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line Home arrow Debates & Proceedings arrow Fourth Session of the Tenth Assembly arrow Debates- Tuesday, 23rd February, 2010 Saturday, 25 October 2014  
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Debates- Tuesday, 23rd February, 2010 PDF Print E-mail
Friday, 26 February 2010
DAILY PARLIAMENTARY DEBATES FOR THE FOURTH SESSION OF THE TENTH ASSEMBLY
Tuesday 23rd February, 2010


The House met at 1430 hours


[MADAM DEPUTY SPEAKER in the Chair]


NATIONAL ANTHEM


PRAYER

_______


ANNOUNCEMENTS BY MADAM DEPUTY SPEAKER

ACTING LEADER OF GOVERNMENT BUSINESS IN THE HOUSE

Madam Deputy Speaker: Hon. Members, in the absence of His Honour the Vice-President and Minister of Justice, who is attending to other national duties, Hon. Lameck Mangani, MP, Minister of Home Affairs, will act as Leader of Government Business in the House from Tuesday, 23rd February to Thursday, 4th March, 2010.

Hon. Members: Hear, hear!

I thank you.

DEATH OF MR REUBEN CHISANGA BANDA, MEMBER OF PARLIAMENT FOR MILANZI

Madam Deputy Speaker: I wish to acquaint the House with a fact already sadly known that the House lost one of its Members, Mr Reuben Chisanga Banda, Member of Parliament for Milanzi Parliamentary Constituency, who passed away on Friday, 5th February, 2010, at the University Teaching Hospital (UTH).

The late Mr Reuben Chisanga Banda, MP, was buried in Katete on Monday 8th February, 2010. The House was represented at the burial by the following Members of Parliament and members of staff:

Hon. H. I. Mwanza, MP, Deputy Chief Whip (Leader of the Delegation);
Mr J. K. Zulu, MP;
Mr P. Sichamba, MP;
Ms E. M. Imbwae, MP;
Ms J. Kapata; MP;
Mr H. H. Hamududu, MP;
Mr B. Sikazwe, MP;
Mr P. P. Chanda, MP;
Mr V. Mwale, MP;
Mr J. B. Chongo, MP;
Mr B. Chanda, Assistant Chief Editor of Parliamentary Publications (Secretary to the Delegation); and
Mr A. Phiri, Parliamentary Security Officer.

I have already conveyed the sympathies and condolences of the House to the bereaved family.

May I now request the House to rise and observe a minute of silence in honour of the memory of the late Hon. Reuben Chisanga Banda.

Members of Parliament stood in silence for one minute.

I thank you.

SESSIONAL COMMITTEES ─ MEMBERSHIP

Madam Deputy Speaker: Hon. Members, I wish to inform the House that, in accordance with the provisions of the Standing Orders, the following appointments have been made to the Membership of some Sessional Committees in the light of the appointment of Hon. M. J. C. Misapa, MP, as Deputy Minister of Sport, Youth and Child Development:

Committee on Agriculture and Lands

Mr G. Namulambe, MP, to replace Hon. M. J. C. Misapa, MP.

Committee on Education, Science and Technology

Mr V. Mwale, MP, to replace Hon. M. J. C. Misapa, MP.

Committee on Energy, Environment and Tourism

Mr G. Namulambe, MP, to replace Mr V. Mwale, MP.

Hon. Members: Hear, hear!

I thank you.

MEMBERSHIP TO THE PAN-AFRICAN PARLIAMENT

Madam Deputy Speaker: Hon. Members, I wish to inform the House that after the usual consultations, Mrs S. T. Masebo, MP, has been designated Member of the Pan-African Parliament (PAP), to replace Hon. M. J. C. Misapa, MP, who has now been appointed Deputy Minister in the Executive Branch of the Government.

I thank you.

Hon. Members: Hear, hear!

______

BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE

The Minister of Home Affairs (Mr Mangani): Madam Speaker, I rise to give some idea of the business the House will consider this week. However, before I do this, allow me to welcome all hon. Members to the mid-session meeting of the House, following the change in the parliamentary calendar. Although hon. Members are just from attending to other important national duties, I believe that they are ready and anxious to undertake the business of the House in the next few weeks.

Madam Speaker, let me now turn to the business the House will consider this week. Today, Tuesday, 23rd February, 2010, the main business of the House will comprise items as indicated on the Order Paper.

Tomorrow, Wednesday, 24th February, 2010, the business of the House will begin with Questions, if there will be any. This will be followed by a presentation of Government Bills, if there will be any. Thereafter, the House will consider Private Members’ Motions, if there will be any. The House will then consider the Second Reading Stage of the Disaster Management Bill, 2009.

On Thursday, 25th February, 2010, the business of the House will begin with Questions, if there will be any. This will be followed by a presentation of Government Bills, if there will be any.

On Friday, 26th February, 2010, the business of the House will begin with His Honour the Vice-President’s Question Time. The House will then consider Questions, if there will be any. This will be followed by a presentation of Government Bills, if there will be any. Thereafter, the House will consider any other business that might have been presented earlier in the week.

Madam Speaker, I thank you.

Hon. Members: Hear, hear!

______

QUESTIONS FOR ORAL ANSWER

COLLECTIVE AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE GOVERNEMENT AND THE ZAMBIA AGENCY FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES

227. Mr D. Mwila (Chipili) asked the Minister of Labour and Social Security:

(a)    when a new collective agreement between the Government and the Zambia Agency for Persons with Disabilities would be entered into;

(b)    when the last collective agreement was signed;

(c)    why it had taken long to sign a new collective agreement; and

(d)    when salary structures of employees of the Zambia National Council for the Blind and those of the Zambia Agency for Persons with Disabilities would be harmonised

The Minister of Labour and Social Security (Mr Liato): Madam Speaker, first and foremost, I wish to state that the Government does not enter into direct negotiations with the Zambia Agency for Persons with Disabilities (ZAPD). ZAPD entered into negotiations with the union in 2006 when the 2005 Collective Agreement expired.

The new collective agreement was drawn up, but has not been signed by the negotiating parties. The two parties, however, concluded the negotiations in April, 2009 and the collective agreement will be submitted to the Ministry of Labour and Social Security for approval.

Madam Speaker, the last collective agreement was signed on 9th March, 2005. It ran from 1st January to 31st December, 2005. ZAPD and the union entered into negotiations, as far back as 2006, in order to have a new collective agreement in place. New collective agreements have been drawn and the negotiations have been completed and forwarded to the parent ministry which is the Ministry of Community Development and Social Services as per procedure.

The Zambia Council for the Handicapped is now called ZAPD. It came into being by the enactment of the Disabilities Act Number 33 of 1996. Currently, the agency is in the process of harmornising the salary structures for the employees who were working under the Zambian Council for the Handicapped.

 Madam Speaker, I thank you.

Mr D. Mwila: Madam Speaker, we expect a collective agreement to be signed immediately the negotiations are completed. It is now ten months, and yet the agreement has not been signed. Could the hon. Minister indicate to this House what the Government is doing about that.

Mr Liato: Madam Speaker, basically, issues of collective bargaining are between the union and the employer. As a ministry, we usually extend collective agreements when the negotiation processes are still going on. This could be one of such cases.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Mr Mukanga (Kantanshi): Madam Speaker, ZAPD is supposed to give loans to people living with disabilities, but why is it impossible for people living with disabilities to access these loans?

Mr Liato: Madam Speaker, although the question the hon. Member has asked has nothing to do with what is on the Order Paper, I wish to state that issues of loans and entitlements are part of collective agreements. Therefore, the hon. Member will do well to look at the existing collective agreement.
 
 I thank you, Madam Speaker.

 Mr Kambwili (Roan): Madam Speaker, if I heard the hon. Minister correctly, he said that the last agreement was signed in 2005 and it ran from January to December of that year. Which collective agreement was used from January, 2006 to December, 2008?

Mr Liato: Madam Speaker, if the hon. Member had tried to listen, earlier, he would have heard that I said that there were cases whose negotiations or processes of collective bargaining were still going on. In such cases, it is usually the old collective agreement that is applied because there is already a provision that the ministry can extend the lifespan of the existing one.

 I thank you, Madam Speaker.

CONTRACT BETWEEN NITROGEN CHEMICALS OF ZAMBIA AND AFRICAN EXPLOSIVES LIMITED

228. Mr D. Mwila asked the Minister of Agriculture and Co-operatives:

(a)    why the Nitrogen Chemicals of Zambia entered into a contract with African Explosives Limited for the manufacture of ammonium nitrate;

(b)    what the duration of the contract was; and

(c)    whether the contract provided that African Explosives Limited take over the top management of the company.

The Deputy Minister of Agriculture and Co-operatives (Mr Mbewe): The agreement signed between Nitrogen Chemicals of Zambia (NCZ) and African Explosives Limited (AEL) is a supply contract in which NCZ has undertaken to supply AEL with its requirements of explosive-grade ammonium nitrate. Currently, AEL imports all its ammonium requirements. NCZ has the necessary infrastructure for the production of ammonium nitrate and had previously, up to 2002, been supplying this product to Kafironda Limited.

The agreement was partly a culmination of NCZ’s earlier efforts to secure markets for its products. It was also a direct outcome of the Investment Promotion and Protection Agreement signed on 2nd December, 2008 between the Government of the Republic of Zambia (GRZ) and the Zambia Development Agency (ZDA) on one hand and AEL on the other, where AEL undertook to promote local businesses by sourcing ammonium nitrate locally.

This contract will provide NCZ with a ready market for ammonium nitrate which could be worth up to K110 billion per annum, depending on the volume of the product supplied. AEL is currently the largest consumer of this product in Zambia.

This contract could also be used by NCZ to borrow funds from lending institutions to enable it to rehabilitate the ammonium nitrate plant and procure raw materials. Currently, the ammonium nitrate plant is non-operational due to the need for rehabilitation and lack of working capital for raw materials and other operational needs. A total of K14 billion is required to repair the plant and procure raw materials to start it up. The implementation of the contract by NCZ will depend on the procurement of raw materials and repair of the plant.

It is intended that surplus revenues generated from this plant will enable NCZ to progressively rehabilitate its other non-operational units and ultimately make it financially independent.

Madam Speaker, the contract, which was signed on 31st August, 2009 is for an initial duration of five years, but it can be extended by the concerned parties.

The contract is purely a supply contract and does not provide for AEL taking over the top management of NCZ.

Madam Speaker, I thank you.

Mr D. Mwila: Madam Speaker, the Government made a commitment, last year, to invest money in NCZ. Would the hon. Minister indicate to this House whether that commitment has been changed?

Mr Mbewe: Madam Speaker, the commitment, which was made last year, still stands. Presently, there are studies taking place at NCZ. When the report is ready, the public will be informed accordingly.

 I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Mr Nkombo (Mazabuka Central): Madam Speaker, now that AEL has signed a contract with NCZ and the hon. Minister has confirmed that the cash flows of NCZ will soon be good, I would like to know where the former employees’ dues rank in the company’s priorities once it starts making profits.

Mr Mbewe: Madam Speaker, this Government is determination to settle the payments of all those who are owed money immediately NCZ is fully operational.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Mr Beene (Itezhi-tezhi): Madam Speaker, the price of fertiliser in the country is so high that it has contributed to NCZ’s failure to produce it. Why has the Government not considered privatising NCZ so that it can be viable and help this country since this Government has failed to recapitalise it?

Hon. Opposition Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Mbewe: Madam Speaker, I stated earlier that the studies were still under way and a decision will be made when the results of the studies are out.

Madam Speaker, in addition, I would like to say that this Government has created a conducive business atmosphere for our business partners.

Hon. Opposition Members: Aah! Question!

Mr Mbewe: Mr Speaker, I can challenge those who are saying ‘question’ by saying that …

Mr Kambwili: It is ‘Madam Speaker’ and not ‘Mr Speaker’.

Madam Deputy Speaker: Order!

Laughter

Mr Mbewe: Madam Speaker, I can challenge those who are trying to challenge me by saying that, at the moment, we have a conducive business atmosphere for fertiliser making. There are companies that are manufacturing fertiliser in the country.

Hon. Opposition Members: Where? Which ones?

Mr Mbewe: Madam, I am surprised that people are very ignorant of …

Madam Deputy Speaker: Order!

Hon. Minister, do not listen to those voices.

Laughter

Madam Deputy Speaker: Order! Order!

Stick to your response and give it clearly without referring to the heckling.

The hon. Deputy Minister may continue.

Mr Mbewe: I thank you, Madam Speaker. The environment for the fertiliser business is very conducive. There is a Zambian company which manufactures fertiliser locally. Last year, it produced over 90 metric tonnes of fertiliser which was supplied to the farmers.

Additionally, there is Green Belt, a company that is also manufacturing fertiliser. I am very surprised that hon. Members do not have this information.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear! Hammer!

Mr Kakoma (Zambezi West): Madam Speaker, the hon. Deputy Minister informed us that NCZ is looking for K14 billion to invest in the production of ammonium nitrate to supply AEL. I would like to find out whether the Government, in its commitments to NCZ, will provide the company with the K14 billion to start producing ammonium nitrate?

Mr Mbewe: Madam Speaker, as I stated earlier, studies are still going on and the Government will only come up with a final decision when these studies have been completed.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Mr Muntanga (Kalomo Central): Madam Speaker, I would like the hon. Minister to clarify his statement that a contract has been entered into between NCZ and AEL. The hon. Minister further informed the House that this will improve the cash flow of NCZ. How will this be possible when the ammonium nitrate plant has broken down?

Mr Mbewe: Madam Speaker, the agreement will come into effect after the rehabilitation and studies have been completed.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Mr Simuusa (Nchanga): Madam Speaker, I would like to find out from the hon. Minister why AEL was allowed to produce non-agricultural ammonium nitrate, and yet we import almost all the ammonium nitrate for agriculture. Why did the Government not allow a contract with, for instance, Omnia?

Mr Mbewe: Madam Speaker, this was permitted through a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) and we feel that when the final report comes out, a final decision will be made.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Interruptions

Mr Lubinda (Kabwata): Madam Speaker, the hon. Minister has mentioned the studies more than eight times. Can he be kind enough to inform this House what those studies are about? Is it the studies that should inform them whether they should change the main business of NCZ from fertiliser to producing explosive ammonium nitrate? Since he said that we are ignorant, could he, please, give us more information on whichever companies are producing fertiliser in Zambia besides the ones that only mix and repack the fertiliser that they import? May he, please, clarify this.

The Minister of Agriculture and Co-operatives (Mr Daka): Madam Speaker, Cabinet appointed a committee to understudy the way forward for NCZ. That is what the hon. Deputy Minister is trying to put across.

In addition, the Government will give NCZ a contract to manufacture about 20,000 metric tonnes of fertiliser. Once this is done, it will help improve the company’s balance sheet.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Mr Shakafuswa (Katuba): Madam Speaker, according to the answer given by the hon. Minister of Agriculture and Co-operatives, the contract between AEL and NCZ will come into effect after the rehabilitation of the nitrate plant. I would like to find out whether it is economical for us to engage a partner in the nitrate plant after the Government has spent so much money rehabilitating it. In this region, ammonium nitrate is produced in Zimbabwe and there is a huge market for it. It can also be produced by NCZ so as to maximise on the returns on investment …

Madam Deputy Speaker: You are debating. Could you ask your question?

Mr Shakafuswa: Is it economical for us to engage a partner after we have spent a lot of money on rehabilitating NCZ?

Mr Daka: Madam Speaker, the situation is such that rehabilitating the whole plant would require almost K74 billion. However, to rehabilitate the nitrate plant, we only require K14 billion. If NCZ is given the contract to supply fertiliser and AEL gives NCZ a contract, the economies of scale will be balanced to allow it to operate.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Mr Ntundu (Gwembe): Madam Speaker, the hon. Minister has talked about giving a contract to NCZ to supply fertiliser, and yet the Government owes NCZ. I would like to find out how NCZ will get back to its feet …

Mr Ntundu pointed at the hon. Minister.

Madam Deputy Speaker: Can that finger point downwards, please?

Laughter

Mr Ntundu: I would like the hon. Minister to explain to this House how possible it is for NCZ to get back to its normal operations when the Government owes it a colossal sum of money. Can the hon. Minister tell this House how NCZ will get back to its full operations?

Mr Daka: Madam Speaker, it is not possible for NCZ to get back to full throttle. We just want to make it produce what AEL requires. At the moment, NCZ owes a lot of banks money and, for the information of hon. Members, the Government has been bailing out the company.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

OPENING OF A PEPSI ZAMBIA PLANT IN LUSAKA

229. Mr Mwango (Kanchibiya) asked the Minister of Commerce, Trade and Industry:

    (a)    when Pepsi Zambia would open a plant in Lusaka;

(b)    how much money the bottling company intended to invest in the project;

(c)    what the source of funding for the project would be; and

(d)    how many jobs would be created by the project.

The Minister of Livestock and Fisheries Development (Mr Machila) (on behalf of the Minister of Commerce, Trade and Industry (Mr Mutati): Madam Speaker, Pepsi Varum Beverages Zambia Limited has commenced preparations of the piece of land where the plant by Pepsi Zambia is to be built. The company shall complete the construction of its plant and immediately commence production by March, 2010.

Madam Speaker, the company intends to invest US$30 million in the project that is financed by the shareholders and loan financing from India. It is expected to create a total of 214 direct jobs and 600 indirect jobs. The company will further put up 1,000 small outlets across the country that will provide employment to individuals, including the youth and underprivileged women.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Mr Mwango: Madam Speaker, I would like to find out how many foreign nationals the company will employ.

Mr Machila: Madam Speaker, the number of foreign nationals to be employed has not yet been finalised. Suffice it to say that this project will create 214 direct jobs and about 600 indirect jobs.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Mr Lumba (Solwezi Central): Madam Speaker, I would like to find out from the hon. Minister if Pepsi Zambia is a Zambian incorporated company. If so, are there any Zambian directors in this company?

Mr Machila: Madam Speaker, as stated, this is a local company and is registered, here, although its shareholding is foreign and its directors are representatives of its shareholders from India.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Mr Kambwili: Madam Speaker, I would like to know on what statistics Pepsi Zambia based its calculations of creating 1,000 jobs. In short, what is the annual average consumption of Pepsi in Zambia?

Interruptions

Madam Deputy Speaker: Order!

We have to know the parameters of the preparations of an hon. Minister on a question because, sometimes, we overstretch and, therefore, the answers may not be as clear as you would like them to be. However, if the hon. Minister has the answer, he may go ahead.

Mr Machila: Madam Speaker, the hon. Member is clearly on a fishing expedition, hence that information is not readily available.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Laughter

STATUS OF THE GOVERNMENT COMMUNICATION FLIGHTS DEPARTMENT

230. Colonel Chanda (Kanyama) asked the Minister of Communications and Transport:

(a)    what the current status of the Government Communication Flights Department was; and

(b)    whether the Government had any plans to dispose of the unserviceable planes and related equipment belonging to the department.

The Deputy Minister of Communications and Transport (Mr Mubika): Madam Speaker, the status of the department, in terms of its core function, is somewhat moribund due to lack of aircraft. However, the department inherited the assets of the defunct national airline (Zambia Airways) in June, 2005 and has since been involved in the rehabilitation and maintenance of the infrastructure and workshop equipment which was not sold by the liquidators of Zambia Airways.

The department has neither serviceable nor unserviceable aircraft. Initially, the department operated five Piper Aztec aircrafts that were replaced by one modern Beechcraft C90 at that time. The five Piper Aztec aircraft, together with their related equipment, were sold in 1991 to Travel International Air Charters (TIAC), Aircraft Services of Chingola under Tender Board Authority No. TB/ORD/002/95 and the proceeds were used to procure the Beechcraft C90.

The Beechcraft C90, together with its related equipment, were sold to Messrs Amanita Premium Oils Limited in August, 2005, under Tender Board Authority No. MCT/GCF/02/2006 at a cost of K170 million and the money was deposited in Control 99.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Colonel Chanda: Madam Speaker, I would like to find out whether it was cost effective to sell the equipment as opposed to repairing it.

The Minister of Communications and Transport (Professor Lungwangwa): Madam Speaker, the aircraft in-question was vandalised to a great extent and it was a decision of the Government to dispose of it because it was cost effective.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.{mospagebreak}

ISSUANCE OF NATIONAL REGISTRATION CARDS TO ELIGIBLE ZAMBIANS IN MFUWE

231. Mr Malama (Mfuwe) asked the Minister of Home Affairs when national registration cards would be issued to eligible citizens in Mfuwe Parliamentary Constituency.

The Deputy Minister of Home Affairs (Mr Phiri): Madam Speaker, I wish to inform the House that the issuance of national registration cards (NRCs) to eligible citizens is a continuous exercise and Mfuwe Constituency is taken care of by the Mpika National Registration Office. In addition, we conducted a mobile registration exercise where we targeted 150,000 people in the Northern Province under Phase II of the Mobile Registration Exercise and a total of 163,833 cards were issued from 1st November, 2009 to 31st January, 2010.

Out of these, 16,792 NRCs were issued in Mpika District under which Mfuwe Parliamentary Constituency falls.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Mr Malama: Madam Speaker, I would like to find out whether it was a deliberate move by the Government to abandon the exercise because out of the three chiefdoms, only one was covered. Was this deliberate or it run out of materials?

Mr Phiri: Madam Speaker, we did not abandon the exercise, but conducted the exercise in phases. We have approached this exercise in phases I, II and III. I will accept the fact that we may not necessarily have captured all the eligible citizens. Instead, we worked on targets and, in all the phases, we went above target. As I said earlier, we did not capture all the people who were eligible because we allocated ninety days per three provinces. That was not enough and there was also the issue of resources.

Madam Speaker, because we are aware that we did not capture all the eligible citizens even after we went beyond the target, which, for us, was a very successful exercise, for a start, we will conduct the third phase that will start on 1st April, 2010, starting with Lusaka, the Copperbelt and Luapula.

Therefore, I can assure you that we will go back to your area. However, suffice it to say that we have our national registration offices at the district level. I realise that some parts of your constituencies are far from the district centres. That is why we have put in place this mobile exercise that we kicked off. I would like to add, here, that if you look back at the way the mobile registration exercise was done in 2001 and 2006, you will realise that it was done probably six months before elections. This time, we kicked off this exercise two-and-half years before the general elections.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Mrs Masebo (Chongwe): Madam Speaker, I just wanted to find out whether the hon. Minister is aware that the national registration exercise, especially the mobile registration, has been chaotic in that there have been many complaints from various parts of the country. Madam Speaker, through you, is it possible for the hon. Minister to come to this House and give us a detailed ministerial statement on phases I, II and III and the plans that have been put in place to ensure that the exercise is successful.

Hon. Opposition Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Phiri: Madam Speaker, it is a proposal we are working on and we will definitely accommodate those suggestions.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Madam Deputy Speaker: With that proposal, we will wait for the statement.

CONSTRUCTION OF ROADS TO KAMWENDO VILLAGE IN MFUWE PARLIAMENTARY CONSTITUENCY

232. Mr Malama asked the Minister of Works and Supply whether there were any plans to construct the road to Kamwendo village in Mfuwe Parliamentary Constituency.

The Deputy Minister of Works and Supply (Dr Kalila): Madam Speaker, the Ministry of Works and Supply has no immediate plans of rehabilitating the road that leads to Kamwendo in Mfuwe Parliamentary Constituency. However, the ministry is hopeful that the Northern Province Provincial Administration, in liaison with the Mpika District Council and the area hon. Member of Parliament, will prioritise the road as they prepare the Rural Roads Work Plan for the Northern Province this year. The Rural Roads Unit will utilise the Government-owned plant and equipment.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Mr Malama: Madam Speaker, since the Government has no immediate plans to construct this road, may I find out how the Government will carry out the exercise of national registration and the registration of voters?

Dr Kalila: Madam Speaker, firstly, I noticed that the eligible people of his constituency had already benefited from the national exercise in Phase I, meaning that, obviously, this cannot be the basis on which he can pose this question. However, having said that, I have already indicated that his office, together with the Mpika District Council and Provincial Administration, are drawing an annual work plan for the construction and rehabilitation of all the roads, including his, and I believe that he has already made his input.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

FEASIBILITY STUDIES ON MUFUCHANI BRIDGE

233. Mr L. J. Mulenga (Kwacha) asked the Minister of Works and Supply:

(a)    how many feasibility studies had been undertaken at the Mufuchani Bridge on the Kafue River in Kitwe District as of June, 2009;

(b)    what the total number of lives lost as a result of accidents at the bridge from 1970 to-date was;

(c)    who the financiers of the feasibility studies were;

(d)    why the studies had taken long;

(e)    when the construction project would start; and

(f)    what the timeframe within which the project would be completed was.

Dr Kalila: Madam Speaker, to date, only one feasibility study for the construction of a bridge at Mufuchani across the Kafue River has been carried out. The study was carried out and completed by Messrs Rankin Engineering.

Madam Speaker, according to the records available, in 1979, there was a major accident in which forty-five people drowned as a result of the pontoon capsizing across this river. There have also been nine cases of drowning from 2000 to date. In 2006, there were two cases which involved two pedestrians who were hit by motor vehicles around the Kafue Site Bridge.

The study was financed by the World Bank and was carried out and completed within the stipulated period of completion.

The construction of the bridge is anticipated to commence this year.

The intended completion period for the construction of the bridge is eighteen months.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Mr L. J. Mulenga: Madam Speaker, I would like to find out about the K100 billion provided for feasibility studies that has been appearing in the Yellow Book for the past three years. I would like to find out whether that money has been expended and who financed the expenditure. He has indicated that the World Bank funded the feasibility studies, but what about what the Government has provided?

Madam Deputy Speaker: Hon. Members, follow-up questions are supposed to be asked one at a time.

Dr Kalila: Madam Speaker, the answer has been very categorical that it is only one feasibility study that has been carried out and that the financer is the World Bank.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Mr Lubinda: Madam Speaker, could the hon. Minister indicate whether or not there has been any budgetary allocation for this particular feasibility study. If so, how have those resources been used in view of the fact that the World Bank has been said to have financed the feasibility study?

The Minister of Works and Supply (Mr Mulongoti): Madam Speaker, it is self-evident that if there were budget allocations for the study, there would be no need to go to the World Bank.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

CONVICTIONS OF GENDER BASED VIOLENCE CASES FROM 2007 TO DATE

234. Mr Chanda (Kankoyo) asked the Minister of Gender and Women in Development:

(a)    how many people were convicted of gender based violence cases from 2007 to date; and

(b)    of the people convicted at (a) above, how many were:

(i)    men;

(ii)    women; and

(iii)    youths.

The Deputy Minister of Gender and Women in Development (Ms Changwe): Madam Speaker, 1,198 people were convicted of gender based violence during the period in-question. Out of this number, there were 911 men, six women and 220 youths.

I thank you.

Mr Chanda: Madam Speaker, it seems as though not enough data has been captured on cases where men are victims. May I find out from the hon. Minister what the Government is doing, through her ministry, to encourage men, like Hon. Daka, who are battered day and night by their wives, to report such cases.

Interruptions

Madam Deputy Speaker: Order!

Laughter

Madam Deputy Speaker: That question is totally irrelevant to what is being discussed. The answer by the hon. Minister and that follow-up question do not match.

Mr Mukanga: Madam Speaker, according to the answer given by the hon. Minister, only six women have been convicted of gender violence. What is the Government doing to ensure that men report such cases so that there can be an increase in the number of women convicted.

Madam Deputy Speaker: I think people have no questions on the topic on the Floor …

Laughter

Madam Deputy Speaker: … and are just making assumptions. We have been told that the number of convictions is based on the cases that are reported. However, the hon. Minister may elaborate the response.

Ms Changwe: Madam Speaker, I think there is enough sensitisation in the country on why such cases must be reported. Those who feel aggrieved report the cases while those who are not aggrieved do not do so.

I thank you, Madam.

Mr Matongo: On a point of order, Madam.

Madam Deputy Speaker: On who? On me?

Laughter

Mrs Masebo: Madam Speaker, I just want to find out from the hon. Minister of Gender and Women in Development (GIDD) when the …

Mr Matongo: On a point of order, Madam.

Interruptions

Madam Deputy Speaker: Order!

A point of order is raised.

Mr Matongo: Madam Speaker, I am very concerned and, therefore, I must speak softly. Since I entered this Chamber, the hon. Minister of Information and Broadcasting Services has converted his seat into a bed. Is he in order to do so?

Laughter

Mr Matongo: As can be seen, he is just being woken up.

Laughter

Hon. Opposition Members: Hear, Hear!

Madam Deputy Speaker: The hon. Member who has raised that point of order has made a conclusion on what has happened. Nonetheless, I would like to point out that the Chair does not concentrate on the actions of one person in this House. Hon. Members can tell that the Chair did not see what the hon. Member, who is sitting directly opposite the hon. Minister, saw because so many hon. Members were speaking. Therefore, the Chair finds it very difficult to make a ruling on that point of order.

However, it is important …

Interruptions

Madam Deputy Speaker: … for all of us to concentrate on what is going on in this Chamber.

Hon. Opposition Members: Hear, hear!

Mrs Masebo: Madam Speaker, when the point of order was raised, I was asking the hon. Minister of GIDD when the Bill on gender violence will be presented to this House so that these issues can be properly tackled.  I think gender violence is a concern to all of us.

Madam Deputy Speaker: The question on the Floor is on cases of gender violence, but the hon. Minister may give a bonus answer.

Ms Changwe: Madam Speaker, the Bill on this matter is at the final stage of drafting. This is being done in collaboration with the Law Development Commission and Ministry of Justice. Once it is finalised, it will be presented to this House.

I thank you, Madam.

CONSTRUCTION OF SCHOOLS IN CHIPULUKUSU AND TWAPIA TOWNSHIPS IN NDOLA PARLIAMENTARY CONSTITUENCY

235. Mr Mushili (Ndola Central) asked the Minister of Education when secondary schools would be built in Chipulukusu and Twapia Townships in Ndola Central Parliamentary Constituency.

The Deputy Minister of Education (Mr Sinyinda): Madam Speaker, the Government is aware of the need to build high schools throughout the country. Currently, the ministry has embarked on the construction of high schools using the contractor and community modes.

Madam Speaker, the ministry, in 2009, …

Interruptions

Madam Deputy Speaker: Order! Order!

The House should listen.

Mr Sinyinda: … earmarked K460 million for the construction of a high school using the community mode in Chipulukusu Township in Ndola Central Parliamentary Constituency. This is reflected on page 61 of the ministry’s 2009 Infrastructure Operation Plan. I would also like to inform the hon. Member that the money for this has already been released and tender procedures are being followed at the district level.

As for Twapia Township, there are no immediate plans to construct a high school in the area.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Mr Mushili: Madam Speaker, does the hon. Minister not realise that the population of Twapia is, in fact, bigger than that of Chipulukusu and, therefore, not constructing a high school in the area will not help the situation? When does the Government plan to construct a secondary school for Twapia residents?

Mr Sinyinda: Madam Speaker, in our answer, we indicated that we are embarking on a massive programme of constructing high schools in the whole country. We realise that many constituencies need high schools except we cannot build them in every place at the same time. However, as I have already stated, a high school is being constructed in the hon. Member’s constituency.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Mrs Musokotwane (Katombola): Madam Speaker, we have heard that the ministry is planning to build a lot of high schools in the country. On the other hand, does this include teachers’ accommodation because, at the moment, the ministry is building a lot of classrooms at the basic and lower basic education levels, but no teachers’ houses are being built to match these classrooms?

Mr Sinyinda: Madam Speaker, we are mindful of that fact and are trying to make sure that, as we build classrooms, teachers’ houses are also built.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Mr Chazangwe (Choma Central): Madam Speaker, can the hon. Minister tell us where the pupils in Twapia who pass Grade 9 examinations go for Grade 10 classes at the moment?

Mr Sinyinda: Madam Speaker, we know that there is still a lot of demand for high schools in the country, but as you may know, townships in places such as Ndola are a little more advantaged in the sense that there are some schools in their vicinity. Other areas are disadvantaged because pupils have to walk long distances to get to school.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Hon. Government Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Mooya (Moomba): Madam Speaker, with regard to the community mode of construction, personally, being an engineer, I am not happy with the quality control they …

Madam Deputy Speaker: Order! Ask your question.

Mr Moomba: Is the Government happy with this mode of construction?

Mr Sinyinda: Madam Speaker, we have put everything in place to ensure quality assurance when it comes to construction of buildings. We are aware that, once in while, in some communities, the construction may not be of good quality, but this is not so for the majority of the construction works in the country.

I thank you, Madam.

Mr Muntanga: The hon. Minister stated that they intend to build several high schools and last year, the ministry undertook a programme to upgrade basic schools into high schools and students were …

Madam Deputy Speaker: Ask your question!

Mr Muntanga: Now that you have realised the shortcomings of doing so, have you reverted those high schools to basic schools by not enrolling Grade 10 pupils?

Mr Sinyinda: Madam Speaker there was a time we allowed some basic schools to be upgraded to high schools. However, we realised that there was going to be a big problem in terms of laboratories in these basic schools. This is the reason we want to build high schools with laboratories in order for us to deliver quality education.

I thank you, Madam

Mr Kambwili: The biggest impediment for children to go to school is that of lack of user fees. What is the Government doing to make user fees uniform, as most of the schools are charging as high as K500,000 per child? What is the Government doing to make sure that children have access to school and are not impeded by high user fees?

Madam Deputy Speaker: I do not want to look like I want to curtail your question. The hon. Minister may respond, but the original question is on infrastructure in Chipulukusu and Twapia.

Mr Kambwili interjected.

Madam Deputy Speaker: Order!

We have been guided that the person who asks the question has the right to a follow-up one. The rest of us, if we do not have a question that is related to the question, do not have to ask anything. If the hon. Minister has a bonus answer, he may take the Floor.

Mr Sinyinda: Madam Speaker, that is not related to the question asked.

I thank you, Madam.

REHABILITATION WORKS AT THE NDOLA CENTRAL HOSPITAL

236. Mr Mushili asked the Minister of Health:

(a)    how much rehabilitation works had been done at the Ndola Central Hospital since 2007 in terms of the following:

(i)    roof leakages;

(ii)    non-functional elevators; and

(iii)    replacing damaged water pipes; and

(b)    how many districts in the Copperbelt Province referred patients to Ndola Central Hospital.

The Deputy Minister of Health (Dr Musonda): Madam Speaker, the rehabilitation works at the Ndola Central Hospital are on going.

Madam Speaker, in relation to leaking roofs, the contract to rehabilitate the roofs at Ndola Central Hospital was awarded to Gabman’s Limited of Lusaka on 30th April, 2008 and the contractor moved to the site on 3rd July, 2008. The rehabilitation works are still in process and the contract value is K1,715,336,463. So far, the following works have been completed:

(i)    main operating theatre roof;

(ii)    Out-patient Department; and

(iii)    main entrance.

There are some works still to be completed at the old wing in particular, the laundry and main engine room for the lifts.

Madam Speaker, with regard to the non-functioning lifts, a contract was awarded to Behrens Limited of Lusaka to replace the mortuary, maternity and the passenger lifts at Ndola Central Hospital. The contract was awarded on 18th November, 2008 and the contractor took possession of the site on 12th December, 2008.

Currently, the mortuary and maternity lifts have been worked on and have already been commissioned. The works for the passenger lift are still on going and are expected to be completed within the next one month.

With regard to the damaged water pipes, the plumbing works have not been done comprehensively since 2007. However, the hospital has been carrying out ‘quick fix’ maintenance works as the need has arisen.

Madam Speaker, on referrals, the Ndola Central Hospital is a third level hospital that is more like a tertiary hospital and carries out specialised treatments. However, it receives referrals from almost all the districts on the Copperbelt, including the North-Western and Luapula provinces, especially for psychiatric patients for which it is specialised.

I thank you, Madam.

Mr Mushili: Madam Speaker, recognising the fact that the Ndola Central Hospital has a wider range of areas where referred patients are attended to, why is it so poorly funded, and why is it among the least-funded hospitals nationally?

The Minister of Health (Mr Simbao): Madam Speaker, I do not understand what the hon. Member of Parliament means by stating that the Ndola Central Hospital is poorly funded compared to other hospitals. There are five tertiary hospitals in this country and their allocations are the same, except the University Teaching Hospital because it is a teaching hospital.

The Ndola, Kitwe, Chainama and Arthur Davison Children’s hospitals are all funded alike. In fact, Ndola is regarded slightly higher than the other three hospitals.

I thank you, Madam.

Mr Msichili (Kabushi): Madam Speaker, Kabushi is one of the oldest townships in Ndola, and yet it lacks health facilities. In view of the current policy of decongesting the big hospitals such as the Ndola Central and Arthur Davison hospitals, is the Government not considering building mini hospitals in constituencies such as mine?

Madam Deputy Speaker: You are trying to sneak in a new question. Let us stick to the question on the order paper.

Mr Mwiimbu (Monze Central): Madam Speaker, the hon. Minister of Health has indicated that Ndola Central Hospital has psychiatric facilities to cater for a large population on the Copperbelt. I would like to find out whether this particular hospital has adequate facilities to cater for the rising cases of hallucinations in this country.

Hon. UPND Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Simbao: Madam Speaker, maybe, the hon. Member is hallucinating. We do not have records that show that there is a high number of hallucination cases in this country. I think we should be serious when we talk about sickness. It is not good to talk about it in this manner because I have seen how hon. Members change when they fall sick. They become serious and more compassionate, and yet they try to behave differently when they are alright. Let us, please,  be ...

Hon. Government Members: They are childish.

Mr Simbao: ... compassionate.

Interruptions

Mr Simbao: We do not have the kind of situation the hon. Member has described.

I thank you, Madam.

Mr Kapeya (Mpika Central): Madam, may I learn from the hon. Minister of Health whether the Ndola Central Hospital has a maintenance department. If it has, what are its main duties?

Mr Simbao: Madam Speaker, the Ndola Central Hospital has a Maintenance Unit. Its duties are to carry out both preventive and corrective maintenance.

I thank you, Madam.

Mr Chisala (Chilubi): Madam Speaker, the Ndola Central Hospital does not receive referral cases from the Copperbelt Province only but also the Luapula, Northern and Northern-Western provinces. Does the Government have any plans to extend and modernise the institution?

Mr Simbao: Madam Speaker, yes, currently, a feasibility study on how to improve the status of Ndola Central Hospital is under way. A medical school that will be in line with the University Teaching Hospital will be introduced and, as such, it will be a different referral hospital compared to the other three in the province that will not have medical schools.

I thank you, Sir.

Mr Mukanga: Madam Speaker, the toilets used by mourners at the mortuary have been in a bad state for the past five years. When will the ministry look at this situation since mourners use these toilets?

Mr Simbao: Madam Speaker, thank you for the concern raised by the hon. Member for Kantanshi. We are going to look into this situation by having a meeting with the Ndola Central Hospital Managing Director and see how we can rectify it. Definitely, a toilet is one area of need which should be well looked after and if the toilets at the Ndola Central Hospital mortuary are in a bad state, the ministry will, definitely, move in and work quickly to correct the situation.

I thank you, Sir.

Mr Kambwili: Madam Speaker, the low water pressure at the hospital is a source of worry because the wards on the higher level usually do not have water. When will the Government work on the water problem at the Ndola Central Hospital?

Dr Musonda: Madam Speaker, the challenge that we have at the Ndola Central Hospital, in terms of planning works, is the way it was constructed. The water pipes are in-built and when there are leakages and break downs, it is quite difficult to break the walls and rectify the situation. This is what has affected the low water pressure, especially in wards on the higher level. In order to solve this problem, the Government will use the new restructuring process. The ministry has employed a senior engineer to work on a needs assessment. Once this is done, the ministry will look at the amount required to rectify the situation after the bill of quantities has been presented.

I thank you, Madam.

CONSTRUCTION OF DORMITORIES, STAFF HOUSES, LABORATORIES AND ADDITIONAL CLASSROOMS AT KABUNDA GIRLS’ HIGH SCHOOL IN BAHATI PARLIAMENTARY CONSTITUENCY

237. Mr Chimbaka (Bahati) asked the Minister of Education when the Government would construct dormitories, staff houses, laboratories and additional classrooms at Kabunda Girls’ High School in Bahati Parliamentary Constituency.

Mr Sinyinda: Madam Speaker, the expansion of the school infrastructure for Kabunda Girls’ High School will be considered after completion of the dormitory that is currently being constructed and is expected to be completed during the course of this year.

I thank you, Madam.

Mr Mukanga: Madam, when will the ministry give hon. Members the operational master plan like they did last year immediately Parliament commenced?

Mr Sinyinda: Madam Speaker, firstly, I would like to apologise for not providing the operational plan, but it is our hope to provide it within a month or two months.

I thank you, Madam.

ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE ZAMBIA CONSOLIDATED COPPER MINES-INVESTMENT HOLDINGS

238. Mr Simuusa asked the Minister of Commerce, Trade and Industry when the Zambia Consolidated Copper Mines-Investment Holdings last published its annual report.

Mr Machila on behalf of the Minister of Commerce, Trade and Industry (Mr Mutati): Madam Speaker, the last annual report was published for the financial year ending 30th June, 2005. The delay in finalising the accounts for publication of the annual reports for 2006, 2007 and 2008, which have already been audited, is as a result of the need to report the Zambia Consolidated Copper Mines-Investment Holdings (ZCCM-IH) investments at a fair value, in compliance with the international accounting standards. ZCCM-IH investments in subsidiary and associate companies have previously been reported in the annual reports. Before publication, following the completion of the audit of accounts of the year ended 2006, the company engaged an external consultant to undertake valuation of its investments in 2007. The consultant was engaged after an open tender process that took several months to conclude. Unfortunately, the valuation exercise of the consultant has not been finalised to the satisfaction of ZCCM-IH external auditors due to the lack of a comprehensive core resource data from the mines. To avoid further delays and expedite the finalisation of the stated annual reports and accounts, the ZCCM-IH Board recently resolved to revert to the use of cost values for financial reporting purposes until such a time that data for use in the fair valuation is consistently available. It is envisaged that the annual reports and accounts for 2006, 2007 and 2008, with their incorporated cost values as opposed to fair values, will be finalised before 31st December, 2009. The publication of the annual report and accounts for the financial year ended 30th June, 2009 awaits issuance of the accounts for the earlier financial periods stated above.

I thank you, Madam.

Mr Simuusa: Madam Speaker, clearly, this is totally unacceptable for a company such as ZCCM-IH. Why has the Government allowed ZCCM-IH to not publish or produce annual reports for as far back as 2005 with all these serious implications which I will not go into detail?

Mr Machila: Madam Speaker, we note the concern that has been raised by the hon. Member and I wish to assure the House that it is being addressed.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Mr Muyanda (Sinazongwe): Madam Speaker, at Maamba Collieries Limited, ZCCM-IH ran a contract management with other small sub-contracted companies and, in the process, US$5 million, which was pumped into the mine to revamp its operations, disappeared in a possible fraudulent manner. Is the Government prepared to carry out thorough investigations into how ZCCM-IH misapplied this money and punish its management that was solely responsible for the misuse of the public funds?

Mr Machila: Madam Speaker, the issues alluded to by the hon. Member will be captured in the course of auditing the books of accounts and will be addressed upon completion of the exercise.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Mr L. J. Mulenga: Madam Speaker, I would like to find out from the hon. Minister how the Government is assessing the viability of this company in the absence of audited books of accounts and whether it is able to understand how the company is operating.

Mr Machila: Madam Speaker, the company does not operate in the dark. In the absence of audited books of accounts, there are management accounts that are available to assist the day-to-day operations.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Mr Kambwili: Madam Speaker, during the global credit crunch, mining companies declared losses. As a result, it is reported that ZCCM-IH is broke because of not having received dividends from the mining companies. Can the hon. Minister confirm whether it is true that ZCCM-IH is broke?

Mr Machila: Madam Speaker, I am not in possession of that information.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

RECRUITMENT OF A QUALIFIED ACCOUNTANT AT THE OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR OF HEALTH IN CHILUBI DISTRICT

239. Mr Chisala asked the Minister of Health why the Government had taken over three years without recruiting a qualified accountant at the Office of the Director of Health in Chilubi District to enhance financial management.

Dr Musonda: Madam Speaker, I wish to inform the House that two officers have been appointed to fill the positions of an assistant and accounts assistant at Chilubi District Office because the Chilubi Health Office has only two funded positions of accounting personnel in the new structure that we are undertaking. Therefore, the delay in appointing these officers was a result of the on-going restructuring of the Ministry of Health. Prior to the appointments that I have just mentioned, the accounting functions were being performed by the district accounting officer under the Central Board of Health.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Mr Chisala: Madam Speaker, first of all, let me salute the hon. Minister for sending an accountant to the district at long last.

Hon. Opposition Members: Hear, hear!

Mr Chisala: Could the hon. Minister explain why reports of financial irregularities have continued to occur at the institution despite an accounts assistant having been sent to the district?

Dr Musonda: Madam Speaker, I am sure that the hon. Member appreciates that this is the reason the Government has sent those staff members to rectify the problems.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.{mospagebreak}

NUMBER OF HEALTH FACILITIES COUNTRYWIDE

240. Mr Chisala asked the Minister of Health:

(a)    what the total number of the following health facilities countrywide was as at January, 2009;

(i)    district hospitals;

(ii)    general hospitals; and

(b)    what the total establishment of medical doctors and clinical officers at each hospital level above was.

Dr Musonda: Madam Speaker, I would like to inform the House that there were seventy-two first level hospitals or district hospitals and twenty-one general hospitals countrywide as at January, 2009.

The total establishment for medical officers or doctors at the above facilities was 1,143 and 1,228 clinical officers. I will lay the breakdown of the cadres as per district hospital on the Table.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Mr Chisala: Madam Speaker, I would like to find out whether the hon. Minister is aware that most of the rural health institutions are critically understaffed. If so, how does the ministry intend to help out?

Dr Musonda: Madam Speaker, we are aware of the crisis that we are facing, in terms of human resource, in the Ministry of Health. In 2006, a document called the Human Resource for Health Strategic Plan was put in place and it is supposed to be reviewed this year. With that strategic plan, we have increased the capacity and intake of nurses. For example, we have seen an increase in the construction of infrastructure in Lusaka at the University Teaching Hospital (UTH) where the nursing school is being expanded to have a double in-take. This is also happening at the Ndola Central, Roan General and Kitwe Central hospitals where we are also likely to double the intakes this year. At the same time, the hon. Minister mentioned that we are planning to open another medical school to ensure that we increase the number of doctors. I think, the Government is moving towards achieving adequate human resource in the health sector.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Mr Mushili: Madam Speaker, in view of the Retention Scheme and continued brain drain due to poor conditions of service in this country, how are our staffing levels countrywide because for Ndola alone, the staffing level is below 35 per cent …

Mr Chazangwe: On a point of order, Madam Speaker.

Madam Deputy Speaker: A point of order is raised.

Mr Chazangwe: Madam Speaker, I rise on a serious point of order. Is my traditional cousin, the hon. Deputy Minister of Local Government and Housing, Mr Muchima, in order to put on a white wig as if he is a Presiding Officer?

I need your serious ruling, Madam Speaker.

Laughter

Madam Deputy Speaker: Order!

Through this point of order, the Chair realises that some hon. Members missed each other. I hope that the hon. Member who raised the point of order can discuss how that can be rid of outside this Chamber.

Laughter

Madam Deputy Speaker: The Chair does not mind having the same colour of wig as that of the hon. Member.

Laughter

Madam Deputy Speaker: The hon. Member for Ndola Central may continue, please.

Mr Mushili: Madam Speaker, in view of the fact that the Retention Scheme has not helped to retain medical personel such as doctors, nurses and clinical officers, what are the national staffing levels? Ndola alone, …

Madam Deputy Speaker: Order!

You are debating, hon. Member. Ask your question.

Mr Mushili: Madam Speaker, will the hon. Minister confirm that the staffing levels in hospitals is generally less than 35 per cent?

Interruptions

Mr Simbao: Madam Speaker, firstly, I would like to correct the impression that the Retention Scheme has not worked. That is not true. The Retention Scheme has worked very well. This is a set of incentives given to rural-based doctors and not urban-based doctors. The only problem we have is that when these people go for rural postings, they do not want to come back. We would like them to come and continue with their schooling so that they can become consultants. It is really becoming difficult to get them back here. Doctors prefer staying in rural areas to urban areas because they benefit more from there. We are, therefore, trying to make it a rule, as we have made one regarding the Retention Scheme, to only apply to a rural posting on the understanding that one will only go for a year and come back to continue one’s studies. We are facing problems with getting doctors back to school after sending them to rural postings because the Retention Scheme provides doctors with a lot of incentives such as being sent outside for training, brand new vehicles and one’s children school being paid for. Therefore, they would not want to lose out on these incentives. In this vein, I would like to correct the impression that the Retention Scheme has failed.

Madam Speaker, in terms of staffing levels, …

Madam Deputy Speaker: Hon. Minister, do not look at them in spite of their questions. Look at the Chair.

Mr Simbao: … we have said, in this House, that the establishment should be between 55,000 and 56,000. At the moment, it is only 27,000. This means that it is only about half of what it should be. We have not yet reached the full capacity of the required establishment. The hon. Deputy Minister of Health has just explained the efforts we are making to meet the establishment. We are, therefore, trying our best. For example, at the Ndola Central Hospital, we want to increase the number of consultants.

Interruptions

Mr Simbao: Can you listen first? Do not just keep talking. We want to do that because we feel that Ndola Central Hospital is one of the important hospitals …

Madam Speaker: The hon. Minister may face the Chair.

Mr Simbao: … in this country. The same applies to the Kitwe Central Hospital. As such, when we train consultants, we give them options to relocate to Ndola or Kitwe. The hon. Member of Parliament lives in Ndola, therefore, he can verify this information with the Executive Director of the Ndola Central Hospital. I am sure he will be able to get a better answer than what I am telling him.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Mrs Musokotwane: Madam Speaker, the hon. Minister said that there were seventy-two district hospitals in Zambia. However, Kazungula, that I want to believe is one of Zambia’s seventy-two districts, does not have a district hospital. Therefore, how is it counted among the districts where there are hospitals, and yet there is no hospital in the district, or is the hon. Minister saying that some districts have more than one district hospital?

Mr Simbao: Madam Speaker, the truth is that some districts have more than two hospitals. For example, Solwezi has more than two hospitals. The seventy-two district hospitals include all the district hospitals regardless of whether they being mission or Government-run as they are still first level hospitals. In one town, for example, there may be mission hospitals that are at the district level. The question was how many district or first level hospitals there were. Therefore, we have given you the number of all the known first-level private, mission and Government hospitals.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Mr Chongo (Mwense): Madam Speaker, the hon. Minister said that the ministry wants to make a rule that doctors should be in rural areas for a year. Will this not discourage doctors from going to rural areas since it takes over a year to process incentives such as purchasing vehicles?

Mr Simbao: Madam Speaker, at the moment, the biggest problem we have is that there are very few consultants. There are very few doctors, but there are even fewer consultants. We were supposed to have many consultants all the way up to the general hospitals. For instance, one would be lucky to find a consultant at Kasama or Chipata General hospitals. We are trying to bring back most of these doctors so that they can advance their training and become consultants. We need to staff the general hospitals. Therefore, if they decide not to come back, they deny us the opportunity to train them further and enable them to become consultants. Although we have a good number of consultants based here at UTH, we have not filled the establishment yet. Most of the doctors want to stay longer when they go to rural areas. That should not be the case. These people should only go for a year and continue with their studies upon return.

Mr Chanda: Madam Speaker, when will the ministry pay attention to the Ronald Ross Hospital whose state of infrastructure is worsening?

Mr Simbao: Madam Speaker, if the hon. Member has checked in the Yellow Book, he will notice that we have allocated rehabilitation funds to all provinces. This money is disbursed by the provincial administration and not the headquarters. It is important that the hon. Member sees the provincial administration and requests it to apportion some of the money thereto allocated to the rehabilitation of the Ronald Ross Hospital. We have set this money aside for them to utilise on areas where there is an urgent need in the province.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Mr Lubinda: Madam Speaker, the hon. Minister stated that the establishment is 56,000, and it is only now that the filled positions are approaching 27,000. Can he clarify whether he is talking about doctors, medical officers or clinical officers? If he is, can he, please, relate these figures to the figures that were given by the hon. Deputy Minister who stated that in all the district and general hospitals, there are only 2,371 both medical and clinical officers?

In addition, Madam Speaker, the hon. Minister …

Madam Deputy Speaker: One question only.

Mr Simbao: Madam Speaker, the figure given by the hon. Deputy Minister is for doctors and not all health workers. There are many clinics, health posts and health centres. However, the 56,000 relates to all the health workers. It is a figure that encompasses every employee in the Ministry of Health.

Madam Speaker, I thank you.

Mr Muntanga: Madam Speaker, the hon. Minister mentioned that we have succeeded to retain doctors because of incentives. I would like to find out what incentives we intend to give to clinical officers, especially that they are the ones who run away from rural health centres. Nurses who are transferred to rural areas run back to town the following day because of poor conditions of service. What incentives are we going to give to this group of staff given that we need them in rural areas?

Mr Simbao: Madam Speaker, the Retention Scheme, whose level of remuneration, of course, may be different from that of doctors, has been extended to nurses and paramedics. The House may be aware that it is very difficult to control the movement of female staff. At the moment, there is very little we can do when they get married. There is no policy in the Ministry of Health, at the moment, that allows us to separate a married couple. This could be what is happening in most cases.

Madam Speaker, I thank you.

Mr Kambwili: Madam Speaker, the hon. Minister stated that they were doubling the intake by creating more classrooms at Roan General Hospital and University Teaching Hospital (UTH). I would like to find out from the hon. Minister why Roan General Hospital has failed to recruit students for the January intake, citing budgetary constraints.

Dr Musonda: Madam Speaker, I would like to correct what the hon. Member has just said.

Madam Deputy Speaker: Order!

Business was suspended from 1615 hours until 1630 hours.

[MADAM DEPUTY SPEAKER in the Chair]

Dr Musonda: Madam Speaker, before business was suspended, I wanted to correct the statement that was made by the hon. Member for Roan that we have not had a January intake at Roan General Hospital. The in-take has been postponed to July because of some logistical problems. However, we will double the in-take at Roan General Hospital this year.

Madam Speaker, I thank you.

RETRIEVING THE BROKEN HILL MAN SKULL FROM THE WESTMINSTER ABBEY MUSEUM IN LONDON

241. Mr Kakusa (Kabwe Central) asked the Minister of Foreign Affairs what progress the Ministry had made to retrieve the Broken Hill Man skull from the Westminster Abbey Museum in London.

The Minister of Information and Broadcasting Services (Lieutenant-General Shikapwasha): Madam Speaker, I wish to inform this august House that my ministry is still consulting with the relevant stakeholders such as the Ministry of Tourism, Environment and Natural Resources, Ministry of Justice and the British Government, itself, on how best we can resolve this long-outstanding matter.

Madam Speaker, I, however, wish to state that Britain, where this skull is kept, is not a signatory to the United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) Convention of 1970 which compels member countries to return artifacts upon demand by countries of origin. Therefore, it may not be an easy battle and may take a long time to conclude.

Madam Speaker, I thank you.

Dr Scott (Lusaka Central): Madam Speaker, there are many countries in the world that are complaining about their artifacts being in the hands of the Western countries’ museums. I can think of Greece, Egypt and South Africa. Are we not consulting with our fellow claimants on a common way forward and, perhaps, attempting to make the British sign the UNESCO Agreement?

Lieutenant-General Shikapwasha: Madam Speaker, broader consultation continues in the ministry and by the Government to see how best we can get it back to Zambia.

I thank you, Madam.

Mr Kambwili: Madam Speaker, I would like to find out if the British Government is using the skull for monetary gain, and if so, why can we not negotiate to get a share of this money?

Lieutenant-General Shikapwasha: Madam Speaker, there are, indeed, monetary gains because this skull is in a museum where people have to pay a certain amount of money to enter. Our position is that we could have more money if we brought the skull back here.

I thank you, Madam.

Mrs Musokotwane: Madam Speaker, I would like to find out whether there is any country that has managed to retrieve their artifacts and what they did for them to get them back.

Lieutenant-General Shikapwasha: Madam Speaker, our investigations revealed that there are countries that have been successful in retrieving their artifacts from other countries other than the United Kingdom. Those countries are signatories to the UNESCO Convention that allows member countries to surrender the artifacts when the countries of origin ask for them. It has been very difficult to do so with the United Kingdom and, thus many other countries have had the same experience with it.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

REVIEW OF THE PROFESSIONAL BOXING AND WRESTLING CONTROL ACT

242. Mr D. Mwila asked the Minister of Sport, Youth and Child Development:

(a)    when the Professional Boxing and Wrestling Control Act would be reviewed to legalise the hosting of female boxing tournaments in Zambia; and

(b)    why the Government had taken long to review the Act.

The Deputy Minister of Sport, Youth and Child Development (Mr Misapa): Madam Speaker, in response to the answer …

Laughter

Mr Kambwili: Question!

Mr Misapa: Madam Speaker, the review of the Professional Boxing and Wrestling Control Act to legalise the hosting of female boxing tournaments in Zambia has already been undertaken and the Bill will soon be presented to this august House after approval by Cabinet.

Madam Speaker, it took long to review the above Act due to the fact that the process of consultation with the stakeholders was costly. My ministry did not have adequate financial resources to undertake this exercise. The consultations were done over a period and as and when funds were available.

Madam Speaker, I thank you. 

Interruptions

Madam Deputy Speaker: Order!

Mr D. Mwila: Madam Speaker, when the law was made, it was meant for men at that time. I would like to find out from the hon. Minister whether hosting of female boxing tournaments in Zambia is illegal at the moment.

The Minister of Sport, Youth and Child Development (Mr Chipungu): Madam Speaker, I do not want to use the words ‘illegal’ or ‘legal’. What I want to say is that somehow we were compelled to allow female boxers to participate by the fact that Zambia is affiliated to a number of international organisations such as the World Boxing Council (WBC), African Boxing Union (ABU) and the Commonwealth which made a blanket decision to allow female boxing in the member states.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Dr Machungwa (Luapula): Madam Speaker, could the hon. Minister confirm that allowing female boxing in the country is, in fact, helping to reduce the discrimination or differences between the sexes. In fact, this is the trend in Zambia and in the world today.

Laughter

Mr Chipungu: Madam Speaker, let me confirm that it is certainly helping to reduce the gender biases. May I go beyond and say that, in fact, this has now become a source of employment and income generation. So far, we have seen a number of girls who have come on board to participate in female boxing.

 I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Mr Mwenya (Nkana): Madam Speaker, I would like the hon. Minister to give a specific period within which the Bill on the Professional Boxing and Wrestling Control Act will be brought to this House for amendment because the Act has now become irrelevant to professional boxing and wrestling in this country.

Mr Chipungu: Madam Speaker, the Bill in question will be brought before this House during the current sitting.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Mr Ngoma (Sinda): Madam Speaker, I would like to find out what is superior between the World Boxing Federation and our own laws. Could the hon. Minister state what the position is on our highly rated boxer, Esther Phiri, in view of the fact that, according to the law, it is very clear that no female boxer shall be registered. What is the position on her?

Mr Chipungu: Madam Speaker, as a country, we have our own laws. Therefore, I want to state that boxing is run by the Zambia Professional Boxing and Wrestling Control Board. These have regulations and rules. However, they are affiliated to international organisations such as the WBC and ABU. Obviously, while we appreciate that, as a country, we have our own supreme laws, there is also a need for them to be regulated by international laws and rules as indicated.

 I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Mr Lubinda: Madam Speaker, I would like to find out from the hon. Minister what the consultations are all about, how much is involved and their relevance, given the fact that the law, as it exists, has already been abrogated by hosting female boxers in the country. Are they intending to reverse the trend if the stakeholders reject the hosting of female boxing tournaments?

Mr Chipungu: Madam Speaker, whenever we are looking at issues, especially those that involve the community at large, there is a need for consultation. My ministry, on its own, cannot put in place what is required, hence the need to go out to consult the boxers themselves. There are other affiliates such as the Amateur Boxing Association and various other stakeholders who have given us a go ahead. To this effect, a Bill will be brought to this House during the current sitting.

As for how much money was spent, I do not have the figures at the moment, but, obviously, there was extensive travelling and meetings held throughout the country, and all these required money.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Mr Malama: Madam Speaker, now that this issue has been brought to the attention of this House, I would like to find out whether Esther Phiri’s trip to America will be cancelled until this anomaly is corrected.

Mr Kambwili: The trip cannot be cancelled. Aleya!

Laughter

Mr Chipungu: Madam Speaker, why should we cancel the trip? It has already been arranged and she will go.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Mrs Musokotwane: Madam Speaker, now that there are intentions of revising the Act, is it going to be gender sensitive so that there is no discrimination between men and women and the Act is for both male and female boxers?

Mr Chipungu: Madam Speaker, the answer is positive. The Act will be for both female and male boxers.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.{mospagebreak}

SOCIAL RESPONSIBILIY OF LUMWANA COPPER MINES PLC IN SOLWEZI

243. Mr Mwango asked the Minister of Mines and Minerals Development:

(a)    how much the Lumwana Copper Mines Plc had spent on corporate social responsibility in Solwezi as of June, 2009; and

(b)    what the company’s future commitment to corporate social responsibility was.

The Deputy Minister of Mines and Minerals Development (Mr Nkhata): Madam Speaker, by June, 2009, the Lumwana Mining Company had spent more than K257 billion on:

(a)    development of a self-contained modern town comprising a housing estate, providing for employee-owned housing units under a company-driven home ownership scheme, a mine school for children of mine employees, social amenities incorporating a supermarket, recreation facilities such as tennis courts, gymnasium, squash courts, a modern town swimming pool and two soccer fields.

(b)    a comprehensive support programme for social infrastructure in the Lumwana Area in consultation with Mukumbi, Mumena and Matebo Chieftaincies, the Government of Zambia and the local community on:

(i)    construction of classrooms and teachers’ houses at various Government schools, including Manyama, Shilenda, Kananga, Luanvundu, Matebo, Maheba and Shiinda;

(ii)    construction of a first public library in the area with a 20,000 book donation;

(iii)    construction of the Nkulumazhiba Health Clinic;

(iv)    sinking of nine boreholes in the local community and borehole maintenance training;

(v)    construction of the Mutanda Women’s and Orphans’ Centre and delivery of power and water to the centre; and

(vi)    construction of a poultry incubation house for the Bukomo Women’s Co-operative in Mutanda.

(c)    An intensive capacity building programme at the local and national levels through:

(i)    fifty-four university scholarships to the University of Zambia;

(ii)    ninety-two Grade 9 scholarships to local community-based children;

(iii)    adult education classes;

(iv)    vocational multi-skills apprenticeship and business training of 174 entrepreneurs from twenty-two community groups in bread making, poultry rearing and meat production, brick making, jam making and metal fabrication;

(v)    agri food innovators’ project for farmers under a pilot micro-finance revolving seed fund;

(vi)    development of fish farming activities in LMC’s water storage facility;

(vii)    commencement of a feasibility study for the Lumwana Pineapple Processing Plant; and

(viii)    training for a Community HIV/AIDS Task Force; and

All these activities have been carried out in close consultation with the respective traditional and Government leadership and the local communities. A Special Lumwana Development Trust Fund has been established under which targeted community development initiatives are engaged with the local community.

(d)     the Lumwana Mining Company’s future commitment to corporate social responsibility is in the following areas:

(i)    scholarships at the basic education and university levels;

(ii)    education support for adults;

(iii)    multi-skills training for local community groups for several trades and economic sectors;

(iv)    micro-finance for agriculture projects;

(v)    fish farming support and infrastructure; and

(vi)    establishment of a pineapple processing plant which will, in turn, support growing of pineapples by locals.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Mr Mwango: Madam Speaker, is the K257 billion part of the future plans of the company to plough it back into the community?

Mr Nkhata: Madam Speaker, K257 billion was the amount of money used. The question was on how much money was spent.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Hon. Member: Billion!

Mr Kakoma: Madam Speaker, what is the Ministry of Mines and Minerals Development doing to encourage other mining houses such as Kansanshi, which is also in Solwezi, but is practicing management styles that are anti-social, to undertake proper social responsibility for the community?

Mr Nkhata: Madam Speaker, at the moment, the hon. Minister of Mines and Minerals Development has written to all mining houses to incorporate their social responsibilities in their plans of work. Of course, we have observed that some of the mining houses are not doing what they are supposed to. For this reason, the hon. Minister has written to them all so that they can co-operate in that area.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Ms Changwe: Hear, hear!

Mr Kambwili: Madam Speaker, I would like to know whether it is only when these mining companies are making profits that they can assume corporate social responsibility. In Luanshya, all those who had scholarships have had their scholarships discontinued by the new miner, stating that they are not yet making profits. If you look at the answer, …

Madam Deputy Speaker: Order!

You are debating. Can you ask your question?

Mr Kambwili: … the mine in-question has not been making profits, but has been assuming corporate social responsibility. Is it a rule that corporate social responsibility should only be assumed only when profits are made?

Mr Nkhata: Madam Speaker, it is not a rule, but the Government is encouraging all mining houses to embrace corporate social responsibility.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Mrs Masebo: Madam Speaker, the hon. Minister has indicated that he has, now, written to the mining companies to encourage them to take up social responsibilities within their communities. Is the hon. Minister also aware that some mines tie social responsibility to taxes such as rates? I would like to know what the ministry is doing to ensure that this is not the case.

Mr Nkhata: Madam Speaker, this is the reason the hon. Minister has written to all the mining houses to create awareness and remind them of their social responsibilities.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Dr Scott: Madam Speaker, I want to follow up on the last question which did not receive an adequate answer. The point the hon. Member for Chongwe (Mrs Masebo) was trying to make here is a voluntary form of taxation where you pay or do not pay, depending on how you feel and if there is a trade-off with, for example, the windfall tax and the other tax concessions. We are actually allowing these companies to run a state within a State. It is a substitute for paying …

Madam Deputy Speaker: Order!

You are debating. Let us desist from debating. Just ask a follow-up question.

Will the hon. Deputy Minister continue, please?

Mr Nkhata: Madam Speaker, since the hon. Member was still debating, I did not get his question clearly.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Mr Kambwili: Question!

Mr Mukanga: Madam Speaker, I would like to find out from the hon. Minister when he will come to this House with a Bill to compel the mining companies to embrace corporate social responsibility.

Mr Nkhata: Madam Speaker, the Government has a way of presenting Bills. When it will be necessary to do so, it will be done. That is how the Government works.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Mr Chanda: Madam Speaker, I would like to find out from the hon. Minister how the mining companies will be compelled to take corporate social responsibility to benefit the people when the development agreements in some mining companies are so unfavourable that they do not include any aspect of corporate social responsibility.

Mr Nkhata: Madam Speaker, I do not think the Government is still dealing with development agreements because we have done away with them.

Hon. PF Members: Question!

Mr Lubinda: Madam Speaker, from what I know, corporate social responsibility is voluntary, hence it cannot possibly be legislated. Given that background, I would like to find out from the hon. Minister …

Mr Kambwili: On a point of order, Madam.

Madam Deputy Speaker: A point of order is raised.

Mr Kambwili: Madam Speaker, I rise on a very serious point of order. It is a fact that Kansanshi Mine has sued the Government so that it can continue with the development agreements and that, as far as it is concerned, the development agreements are in force. Is the hon. Deputy Minister in order to mislead this House by stating that the development agreements are no longer in force in this country? I need your serious ruling.

Madam Deputy Speaker: This issue has to be understood in the context in which the question was put to the hon. Minister. I realise that a law was passed to that effect. Thus, the hon. Minister may state that, although there is always a right for anybody to sue over such contractual issues. Therefore, he may not be totally out of order.

Will the hon. Member for Kabwata continue, please?

Mr Lubinda: Madam Speaker, I was asking a question based on the response of the hon. Deputy Minister to the question of legislating around corporate social responsibility when he said that when the Government sees it necessary, it will legislate. I was emphasising the fact that corporate social responsibility is voluntary. My question is, if companies such as Lumwana Mining Company show us that they are able and willing to invest such colossal amounts of money amounting to US$60 million to build a small town, is this not a wake up call on the Government to start taxing these mines so that it is the Government that provides those amenities and facilities and not leaving it to corporate social responsibility which is voluntary, not binding and also extremely …

Madam Deputy Speaker: Order!

Hon. Minister, you may answer the first question.

Mr Nkhata: Madam Speaker, this is the reason the Government is encouraging every company to espouse corporate social responsibility. Taxes are another issue.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

CONSTRUCTION OF NEW CLINICS IN SHIWANG’ANDU

244. Major Chibamba (Shiwang’andu) asked the Minister of Health when new clinics promised by the Government over ten years ago would be built at the following places in Shiwang’andu Parliamentary Constituency in Chinsali District:

(i)    Great North Road – Mukwikile Turnoff; and

(ii)    Ketani on D56 Road.

Dr Musonda: Madam Speaker, there is a provision for the construction of a health post on the Great North Road-Mukwikile Turnoff in Shiwang’andu Parliamentary Constituency in the 2010-2012 Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF). In fact, this has been extended to Mutitima in the same constituency.

Madam Speaker, the construction of the new clinic at Ketani on the D56 Road has been included in the Chinsali District Strategic Plan. However, I would like to remind the hon. Member that the implementation of this local district plan depends on the availability of funds.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Mr Chisala: Madam Speaker, despite the positive answer from the hon. Minister, I would like to know why it has taken so long for such projects to be undertaken and completed in rural areas, and yet this is not the case in urban areas.

Mr Simbao: Madam Speaker, to start with, I would like to tell the House that we have started building health posts at all schools. I have never seen the difference that the hon. Member is drawing between the urban and rural areas. In fact, the Ministry of Health has not used the community mode to build health posts because we funded them and it was the same with the urban facilities. Had it not been for the problems the contractor had, all the health posts, by now, would have been completed, starting from the ground to the roof level. I have failed to understand the question. However, when we use the community mode, delays might occur, depending on the eagerness of the community to participate in the construction of the health posts.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

RECOMMENDED DISTANCE AWAY FROM AN AIRPORT FOR RESIDENTIAL OR BUSINESS STRUCTURES

245. Mr Malama asked the Minister of Communications and Transport what the recommended distance away from an airport was for the location of residential or business structures.

Professor Lungwangwa: Madam Speaker, the Laws of Zambia, under Cap 444, outlines limitations of structures around the airports in the aviation regulations. The runway inner approach zone as well as the aerodrome reserve boundary is defined on the Obstacle Restriction Surface Chart. The runway inner approach zone with a radius of 4km shall have land use limited to agriculture, rural residential, sand and gravel pits, as well as sanitary land fill.

Madam Speaker, except where authority has been obtained, in writing, from the Director of Civil Aviation, in terms of Section 4 of the Aviation Regulations, no person shall erect or permit the coming into existence of any obstructions which exceed the permitted or permissible height above the ground level within the airport safeguarding map.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Mrs Phiri: On a point of order, Madam Speaker.

Madam Deputy Speaker: Order!

A point of order on who?

Laughter

Madam Deputy Speaker: The hon. Member for Mfuwe.

Mr Malama: Thank you, Madam Speaker, can I find out why the Houses …

Mrs Phiri: On a point of order, Madam Speaker.

Madam Deputy Speaker: A point of order is raised.

Mrs Phiri: Madam Speaker, I rise on a very serious point of order. It is common knowledge that most hon. Members of Parliament in this House have been punished before for going outside this House to discuss issues which concern this House. I would like to find out from the Chief Whip, who usually takes these issues to the Committee on Privileges, Absences and Support Services, his position on this matter where about a month ago, we watched, on Muvi Television, two outsiders disparaging the hon. Mr Speaker. Madam Speaker, I need your serious ruling on this issue.

Hon. Members: What is your point of order?

Mrs Phiri: Is the Chief Whip in order to keep quiet when the hon. Mr Speaker’s name has been brought into disrepute?

Hon. Members: Hear, hear!

Madam Deputy Speaker: The issue raised, as a point of order, sounds a little difficult for the Chair to follow. That being the case, the Chair will wait to get a little more understanding of those disparaging remarks against Mr Speaker. I think that is what I will say for now. I want to see whether there is really merit in that kind of issue, then I will come back to guide the House.

The hon. Member for Mfuwe may continue.

Mr Malama: Thank you.

Madam Speaker, can I find out why houses are being constructed along Alick Nkhata Road towards the Lusaka City Airport?

Professor Lungwangwa: Madam Speaker, as the hon. Member knows, that particular airport serves a special function and the distances from the airport of those houses are clearly within the parameters of the law.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

2006 TO 2008 ENROLLMENTS AT THE ZAMBIA INSTITUTE FOR LEGAL ADVANCED EDUCATION

246. Mr Mukanga asked the Vice-President and Minister of Justice:

(a)    how many students were enrolled by the Zambia Institute of Advanced Legal Education (ZAILE) from 2006 to 2008, year by year;

(b)    of the total number of students, how many were direct entries from the University of Zambia (UNZA); and

(c)    how many students in the period above were barred from further sitting for the legal practitioners qualifying examinations.

The Deputy Minister of Justice (Mr Chilembo): Madam Speaker, a total of 289 students were enrolled at ZIALE between 2006 to 2008 as per breakdown below:

 Academic Year    No. of Students

2006 – 2007                   116
2007 – 2008                    94
2008 – 2009                    79

Madam Speaker, 266 students were direct entries from UNZA while the other thirty students who enrolled at ZIALE between 2006 and 2008 were facing the five-year ban.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Mr Mukanga: Madam Speaker, over the years, the failure rate at ZIALE has been alarming. What is the Government doing to ensure that it reverses this trend?

Mr Chilembo: Madam Speaker, we are looking at various ways of improving student performance, which include enhancement of teaching methods. The problem is that some students found it difficult to adjust to practice from the theories they learn at university. Therefore, we are trying to see how we can have a new approach to this challenge and also interact with UNZA on what it is teaching. Emphasis is also being placed on courses involving moot courts and the civil procedure at the degree level. This will allow students to have a glimpse of what actually is obtaining in practice.

I thank you.

___________

BILLS

FIRST READING

THE COMPANIES (Amendment) BILL, 2010

The Minister of Livestock and Fisheries Development (Mr Machila): Madam Speaker, I beg to present a Bill entitled the Companies (Amendment) Bill, 2010. The object of this Bill is to amend the Companies Act so as to:

(a)    repeal the provisions relating to the Office of the Registrar of Companies;

(b)    repeal the provisions relating to the requirements for minimum capital for a public or private company before it can operate; and

(c)    provide for matters connected with or incidental to the foregoing.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Interruptions

Madam Deputy Speaker: Order!

The Bill stands referred to the Committee on Economic Affairs and Labour. The Committee is required to submit its report on the Bill to the House on Wednesday, 17th March, 2010. Hon. Members who wish to make submissions or amendments to the Bill …

Interruptions

Madam Deputy Speaker: Order! Order!

… are free to do so within the programme of work of the Committee.

I thank you.

THE PATENTS (Amendment) BILL, 2010

Mr Machila: Madam Speaker, I beg to present a Bill entitled the Patents (Amendment) Bill, 2010. The object of this Bill is to amend the Patents Act so as to:

(a)    provide for the registration of patents by the Patents and Companies Registration Agency; and

(b)    provide for matters connected with or incidental to the foregoing.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Interruptions

Madam Deputy Speaker: Order! Order!

The Bill stands referred to the Committee on Economic Affairs and Labour. The Committee is required to submit its report on the Bill to the House on Wednesday, 17th March, 2010. Hon. Members who wish to make submissions or amendments to the Bill are free to do so within the programme of work of the Committee.

I thank you.

THE TRADE MARKS (Amendment) BILL, 2010

Mr Machila: Madam Speaker, I beg to present a Bill entitled the Trade Marks (Amendment) Bill, 2010. The object of this Bill is to amend the Trade Marks Act so as to:

(a)    provide for the registration of trade marks by the Patents and Companies Registration Agency; and

(b)    provide for matters connected with or incidental to the foregoing.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Madam Deputy Speaker: The Bill stands referred to the Committee on Economic Affairs and Labour. The Committee is required to submit its report on the Bill to the House on Wednesday, 17th March, 2010. Hon. Members who wish to make submissions or amendments to the Bill are free to do so within the programme of work of the Committee.

I thank you.

THE PATENTS AND COMPANIES REGISTRATION AGENCY BILL, 2010

Mr Machila: Madam Speaker, I beg to present a Bill entitled the Patents and Companies Registration Agency Bill, 2010. The objects of this Bill are to:

(a)    establish the Patents and Companies Registration Agency;

(b)    provide for the functions of the Agency;

(c)    transfer from the Government to the Agency, the functions and the powers of the offices of the Registrar of Companies, Registrar of Registered Business Names, Registrar of Patents, Registrar of Trade Marks and Registrar of Registered Designs; and

(d)    provide for matters connected with or incidental to the foregoing.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Mr Machila left his microphone on.

Madam Deputy Speaker: Turn off your microphone.

Mr Machila switched off his microphone.

Madam Deputy Speaker: The Bill stands referred to the Committee on Economic Affairs and Labour. The Committee is required to submit its report on the Bill to the House on Wednesday, 17th March, 2010. Hon. Members who wish to make submissions or amendments to the Bill are free to do so within the programme of work of the Committee.

I thank you.

THE REGISTERED DESIGNS (Amendment) BILL, 2010

Mr Machila: Madam Speaker, I beg to present a Bill entitled the Registered Designs (Amendment) Bill, 2010. The object of this Bill is to amend the Registered Designs Act so as to:

(a)    provide for the registration of designs by the Patents and Companies Registration Agency; and

(b)    provide for matters connected with or incidental to the foregoing.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Madam Deputy Speaker: The Bill stands referred to the Committee on Economic Affairs and Labour. The Committee is required to submit its report on the Bill to the House on Wednesday, 17th March, 2010. Hon. Members who wish to make submissions or amendments to the Bill are free to do so within the programme of work of the Committee.

I thank you.

THE COMPANIES (Certificates Validation) (Amendment) BILL, 2010

Mr Machila: Madam Speaker, I beg to present a Bill entitled the Companies (Certificates Validation) (Amendment) Bill, 2010. The object of this Bill is to amend the Companies (Certificates Validation) Act so as to:

(a)    redefine the Office of the Registrar; and

(b)    provide for matters connected with or incidental to the foregoing.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Madam Deputy Speaker: The Bill stands referred to the Committee on Economic Affairs and Labour. The Committee is required to submit its report on the Bill to the House on Wednesday, 17th March, 2010. Hon. Members who wish to make submissions or amendments to the Bill are free to do so within the programme of work of the Committee.

I thank you.

THE ZAMBIA NATIONAL BROADCASTING CORPORATION (Amendment) BILL, 2010

The Minister of Information and Broadcasting Services (Lieutenant-General Shikapwasha): Madam Speaker, I beg to present a Bill entitled the Zambia National Broadcasting Corporation (Amendment) Bill, 2010. The object of this Bill is to amend the Zambia National Broadcasting Corporation Act, so as to:

(a)    provide for the payment of a television levy;

(b)    authorise dealers as levy collection agents in respect of television tuners, receivers and like devices; and

(c)    provide for matters connected with or incidental to the foregoing.

I thank you, Madam Speaker.

Madam Deputy Speaker: The Bill stands referred to the Committee on Information and Broadcasting Services. The Committee is required to submit its report on the Bill to the House on Wednesday, 10th March, 2010. Hon. Members who wish to make submissions or amendments to the Bill are free to do so within the programme of work of the Committee.

I thank you.{mospagebreak}

PUBLIC INTEREST DISCLOSURE (PROTECTION OF WHISTLEBLOWERS) BILL, 2010

The Minister of Defence (Dr Mwansa): Madam Speaker, I wish to introduce a Bill entitled the Public Interest Disclosure (Protection of Whistleblowers) Bill, 2010. The objects of the Bill are as follows:

(a)    to provide for the disclosure of conduct adverse to the public interest in the public and private sectors;

(b)    to provide for a framework within which public interest disclosure shall be independently and rigorously dealt with;

(c)    to provide for procedures in terms of which employees in both private and public sectors may disclose information regarding unlawful or irregular conduct by their employers or other employees in the employ of their employers;

(d)    safeguard the rights, including employment rights of persons who make public interest disclosures;

(e)    provide a framework within which persons who make public interest disclosure shall be protected; and

(f)    provide for matters connected with or incidental to the foregoing.

I thank you, Madam.

Madam Deputy Speaker: The Bill stands referred to the Committee on Legal Affairs, Governance, Human Rights and Gender Matters. The Committee is required to submit its report on the Bill to the House by Wednesday, 10th March, 2010. Hon. Members who wish to make submissions or amendments to the Bill are free to do so within the programme of work of the Committee.

____________

MOTION

ADJOURNMENT

The Minister of Home Affairs (Mr Mangani): Madam Speaker, I beg to move that the House do now adjourn.

Question put and agreed to.

____________

The House adjourned at 1728 hours until 1430 hours on Wednesday, 24th February, 2010.
___________



QUESTIONS FOR WRITTEN ANSWER

NUMBER OF COMPANIES ENGAGED TO UNDERTAKE OIL EXPLORATIONS COUNTRYWIDE

W28. Mr Simuusa (Nchanga) asked the Minister of Mines and Minerals Development:

(a)    how many companies the Government had engaged to undertake oil explorations countrywide and what their names were;

(b)    whether ZCCM-Investments Holdings was participating in the oil explorations, and

(c)    whether any oil had been discovered in the country and, if so, in which area and province.

The Minister of Mines and Minerals Development (Mr M. B. Mwale): Mr Speaker, no company has yet been engaged to undertake oil explorations countrywide. However, the bidding process for the twenty-three oil and gas blocks, which were advertised by the Government in both local and international media, closed and opened on 6th November, 2009 at 14:30 hours. Eight companies, four local and four international bid for various blocks and the bids are being evaluated.

Mr Speaker, ZCCM-Investments Holdings did not participate in the current bidding round and there is no oil discovery yet as no detailed exploration work has been undertaken up to the drilling stage.

I thank you, Mr Speaker.

STOCK OF ZCCM-IH SHAREHOLDING QUOTED ON LUSAKA STOCK EXCHANGE

W29. Mr Simuusa asked the Minister of Finance and National Planning:

(a)    how much stock of ZCCM-IH shareholding was quoted on the Lusaka Stock Exchange Market;

(b)    how much was paid by ZCCM-IH as dividends to its shareholder from 2006 to-date by shareholder and by year;

(c)    whether they were any outstanding dividends due to its shareholders from 2006 to 2009; and

(d)    what measures the Government and ZCCM-IH had taken to ensure that minority shareholders are protected?

The Minister of Finance and National Planning (Dr Musokotwane): Mr Speaker, I wish to inform the House that the 89,296,428 shares of ZCCM-IH are listed on the Lusaka Stock Exchange (LuSE) of which the Government owns 78,155,636 shares and the remaining 11,140,792 are held by individuals and institutions around the world.

Mr Speaker, no dividends were paid to ZCCM-IH shareholders from 2006 to 2009 as no profits were made by the company. As explained above, there are no outstanding dividends due to the shareholders from 2006 to 2009. The Government and ZCCM-IH comply with the Companies Act provisions that ensure the protection of minority shareholders. Further, the rights of minority shareholders are protected by adherence to the continuing obligations of LuSE.

I thank you, Mr Speaker.

ZCCM-IH SHAREHOLDING IN MINES

W30. Mr Simuusa asked the Minister of Mines and Minerals Development:

(a)    in which mines the ZCCM-Investment Holdings held shares, mine by mine;

(b)    what the net income was in those mines from 2006 to date mine by mine;

(c)    whether there were any accrued dividends unpaid by any of the mines from 2006 to 2009; and

(d)    what measures the Government and ZCCM-IH had taken to recover the moneys at (d).

Mr M. B.Mwale: Mr Speaker,  ZCCM-IH holds shares in the following mines:

    Name of Mine                                      %shares held

    Maamba Collieries Ltd                                  100
    Ndola Lime Company Limited                        100
    Konkola Copper Mines Plc                             20.6
    Kansanshi Copper Mine Plc                           20.0
    Luanshya Copper Mines Plc                         20.0
    NFC Africa Mining Plc                                    15.0
    Chibuluma Mines Plc                                     10.0
    Mopani Copper Mines Plc                            10.0
    Chambish Metals Plc                                       10.0
    Equinox Minerals Limited   
    (Lumwana Copper Mines)                             2.9
    Albidon Limited
    (Munali Nickel Project)                                   2.0

The net income from the mines during the period under review is as follows:

Name of Mine    Net Income (loss)

                                                  2006              2007    2008
                                                 K’ Million      K’Million    K’Million

Maamba Collieries Ltd                (4,905)    (47,755)    Not available as audit is yet to be
            completed

Ndola Lime Company                  (10,044)    (5,255)    Not available as audit is yet to be
            completed

                                                   US$’000    US$’000    US$’000

Konkola Copper Mines Plc          113,937    301,329    134,054

Kansanshi Copper Mine Plc          275,781    425,200    346,900

Luanshya Copper Mine Plc             11,689    4,010    (33,784)

NFC Africa Mining Plc                      17,510    38,623    32,402

Chibuluma Mines Plc                       16,045    36,353    43,268

Mopani Copper Mine Plc               116,088    109,247    (171,311)

Chambishi Metals Plc                        2,574    45,735    (31,137)

Equinox Minerals Ltd
Lumwana Copper Mines                 16,177    (29,415)    172,681

Albidon Ltd
(Munali Nickel Project)                         2,668    (2,205)    Not available as audit is yet to be
            completed

Mr Speaker, ZCCM-Investment Holding received the following dividends from 2006 to-date:

Name of Mine                                          Dividends

                                                       2006    2007         2008        2009
                                                    K’Million    K’Million    K’Million    K’Million
Maamba Collieries Ltd    -    -    -    -

Ndola Lime Company Ltd              3,000           -                 -            4,000

Konkola Copper Mines Plc                -           10,994     5,165          4,232

Kansanshi Copper Mine Plc              -                 -          -               29,557

Luanshya Copper Mines Plc             -                  -          -                -

NFC Africa Mines Plc                        -              13,247    6,609         -

Chibuluma Mines Plc                          -                 -          1,703          9,162

Mopani Copper Mines Plc                  -                  -            -              -

Chambishi Metals Plc                         -                   -         7,909          -

Equinox Minerals Ltd
(Lumwana Copper Mines)                -                    -           -               -

Albidon Ltd
(Munali Nickel Mine)                           -                    -           -                -

Mr Speaker, there are no accrued dividends from any of the mines from 2006 to 2009.

Sir, the Government and ZCCM-Investment Holdings have not taken any measures to recover the money because there are no unpaid dividends from any of the mines.

I thank you, Sir.

MONEY RECEIVED BY ZCCM-IH AS PRICE PARTICIPATION

W31. Mr Simuusa asked the Minister of Finance and National Planning:

(a)    how much money ZCCM-Investment Holdings received as price participation, from 2006 to-date, by year and by mine; and

(b)    whether there were any outstanding moneys due to ZCCM-IH from 2006 to 2009 as price participation from any of the mines.

Mr M. B.Mwale: Mr Speaker, I wish to inform the House that ZCCM-IH received the under listed price participation income from 2006 to-date by year and by mine.

PRICE PARTICIPATION

    Year                 Chambishi Metals Plc    KCM    Mapani Copper Mines     Total (pp)

    2006                           2,318                       -                   -                          2,318

    2007                           15,265                      -                18,695                  33,960

    2008                            22,254                    57,475               -                       79,729

    2009                              8,706                     16,684               -                     25,390

    Total                             48,543                     74,159        18,695                  141,397
       
Mr Speaker, the outstanding moneys due to ZCCM-IH from 2006 to 2009 as price participation from any of the mines is as follows:

US$1,194,000 (K5,743 million) owing from Chambishi Metals Plc for the quarter to 31st December, 2008  (no price participation income after care and maintenance was announced); and

US$ 54.02 million owing from KCM as at 31st March, 2009. The outstanding price participation from KCM is only due for payment once KCM declares a dividend and is caped (set maximum) to an indexed limit of US$16 million (i.e indexed for inflation).

I thank you, Sir.

NUMBER OF HEALTH POSTS MANNED BY QUALIFIED MEDICAL PERSONNEL

W33. Mr Chisala (Chilubi) asked the Minister of Health:

(a)    how many health posts, in the Northern Province, were currently manned by qualified medical personnel; and

(b)    how many of these had medical doctors as officers-in-charge as of 30th June, 2009.

The Minister of Health (Mr Simbao): Mr Speaker, the total number of health posts currently in the Northern Province stands at twenty-nine. Out of these, sixteen health posts are manned by qualified health personnel while thirteen are manned by unqualified, but locally trained personnel who are mostly community health workers. Details are in the attached schedule.

Mr Speaker, the policy of the ministry does not permit posting of medical doctors to health centres or posts. These specialised personnel are posted to facilities providing care at a higher level, for example, district and general hospitals, hence none of the health posts in the Northern Province had a medical doctor as an officer-in-charge. Health posts are mainly manned by clinical officers as officers-in-charge.

Northern Province

Health centres and posts manned by qualified medical personnel – Kasama:

HEALTH CENTRES                        HEALTH POSTS

District     Total No.    No. of         No. of        Total No.     No. of        No. of

        Of health    Health          Health    Of Health    Health      Health
        Medical    Centres      Centres    Posts            Posts      Posts
        Centres    Manned     Manned                Manned      Manned
                By              by                     by       by
               Qualified    unqualified             Qualified   unqualified
        Medical        Medical                         Medical       Medical
        Personnel   Personnel                      Personnel   Personnel   
           
Nakonde    07       06         01           02             01    01
Isoka    09       05         04      01        01      0
Chinsali    14       11         03         02        02      0
Mpika    20       20          0           03        03      0
Mungwi    14       13         01           0          0      0
Kasama    25       23        02           06        05    01
Luwingu    09       05        04           04           0    04
Chilubi    10       05        05           01         01      0
Mporokoso    10    05       05             02                 0     02
Kaputa    09       09          0           03          0    03
Mbala    12       11        01           04         02    02
Mpulungu    07       06        01           01         01      0
Totals    146       119        27           29        16    13
Mr Speaker, I thank you.

PRIVATE HOSPITALS AND BED SPACE AT GENERAL HOSPITALS IN ZAMBIA PROVINCE BY PROVINCE

W34. Mr Chisala asked the Minister of Health:

(a)    how many private hospitals there were in Zambia as of 30th January, 2009, province by province; and
   
(b)    what the bed space at the following hospitals currently was:

(i)    University Teaching Hospital;

(ii)    Kitwe Central;

(iii)    Ndola Central; and

(iv)    Kasama General.

Mr Simbao: Mr Speaker, as at 30th January, 2009 there were 459 private hospitals broken down, province by province, as follows:

Province                   Hospitals    Consulting Rooms    Total

Central                            0                        21                21
Copperbelt                     10                     142              152
Eastern                            0                       12                12
Lusaka                           10                     193              203
Luapula                            0                       10                10
North-Western                 0                         8                  8
Northern                          0                        15               15
Southern                         2                         35               37
Western                          0                           1                 1

Total                               22                       437             459

Mr Speaker, the following are the bed spaces at present in the following hospitals:

Hospital                                      Bed spaces

University teaching Hospitals    1,872
Kitwe Central                                630
Ndola Central                                 851
Kasama general                            400

Total                                           3,753

Mr Speaker, I thank you.


APPENDIX TO QUESTION 340

First Level Hospitals/District Hospitals
Total Establishment

Province    District        Clinical    Medical
    Officer     Officer

Central     Chibombo    Liteta Hospital    11    6
        Kapiri Mposhi    Kapiri Mposhi Hospital    11    7
            Mkushi        Mkushi District Hospital         11    7
            Mumbwa    Nagoma Mission Hospital        11    6
                    Mumbwa District Hospital        11    7
            Serenje        Chitambo Mission Hospital    11    6
                    Serenje District Hospital        11    6
Copperbelt    Luanshya    Thompson Hospital        11    6
                    Luanshya Hospital       
            Chilalabombwe    Konkola Mine Hospital        Private
            Mpongwe    Mpongwe Mission Hospital    11    6
                    St.Theresa Mission Hospital    11    6
            Kitwe        Sinozam Friendship Hospital    Private
            Mufulira        Kamuchanga District Hospital    11    6
Eastern        Chama        Chama District Hospital        11    2
            Chipata        Mwami Mission Hospital        11    6
            Lundazi        Lundazi District Hospital        11    6
            Mambwe    Kamoto Mission Hospital        11    7
            Nyimba        Nyimba District Hospital        11    6
            Petauke        Petauke District Hospital         11    6
                    Minga Mission Hospital        11    6
                    Nyanje Mission Hospital        11    6
Luapula    Kawambwa    Kawambwa District Hospital    11    6
                    Mbereshi Mission Hospital    11    6
            Nchelenge    St. Pauls Mission Hospital        11    6
            Samfya        Kasaba Mission Hospital        11    6
                    Lubwe Mission Hospital        11    6
Lusaka    Chongwe    Mpashya Mission Hospital        11    6
                    Katondwe Mission Hospital    11    6
            Kafue        Kafue District Hospital        11    6
Northern    Chinsali        Chinsali District Hospital         11    6
        Isoka    Isoka District Hospital    11    6
            Luwingu    Luwingu District Hospital        11    6
            Mpika        Chilonga Mission Hospital        11    33
            Mpika District Hospital    11    6
            Mporokoso    Mporokoso District Hospital    11    6
Northwest    Chavuma    Chavuma Mission Hospital    11    6
            Kabompo    Kapombo Mission Hospital     11    6
    Loloma Mission Hospital    11    6
            Mufumbwe    Mufumbwe District Hospital    11    6
    Mwinilunga    Kalene Mission Hospital    11    6                Luwi Mission Hospital    11    6
                    Mwinilunga District Hospital    11    6
Zambezi    Chitokoloki Mission Hospital    11    6
                    Zambezi District Hospital    11    6
Southern    Choma    Choma District Hospital    28    33
    Macha Mission Hospital    28    33
            Gwembe    Gwembe District Hospital        11    6
            Itezhi-tezhi    Itezhi-tezhi District Hospital    11    6
    Kalomo    Kalomo District Hospital    11    6
                    Zimba Mission Hospital    11    6
            Mazabuka    Chikankata Mission Hospital    28    33
                    Kafue Gorge Hospital    11    6
                    Mazabuka District Hospital    11    6
            Livingstone    Shafiq Hospital            Private    
            Namwala    Namwala District Hospital        11    6
            Siavonga    Mtendere Mission Hospital    11    6
                    Siavonga District Hospital        11    6
    Sinazongwe    Mamba Hospital    11    6
Western    Kalabo    Yuka Mission Hospital    11    6                Kalabo District Hospital    11    6
            Kaoma        Kaoma District Hospital        11    6
                    Luena Camp (Defence)
        Lwampa Mission Hospital    11    6
                    Mangongo Mission Hospital    11    6
    Lukulu    Lukulu District Hospital    11    6
    Senanga    Senanga District Hospital    11    6
    Sesheke    Sichili Mission Hospital    11    6
        Yeta Hospital    11    6
    Mwandi Mission    11    6

Total    766    496
Second Level Hospitals/District Hospitals
        Total Establishment
Province        District                        Clinical             Medical
    Officer         Officer

Central    Kabwe        Kabwe Mine            28        33
                    Kabwe General Hospital        28        61
Copperbelt        Chingola    Nchanga North General Hospital    28        33
                    Nchanga South General Hospital    Private
            Luanshya    Roan Antelope Hospital        28        33
            Mufulira        Ronald Ross General Hospital    26        61
                    Malcom Watson            Private
            Kalulushi    Kalulushi Mine Hospital        Private
            Kitwe        Wusakile Mine Hospital        Private
            Ndola        HAHC for Aurthur Davison    28        33
                    HAHC for Ndola Central        28        33
Eastern             Chipata        Chipata General Hospital        28        33
            Katete        St. Francis Mission Hospital    28        33
Luapula            Mansa        Mansa General Hospital        28        33
Northern         Kasama        Kasama General Hospital        28        33
            Mbala        Mbala General Hospital        28        33
Northwestern        Kasempa    Mukinge Mission Hospital        28        33
            Solwezi        Solwezi General Hospital         28        33
Southern        Livingstone    Livingstone General Hospital    26        61
            Monze        Monze Mission Hospital        28        33
Western            Mongu        Lewanika General Hospital    28        33

Total                                    472        645       
   








   


 





 
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