis-à-vis agriculture, but there is no funding for them in the 2011 Budget.

Mr Shawa: Madam Chairperson, the year has not ended and so the roads will be rehabilitated and we hope that more roads will be repaired next year.

I thank you, Madam.

Vote 90/03 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 90/08 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 90/09 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 90/16 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 90/18 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 90/19 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 90/23 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

VOTE 90/24 – (Office of the President – Lusaka Province – Social Welfare Department – K1,111,872,409).

Mrs Masebo: Madam Chairperson, on Programme 3, Activity 01 – Matero After Care Centre – Nil. May I know why there is no funding for this centre.

Mr Shawa: Madam Chairperson, the activity has been taken by the Ministry of Community Development and Social Services.

I thank you, Sir.

Vote 90/24 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

VOTE 90/25 – (Office of the President – Lusaka Province – Cultural Services Department – K472,638,226).

Mrs Masebo: Madam Chairperson, may I have clarification on Programme 8 -Cultural Promotion – K37,420,000, I see that the only amount put there for the programme is K37,420,000, and yet there was a policy announcement by His Honour the Vice-President that there will be cultural villages that will be constructed at traditional ceremony grounds. Therefore, I would like to find out from the hon. Minister why that has not been taken into account in his budgeting.

Mr Shawa: Madam Chairperson, the funding for the construction of cultural villages in other areas will have to be taken by the Ministry of Community and Social Services in whose ambit cultural activities are.

I thank you, Madam Chairperson.

Vote 90/25 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 90/40 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 90/41 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

VOTE 90/42 – (Officer of the President – Lusaka Province – Resettlement Department – K591,069,976).

Mrs Masebo: Madam Chairperson, may I have clarification on Programme 8, Activity 01 – Land Resource Survey – K50,845,140, Activity 02 – Development Control Monitoring – K23,254,939, for the whole programme there, I see there is a K74,100,079 and no mention of the schemes that have been established or that are being established in Lusaka Province. These scheme are mainly or only currently in Chongwe namely; Kasenga Resettlement, Kanakantapa Resettlement, the new Mwanawasa Resettlement and the Kampasa Resettlement that is up coming, but they have not been given any funding. How is the province going to help us there?

The Chairperson: I will guide that, generally, these are questions on clarifications not introduction of votes that may not appear because then, you will have a lot of questions such as why my clinic is not in the budget.

Vote 90/42 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 90/43 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 90/44 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 90/46 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 90/48 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 90/49 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

VOTE 90/51 – (Office of the President – Lusaka Province – Provincial Accounting Office – K1,204,965,502).

Mrs Masebo: Madam Chairperson, may I have clarification on page 1391, Programme 2 – General Administration …

The Chairperson: Order! Can you tell us the page, again?

Mrs Masebo: Page 1391.

The Chairperson: We are not yet there, you may wait.

Mrs Masebo: I thank you, Madam.

Vote 90/51 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

VOTE 90/52 – (Office of the President – Lusaka Province – District Administration – K3,155,287,808).

Mrs Masebo: Madam Chairperson, may I have clarification on Programme 2 – General Administration – K447,016,920. I see that this programme’s resources have reduced from K544,120,000 to K447,0160,920, and yet we know that the work of the District Commissioners (DC) of visiting the district needs substantial resources. Currently, the DC in Chongwe has to ask for resources from the council for him to visit Shikabeta and all the other places in Chongwe District. As you will appreciate, Chongwe is the second largest district in Zambia. I would like to find out why the hon. Minister has reduced funding to the district administration.

Mr Shawa: Madam Chairperson, she has taken the block figure at the end, but I must say that all programmes in many other areas in line ministries and all line departments have been given money for monitoring. This is why we had to reduce on this figure.

I thank you, Madam Chairperson.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!{mospagebreak}

Vote 90/52 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 90/53 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 90/55 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 91/01 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 91/02 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 91/03 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 91/09 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 91/16 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 91/17 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 91/18 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 91/19 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 91/23 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 91/24 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 91/25 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 91/35 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 91/36 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 91/37 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 91/40 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 91/41 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 91/42 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 91/43 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 91/44 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 91/45 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 91/46 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 91/47 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 91/48 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 91/49 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 91/51 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 91/52 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 91/53 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 91/54 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 91/55 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Vote 92/01 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 92/02 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 92/03 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 92/8 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 92/09 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 92/16 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 92/17 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 92/18 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 92/19 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 92/23 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 92/24 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 92/25 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 92/35 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 92/36 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 92/37 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 92/40 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 92/41 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 92/42 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 92/43 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 92/44 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 92/45 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 92/46 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 92/48 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 92/49 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 92/51 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 92/52 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 92/53 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 92/54 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Vote 93/01 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 93/02 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 93/03 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 93/09 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 93/16 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 93/17 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 93/18 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 93/19 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 93/23 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 93/24 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 93/25 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 93/35 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 93/36 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 93/37 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 93/40 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 93/41 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 93/42 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 93/43 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 93/44 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 93/46 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 93/48 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 93/49 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 93/51 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 93/52 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 93/53 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 93/55 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 93/56 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 94/01 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 94/02 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 94/07 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 94/09 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 94/16 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 94/17 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 94/18 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 94/19 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 94/23 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 94/24 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 94/25 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 94/35 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 94/35 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 94/36 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 94/40 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 94/41 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 94/42 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 94/43 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 94/44 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 94/46 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 94/47 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 94/48 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 94/49 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 94/52 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 94/53 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 94/54 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 94/55 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 95/01 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 95/02 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 95/03 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 95/09 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 95/16 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 95/17 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 95/18 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 95/19 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 95/23 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 95/24 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 95/25 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 95/35 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 95/36 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 95/40 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

VOTE 95/41 – (Office of the President – Eastern Province – Youth Development Department – K849,060,618).

Mr V. Mwale: Madam Chairperson, may I have clarification on Programme 10, Activity 03 – Monitoring of Youth Projects. In the 2010 Budget, K30,200,000 million was provided. Therefore, why is there no provision for Monitoring of Youth Projects in the 2011 Budget when are funding a lot of youth groups?

Mr I. Banda: Madam Chairperson, the ministry has taken up that programme.

I thank you, Madam.

Hon. Members: Hear, hear!

Vote 95/41 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 95/42 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 95/43 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 95/44 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 95/46 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 95/47 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 95/48 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 95/49 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 95/51 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 95/52 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 95/53 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 95/54 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Hon. Members: Hear, hear!

VOTE 96/01 – (Office of the President – Luapula Province – Headquarters – K8,332,182,551).

Mr Chongo: Madam Chairperson, on Programme 8, Activity 02 – Fish Ban Enforcement and Fisheries Monitoring, there is no allocation so I would like to find out whether this exercise will not be undertaken next year.

Dr Kawimbe: Mr Chairperson, this particular activity has now moved over to the Ministry of Livestock and Fisheries Development.

I thank you, Madam Chairperson.

Vote 96/01 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 96/02 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 96/03 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 96/08 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 96/90 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 96/16 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 96/17 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 96/18 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 96/19 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 96/23 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 96/24 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 96/25 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 96/35 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 96/36 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 96/37 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 96/40 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 96/41 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 96/42 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 96/43 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 96/44 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 96/46 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 96/48 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 96/49 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 96/51 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 96/52 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 96/53 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 96/55 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Hon. Members: Hear, hear!

Vote 97/01 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 97/02 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 97/03 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 97/09 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 97/16 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 97/17 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 97/18 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 97/19 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 97/23 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 97/24 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 97/25 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

The Chairperson: Order!

Business was suspended from 1815 hours until 1830 hours.


[THE CHAIRPERSON OF COMMITEES in the Chair]

Vote 97/35 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 97/36 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 97/40 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 97/41 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Interruptions

The Chairperson: Order!

Vote 97/42 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 97/43 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 97/44 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 97/46 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 97/47 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 97/48 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 97/49 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 97/51 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 97/52 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 97/53 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 97/54 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Hon. Members: Hear, hear!

Vote 98/01 ordered to stand part of the Estimates

Vote 98/02 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 98/03 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 98/08 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 98/09 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 98/16 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 98/17 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 98/18 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 98/19 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 98/23 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 98/24 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 98/25 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 98/36 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 98/37 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 98/40 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 98/41 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 98/42 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 98/43 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

VOTE 98/44 – (Office of the President – Southern Province – K680,036,630).

Mrs Masebo (Chongwe): Madam Chairperson, since I care more about the people of Southern Province than the UPND Members, …

Hon. UPND Members: Aah!

Mrs Masebo: … may I have clarification on page 1,659, on Unit 1, Programme 9, Activity 01, Quarterly and Special Meetings – Nil, there was a provision of K20,000,000 this year, but no funds have been provided for next year. Are you saying that there will be no activity under this Programme since there is no funding for the Provincial Local Government Appeals Board?

Mr Muchima: Madam Chairperson, this activity has been taken over by the Local Government Commission.

I thank you, Madam Chairperson.

Interruptions

Mr Muntanga: There is no commission yet!

Interruptions

Mrs Masebo: Madam Chairperson, what the hon. Minister has said is not correct. There is no Local Government Service Commission yet. This body needs to solve the problems of the staff. As you have heard …

The Chairperson: No debate, please. You have already made your point.

Mrs Masebo: Thank you, Madam.

Mr Muchima: Madam Chairperson, it is Local Government Headquarters.

I thank you, Madam.

Hon. Opposition Members: Aah!

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Vote 98/44 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 98/45 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 98/46 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 98/48 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 98/49 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 98/51 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 98/52 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 98/54 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 98/55 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Hon. Members: Hear, hear!

VOTE 99 – (Constitutional and Statutory Expenditure – K20,537,358,046,564).

Dr Musokotwane: Madam Chairperson, apart from managing public resources and the economic affairs of this country, the Ministry of Finance and National Planning is also responsible for contracting and managing Government debt. In doing so, the ministry will ensure that loan funds are used for the intended purposes and in line with our development agenda.

Madam Chairperson, since these are loans the Government contracts, they have to be serviced and repaid. Head 99 is, therefore, the head under which the Government provides for constitutional and statutory expenditures. These expenditures include provisions for external and domestic debt service, the medium term pay reforms or salaries and wages award for the Civil Service and contingency. In this respect, a total provision of K2,143.1 billion has been made available for the 2011 Fiscal Year.

Madam Chairperson, the Government borrows financial resources from domestic creditors mainly through the issuance of Government securities, treasury bills and bonds and from external creditors through loans in order to augment domestic revenues and finance spending.

Madam Chairperson, the overall debt management objective in 2011 will be to ensure that debt is procured at minimum cost and risk and is maintained at sustainable levels. In this regard, the Government will continue to review debt management strategies so as to continuously improve the management of public debt in line with changing economic circumstances. In the medium-term and with the assistance of multilateral institutions, the capacity building programme will be enhanced in order to improve debt management.

Madam Chairperson, the resources to be mobilised through concessional and non-concessional borrowing will be used to finance projects with high economic and social returns. In doing so, the Government will shift from non-concessional borrowing tied to specific projects to a sector based approach, focusing on energy and roads. As regards domestic borrowing, the Government will use the domestic market to raise funds in order to cover the projected budget deficit.

Madam Chairperson, I thank you.

Mrs Masebo: Madam Chairperson, …

Interruptions

Mrs Masebo: … first of all, I would like to commend the Government for the work they are doing.

Madam Chairperson, further, I would like to appeal to the Government to borrow for infrastructure development. There is nothing wrong with borrowing, but we should borrow for specific projects and those should be seen to be implemented. We should remember that we will not repay this money during our time. It is our children and grandchildren who will repay the loans.

Madam Chairperson, I want to emphasise that we should borrow for tangible reasons so that the people can see where the money they borrowed went. In the Kaunda era, they borrowed to build schools, universities and other things that we inherited which we can point at. Borrowing for roads is good, but I would like to see a situation where we borrow for proper infrastructure like schools, universities and housing for our public workers.

Interruptions

Hon. Member: Mwikala kwisa imwe, you cannot see new infrastructure?

Mrs Masebo: People should be able to see what we have done even after we are gone.

I thank you.

Interruptions

Dr Musokotwane: Madam Chairperson, I just wish to re-affirm and re-confirm that the reason we borrow is to build infrastructure. I would like to say that this country has incurred a lot of financial costs in the past on some of the roads which we have been constructing.

If you look at the Kasama/Luwingu Road, and Choma/Namwala Road, we have lost a lot of money because cash dispensing from the budget was obviously inadequate which means that most of the time contractors were standing idle and when they stand idle, they charge for that because it is idle time and so it makes perfect economic sense to borrow in this manner so that we accelerate the long outstanding projects such as the Kasama/Luwingu Road, Choma/Namwala Road, Mutanda/Chavuma Road and many others. It is good to have these roads worked on and it was also good to borrow so that we serve ourselves the financial charges that came with the machinery standing idle.

Madam Chairperson, I wish to thank the House for their support.

I thank you, Madam Chairperson.

Hon. Members: Hear, hear!

Vote 99/01 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 99/02 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 99/04 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Vote 99/05 ordered to stand part of the Estimates.

Hon. Members: Hear, hear!

____________

HOUSE RESUMED

[MR SPEAKER in the Chair]

The Estimates of Revenue and Expenditure (Including Capital and Constitutional and Statutory Expenditure) for the year 1st January, 2011 to 31st December, 2011 were reported to the House as having passed through Committee with amendments.

Report adopted and Mr Speaker appointed the Minister of Finance and National Planning to be a committee of one to bring in the necessary Bill to give effect to the resolution of the Committee of supply.

________

BILL

FIRST READING

The following Bill was read the first time:

The Appropriation Bill, 2010

Second Reading now.

SECOND READING

THE APPROPRIATION BILL, 2010

The Minister of Finance and National Planning (Dr Musokotwane):  Mr Speaker, the Bill before the House marks the end of the important work we started in the Committee of Supply. I wish to take this opportunity to express my sincere appreciation …

Mr Speaker: Order!

The hon. Minister is moving a bit ahead of schedule. Can he first move the second reading of the Bill. You beg to move that the Bill be now read the second time.

Dr Musokotwane: Mr Speaker, I beg to move that the Bill be now read the second time. I did what I did because I know that Hon. Muntanga is tired.

Laughter

Mr Speaker: It is understandable.

Dr Musokotwane: Mr Speaker, the Bill before the House marks the end of the important work we started in the Committee of Supply. I wish to take this opportunity to express my sincere appreciation to you for the judicious guidance in the conduct of business in the House. My gratitude also goes to the Deputy Speaker and Deputy Chairperson of the Committee, whose valuable contributions and efforts to this entire process I wish to recognise.

Mr Speaker, let me also mention the contribution made by the Leader of Government Business, His Honour the Vice-President, in the organisation of business of the House, thereby making the whole process run smoothly and promptly. I am also indebted to the Office of the Clerk of the National Assembly and her staff for the valuable assistance rendered to the entire process of approving the 2011 Budget.

Sir, lastly, but not the least, I wish to pay tribute to my hon. colleagues, on both sides of the House and through the various committees and individually, for their inputs and contributions to the entire process of executing the Motion and their advice on a number of issues that arose during the debates. In fact, let me take this opportunity to commend the entire House for breaking yet another record in approving the 2011 Budget in seven weeks. As this House appropriates the 2011 Budget by passing this Bill, I wish to remind my hon. colleagues that this is just part of the task that has been achieved and the other part is still to be done. I mean the execution of the 2011 Budget and its full implementation so that economic development can be achieved for the benefit of the Zambian people.

As Government, we will step up our efforts to raise the projected resources so that all programmes contained in the 2011 Budget can be implemented.

Sir, to my hon. colleagues, I wish to remind them to continue with the involvement in the implementation of the Budget especially the capital projects. They are a vital link to the Government in getting feedback on developmental matters so that remedial measures can be taken whenever required.

Sir, I also wish to call upon other stakeholders, including individual Zambians and non-governmental organisations (NGOs), to fully get involved in the implementation and execution of national programmes especially capital projects. In the 2011 Budget, the Government has made a very strong move to allocate a bigger share of the national cake to infrastructure development. This will in turn require stakeholders to act together and ensure that capital programmes are implemented successfully.

Mr Speaker, in conclusion, I wish to point out that this is a listening Government and it has taken note of the various development issues raised during the debate of the Budget motion. I am aware that hon. Members are in a hurry to see this country develop and I entirely agree with them. This Government is serious and on the right path and will deliver development to Zambia.

Mr Speaker, I take this opportunity to wish you, Madam Deputy Speaker, the Deputy Chairman of Committees, all hon. Members of this House and the Clerk and her staff a wonderful festive period. However, before I sit down, I have noticed that as people are listening to the debate, sometimes they get bored but in that boredom, they become very creative. One of these colleagues is no other than the learned man, Professor Lungwangwa. As he was drifting away from the debate, he wrote a short poem that I begged to read on his behalf and it reads as follows: 

“The Child called Zambia

Born in 1964 as a healthy and bubbly baby,
Fell ill in the mid 1970s and hospitalised,
Went in a coma in the 1980s,
Resuscitated in the 1990s,
Revived in the 2000s,
And on the road to full recovery as healthy and bubbly again.”

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Interruptions

Dr Musokotwane: Mr Speaker, of course, this is all happening under the leadership of the Movement for Multi-party Democracy (MMD).

I thank you, Mr Speaker.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Speaker: The Hon. Minister of Finance and National Planning may wind up that poetic …

Laughter

Mr Speaker: … thought.

Dr Musokotwane: Mr Speaker, I wish to thank the House on an individual basis for the support. It has been a pleasure to be in the position of hon. Minister of Finance and National Planning. This is obviously the last Budget that I am presenting in this Session and I wish to thank everyone for the co-operation that the Government and I have received. We, on this side, are, of course, looking forward to working very hard and continuing the job that we have started, including presentation of the Budget in 2011.

I thank you, Mr Speaker.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Question put and agreed to and the Bill read a second time.

Committee to a committee of the Whole House.

Committee on Friday 26th November, 2010.

__________

HOUSE IN COMMITTEE

[THE CHAIRPERSON OF COMMITTEES in the
Chair]

THE APPROPRIATION BILL, 2010

Interruptions

The Chairperson: Order!

Clauses 1 and 2 ordered to stand part of the Bill.

Schedule, ordered to stand part of the Bill.

Title agreed to.

Hon. Members: Hear, hear!

_________

HOUSE RESUMED

[MR SPEAKER in the Chair]

The following Bill was reported to the House as having passed through the Committee without amendments:

The Appropriation Bill, 2010

Third Reading today.

THIRD READING

The following Bill was read the third time and passed:

The Appropriation Bill, 2010

_________

ANNOUNCEMENT BY MR SPEAKER

INVITATION TO DINNER

Mr Speaker: Before we move on, I have the following short announcement to make. Hon. Members, I invite the hon. House for dinner in the restaurant downstairs.

Hon. Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Speaker: The dinner is on the House. Do not go up there. It is downstairs in the restaurant.

Laughter

Mr Speaker: Let me remind you that, as the wise people have said, if you leave a meal behind, you are likely to starve where you are going.

Laughter

Mr Speaker: In any case, there will be no dinner at the Motel because the dinner has moved here. I shall join you down there.

Hon. Members: Hear, hear!

_________

MOTION

ADJOURNMENT SINE DIE

The Vice-President and Minister of Justice (Mr Kunda, SC): Mr Speaker, I beg to move that the House do adjourn sine die.

Question put and agreed to.

_________

The House adjourned accordingly at 1922 hours on Friday, 26th November, 2010, sine die.

_________

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
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